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Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

www.ndsu.edu/ime

Two majors are offered within the Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Department (IME): Industrial Engineering and Management (IE&M) and Manufacturing Engineering (MfgE). Both programs are professionally accredited through the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org).

Career positions for graduates of the two programs often have some similarity; so, many of the courses required for the two majors are the same. Industrial Engineering and Management encompasses manufacturing as well as service industries. Industrial engineers have the technical training to make improvements in a manufacturing setting as well as to evaluate and improve productivity and quality in service industries. Manufacturing engineers apply scientific principles to the production of goods. They are key team members in production of a wide range of products, including automobiles, airplanes, tractors, electronics, toys, building products, foodstuff, and sports and recreational equipment. Both industrial and manufacturing engineers design the processes to make products with the required functionality, to high quality standards, and available when and where customers prefer, at the best possible price.

Following the many different employment paths of our graduates, the two IME programs are differentiated by specific courses that address particular needs of the respective career tracks. IE&M students take additional courses in systems engineering and in the application of engineering skills in people management. MfgE students take additional courses in the analysis and design of manufacturing processes.

In addition, both majors offer the student opportunities for specialization in the junior and senior years. IE&M students can apply their elective courses to extra study in production operations and management, healthcare management engineering, and reliability and quality management. MfgE students can elect additional specialization in electronics manufacturing and process engineering.

Both IE&M and MfgE students learn in an environment of professional realism. Many of the major courses fulfill their learning objectives through projects that are done with industrial companies. Students interact with practicing professionals to learn the real-world applications of the theories they master in the classrooms. There also are many laboratories where students gain hands-on understanding of machinery and engineering systems. Students in both IME majors are urged to take advantage of Cooperative Education and internship positions wherever possible. The knowledge gained through these experiences enhances career preparation and provides for expanded placement opportunity upon graduation. As part of improving the quality of the programs offered, grades less than 'C' will not be accepted for chemistry, physics, and mathematics courses in the degree curricula.

Learning in the IME Department is a partnership of student and faculty. The student’s responsibility is to learn—to master the concepts, theories and practices that lead to career success. The faculty responsibility is four-fold: to provide an atmosphere that is conducive to learning; to assure availability of the tools necessary for effective and efficient learning; to offer guidance on educational and professional matters; and to evaluate student achievement. The usual faculty role is one of mentor, encouraging students to grow in stature as soon-to-be engineers and as practicing professionals.

IME graduates are prepared for careers that design, develop and implement devices, processes and systems that manufacture, construct, operate and service products, equipment and facilities that are often conceived in other engineering disciplines. Career positions in IE&M and MfgE form the vital linkages between abstract concepts and the reality of products and facilities of real use to customers. Graduates are in demand for employment in a very wide range of industries from production of all types of goods to transportation and distribution to information management, to healthcare to consulting.

In all cases, career positions for IME graduates involve design of processes and procedures in advanced technology environments. These professions routinely apply sophisticated modern tools in information handling, distributed communications, computer-driven controls, and a wide variety of technologically advanced equipment and apparatus. In addition, IME career professionals are skilled in the integration of people and technology within the business context of world-class enterprises. They make satisfying careers in organizations of all sizes and types, located in all parts of the world. Graduates generally have a wide choice in where they work and live, as well as the size and kind of company for which to work.

Post-graduate studies also are available in the IME department, leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. For more complete details, see the Graduate Bulletin online.

Industrial Engineering and Management Major

Industrial Engineering and Management is a good choice for people with the aptitude and interest for careers that blend technology and people. First, this is an engineering program, with the traditional content of mathematics, sciences, engineering analysis and design. Graduates are traditionally very successful in nationally-normed professional engineering examinations. Beyond the basics, this program also challenges students to integrate resources with technology. In addition to scientific principles and technological systems, IE&M students study people systems, cost analysis, facilities and other elements of the business enterprise. The "engineering" and "management" pieces are blended and integrated.

Just as the profession requires a blend of scientific, technological and humanistic skills, student learning in IE&M is an integrated process. The discipline-specific courses place the student in position to experience many elements of real situations in industry and commerce. Moreover, the program has been nationally cited for integrating design across all levels, with freshmen and juniors or sophomores and seniors often working together.

Graduates of the IE&M program will be able to:

  1. Apply statistical, operations research and simulation tools to solve problems relevant to modern production, commercial, social and /or governmental organizations, with principal emphasis on quality, productivity, continuous improvement, and enterprise integration.

  2. Design processes and systems to effectively and economically employ and integrate technology and people in organizational environments in industrial, healthcare, logistics, service and/or governmental settings, with appropriate consideration for environmental factors, health and safety, manufacturability and ethical, economic, social and political issues.

  3. Engage in effective learning in topics and areas relevant to professional advancement and to enhancing the quality of personal life.

  4. Participate effectively in multidisciplinary teams in both leadership and followership roles.

  5. Effectively communicate complex technological concepts, issues and professional details to a variety of audiences.

IE&M graduates are in high demand across a wide spectrum of industries. In recent years, the most active employers have represented manufacturing, transportation, warehousing and distribution, healthcare, information systems, software, facilities development and consulting industries, as well as many of the production sectors that have been the traditional concentration for industrial engineers. IE&M graduates are sought after for responsible positions in project and organizational management, financial modeling, technological training, logistics, and design of processes, procedures, facilities, and systems.

Industrial Engineering and Management Areas of Emphasis

Students majoring in Industrial Engineering and Management may prepare for specific career choices by careful use of the technical electives included in the IE&M major. It is suggested that students confer with their academic adviser for assistance in choosing the most appropriate optional courses. Particular areas of emphasis may be selected in the following special interests:

  • Healthcare management engineering
  • Production operations and management
  • Process and production engineering
  • Reliability and quality management
  • Lean manufacturing
  • Specialized manufacturing processes (electronics, aircraft, plastics and composites)

These topical areas are also available for post-graduate study, leading to the Master of Science in Industrial Engineering and Management and the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering degrees. For complete details, see the Graduate Bulletin online.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Industrial Engineering and Management Minor

Students majoring in any engineering discipline may elect a minor in Industrial Engineering and Management. These optional studies offer engineering students the opportunity to add important career-enhancing skills to their technological competencies. The elected courses in an IE&M minor add skills for integrating technology and resources within the complex of people, technology, machinery and information that make up the successful modern business enterprise. Students completing this minor will achieve better understanding of organizational and management processes and will be better prepared to work in the multifunctional teams crucial to success in industry.

Minors at NDSU require a minimum of 16 credits. The foundation requirements for the IE&M minor are:

  • IME 111, Introduction to IME
  • IME 311, Work/Station Design

The remaining 10 credits may be selected from any IME 300- and 400-level courses for which prerequisites are in place. The only exception is Evaluation of Engineering Data (IME 460), which does not count toward this minor.

Interested students are encouraged to visit with relevant faculty in the IME Department for advice on course selection to best suit their career interests. Students must complete the graduation requirements for another engineering major before the designation of the IE&M minor will be placed on their transcripts.

Management Sequence for Non-Majors

The practices and procedures learned in the Industrial Engineering and Management major are universally applied in public and private organizations of all kinds. IE&M courses are available as electives for students majoring in computer science, mathematics, sciences, business administration, cereal science, agricultural economics, and facility management. Courses recommended for non-majors are: Work/Station Design (IME 311), Engineering Economy (IME 440), Systems Engineering (IME 450), Program & Project Management (IME 456), Evaluation of Engineering Data (IME 460), and Total Quality in Industrial Management (IME 462).

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Manufacturing Engineering Major

Manufacturing Engineering is a good choice for people who have both aptitude and interest in production of goods for improved living standard for the general populace. This career field is all about the production of goods—from automobiles and tractors and airplanes…to electronic products, recreational products, sports equipment, books and toys…to foodstuffs. Manufacturing engineers are employed in every industry that produces goods of some kind.

Manufacturing engineers may focus on the interaction between work piece and tool as process scientists or process engineers. They may concentrate on integrating the many different processes and parts necessary to make up finished products—as production engineers. Or, as manufacturing systems engineers, they may take a very wide view of the manufacturing enterprise, including its supply chain, distribution channels, financial structure and resource management. In every particular focus, manufacturing engineers are the people who design the processes through which products are made with the required functionality, to high quality standards, in the quantities needed, available when and where customers prefer, and at the best possible price.

Every day, manufacturing engineers make decisions about technology, machinery, people, and money. The preparation for the excitement and challenge of modern manufacturing requires students to master the mathematics and applied science common to all engineering disciplines. They then will master the fundamentals of process engineering and production engineering so that they may apply these principles to production of any type of goods.

Graduates of the Manufacturing Engineering program will be able to:

  1. Solve problems relevant to modern manufacturing industries, with principal emphasis on process engineering and production engineering, as well as selected aspects of process science and the manufacturing enterprise.

  2. Design competitive manufacturing processes and production systems, integrating machinery, technology, people and money, with appropriate consideration for environmental factors, health and safety, sustainability and ethical, economic, social and political issues.

  3. Engage in effective learning in topics and areas relevant to professional advancement and to enhancing the quality of personal life.

  4. Participate effectively in multi-disciplinary teams in both leadership and followership roles.

  5. Effectively communicate complex technological concepts, issues and professional details to a variety of audiences.

Manufacturing Engineering graduates are well positioned to select career employment in any manufacturing industry. Graduates are actively recruited by companies that produce agricultural and construction machinery and vehicles, complex industrial apparatus, recreational vehicles, airplanes, household goods, building products, and both industrial and consumer electronics. Manufacturing Engineering graduates generally begin their careers designing processes and production systems or directly managing some phase of manufacturing. Frequently, they progress to increased responsibilities, with broader scope and yet more opportunity.

Manufacturing Engineering Areas of Emphasis

Students majoring in Manufacturing Engineering may prepare for specific career choices by careful use of the two technical electives and the three Engineering Science requirements included in the Manufacturing Engineering major. It is suggested that students confer with their academic adviser for assistance in choosing the most appropriate optional courses. These topical areas also are available for post-graduate study, leading to Master of Science in Manufacturing Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering degrees. For more complete details, see the Graduate Bulletin online.

Manufacturing Sequences for Non-Majors

Most industrial enterprises engage in the production of some sort of goods in some way and to some degree. Students majoring in other disciplines can enhance their career value by expanding their knowledge of process engineering and production engineering. For students majoring in other engineering disciplines or in the agricultural or physical sciences, the technological foundations of manufacturing can be acquired through Manufacturing Processes I (IME 330), Process Engineering (IME 430) and Production Engineering (IME 431). Also, engineering majors from other disciplines may elect to acquire more depth in electronics manufacturing (IME 427) and plastics and composite manufacturing (IME 432, 435).

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Manufacturing Engineering Minor

Most industrial enterprises engage in the production of some sort of goods in some way and to some degree. Students majoring in other disciplines can enhance their career value by expanding their knowledge of the technologies, processes and systems of manufacturing. A minor in Manufacturing Engineering may be earned by any student in good standing and majoring in any engineering discipline or applicable agricultural or physical sciences. Students electing to pursue this minor will be expected to have achieved the necessary pre-requisite knowledge, consisting of basic calculus, statistics and physical sciences. Students completing a minor in Manufacturing Engineering will gain highly relevant understanding of the technologies, machine tools, fixturing and tooling, and production systems employed in the manufacture of a wide variety of goods used in modern society.

Interested students are encouraged to visit with relevant faculty in the IME Department for advice on course selection to best suit their career interests.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS


Program Curriculum Guides:

Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

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NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
Undergraduate Bulletin
Phone: +1 (701) 231-7981 / Toll Free: +1 (800) 608-6378 / Fax: (701) 231-8959
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Last Updated: Tuesday, August 20, 2013 11:37:16 AM