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Title: "Preparedness: A Principled Approach to Return on Investment (Version 1.0)"
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:

Preparedness: A Principled Approach to Return on Investment (Version 1.0) presents a principle-based process to developing measures of return on investment for preparedness grant programs and also suggests a cohesive framework of outcomes that can be used to develop meaningful measures. Preparedness, applies this framework to the EMPG Program to illustrate how the framework can be used to drive objectives and measures and provides samples in Appendix A.

The paper makes the case in the document that we ought to measure what is relevant and to be relevant the measurement process and measures ought to be grounded in the Principles of Emergency Management (2007).Preparedness suggests that it is possible to do what has not been done previously—rely on principles of the field which, when applied and measured, indicate the relationship of our investments to overall preparedness. Title: "The Current NIMS Implementation Behavior of United States Counties"
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Published Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Abstract:
This study described and explained the current implementation behavior of counties in the United States with respect to the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Data were collected in two phases: 1) an internet survey was sent to a national random sample of county emergency managers and 2) a mail survey was sent to emergency managers in the sample that had not completed the internet survey. When data collection ceased, 355 randomly selected county emergency managers had participated in the study providing a nationally generalizable study. It was discovered that NIMS may be limited in its usefulness as the foundation for our nationwide emergency management system as well as its potential for use in large-scale disaster situations because of the wide variation in the manner in which NIMS is currently being implemented in counties across the United States.

Title: "Volunteer Fire Departments Perceptions of ICS and NIMS"
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Published Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Abstract:
Reports the findings from a mail survey designed to explore perceptions of the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) that was sent to volunteer fire fighters and department chiefs in Spring of 2008. The data demonstrated that both ICS and NIMS were not well perceived among responding volunteer fire chiefs and volunteer fire fighters in North Dakota. Rather than indicating issues with the ICS or NIMS systems themselves, respondents’ comments revealed concerns with the systems to be rooted in their status as volunteers and their residence in rural areas.

Title: "State Associations of Emergency Management Briefing Book" (2010) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
Provides one page briefs on state associations of emergency management. Information on state association membership, governance, activities, and benefits of membership is included.

Title: "The Form and Function of State Associations of Emergency Management" (2010) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers.
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
On June 1, 2010, IAEM-USA asked state associations of emergency management to complete a survey designed to give IAEM-USA a general sense of the form and function of the associations. The survey was also viewed as a way to begin identifying ways IAEM-ISA might formalize relationships with state associations and/or support state association efforts. The survey, hosted by Survey Monkey, remained open for completion until the 16th of July. When the survey closed, representatives from 29 out of the 43 state associations of emergency management had completed the survey for a completion rate of 67%. This very brief report summarizes the findings from the state association survey data.

Title: "Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) Use and Value" (2010) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers, US Council
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
On February 17, 2010, the Government Affairs Committee of IAEM-USA asked our regional presidents and the state associations of local emergency managers to distribute a link to a survey hosted by Survey Monkey to members in their respective areas. The survey was designed to learn about the use and value of Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) funds and the continuing impact of the economic downturn on local emergency management programs. When data collection ceased on March 3, 2010, 314 emergency managers representing 30 states had completed the survey. Most of those who completed surveys were employed full-time (76 percent) as county emergency managers (84 percent). An additional 3 percent represented village or town jurisdictions and 13 percent represented city jurisdictions. A majority (55 percent) of emergency managers represented jurisdictions with a population of less than 50,000; while, 18 percent represented jurisdictions with populations between 50,000 and 99,999, and 27 percent represented jurisdictions with a population of more than 100,000. This year marks the third consecutive year the survey has been conducted; and, as in the past, our survey questions were intended to gather data about the use and value of EMPG funds. This year the survey also included a number of additional questions about EMPG funds to gain a better understanding of the EMPG funding process. The results of this survey provide some intriguing insights into EMPG funding as it relates to local emergency management in the United States.

Title: "Impact of the Economic Downturn on Local Emergency Management Program" (2010) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers, US Council
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
On February 17, 2010, the Government Affairs Committee of IAEM-USA asked our regional presidents and the state associations of local emergency managers to distribute a link to a survey hosted by Survey Monkey to members in their respective areas. The survey was designed to learn about the use and value of Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) funds and the continuing impact of the economic downturn on local emergency management programs. When data collection ceased on March 3, 2010, 314 emergency managers representing 30 states had completed the survey. Most of those who completed surveys were employed full-time (76 percent) as county emergency managers (84 percent). An additional 3 percent represented village or town jurisdictions and 13 percent represented city jurisdictions. A majority (55 percent) of emergency managers represented jurisdictions with a population of less than 50,000; while, 18 percent represented jurisdictions with populations between 50,000 and 99,999, and 27 percent represented jurisdictions with a population of more than 100,000. The report summarize the findings from the survey questions related to the impact of the economic downturn on local emergency management programs.

Title: "NIMS in Rural America" (2009)
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
Research was conducted on how rural emergency managers at the local level understand and employ the National Incident Management System in 2007. This article focuses on research findings from face-to-face interviews with county emergency managers in three states. The data revealed that the majority of emergency managers interviewed interpret NIMS in a generally positive manner; however, they do so with considerable qualification. Emergency managers recognized that their interpretation of NIMS plays a role in how they comply with and implement NIMS; however, it was discovered that it is not the emergency managers' interpretation that determines compliance and implementation as much as it is factors related to local reality. The unique amalgamation of emergency manager interpretations and local reality produced large variation in NIMS compliance and implementation-no two emergency managers and no two counties were exactly alike. Therefore, though the federal government mandated its expectations and standards for emergency management through NIMS, both people and aspects of place dictate the mandate's interpretation and implementation. Based on findings from the research, implications of findings for emergency management are discussed and suggestions are made for future research.

Title: "Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) Use and Value" (2009) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers, US Council
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
On April 29, 2009, the Government Affairs Committee of IAEM asked our regional presidents and state associations of local emergency managers to distribute a link to an internet survey to association members in their respective areas. The short 16-question survey solicited information in two areas related to local emergency management: 1) the role of Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) funds, and 2) the impact of the economic downturn. The survey, hosted by Survey Monkey, was accessible from April 29-May 6, 2009. In total, 348 individuals completed the survey. Selected demographic information and survey limitations are in the appendix at the end of this report. The EMPG Funding Summary Report presents the findings related to role of EMPG funds in local emergency management programs.

Title: "Impact of the Economic Downturn on Local Emergency Management Programs" (2009) on behalf of the International Association of Emergency Managers, US Council
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph. D.

Abstract:
On April 29, 2009, the Government Affairs Committee of IAEM asked our regional presidents and the state associations of local emergency managers to distribute a link to an internet survey to association members in their respective areas. The short 16-question survey solicited information in two areas related to local emergency management: 1) the role of Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) funds, and 2) the impact of the economic downturn. The survey, hosted by Survey Monkey, was accessible from April 29-May 6, 2009. In total, 348 individuals completed the survey. Selected demographic information and survey limitations are in the appendix at the end of this report. The Economic Downturn Summary Report presents findings from the survey related to the current and projected impact of the economic downturn on local emergency management programs.

Title: "NIMS in Action: A Case Study of the System's Use and Utility" (2008)
Project Lead: Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.

Abstract:
Given the intent of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) mandate to alter local and state disaster operating procedures and nationally standardize disaster response across a wide array of agencies and organizations, it was important to study the degree to which its implementation has been successful. Specifically, the focus of this research project was to determine how NIMS was used in a disaster situation and to identify what factors affected the system's usefulness. Quick Response Grant research was conducted in the aftermath of a tornado in late spring 2008. Data were gathered through interviews with state and local emergency management personnel, observation at the state and local Emergency Operations Center (EOC), the collection of local and state documentation relevant to the disaster response, and publicly available news media reports. The findings of the research are presented and the relevance of the findings for both the discipline and field of emergency management are discussed.


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Last Updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 10:11:34 AM