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Nazgul Borkosheva

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Specialist, Ministry of Emergency Situation, Civil Defence Department, Kyrgyzstan
National Programme Officer, United Nations, World Food Programme

 

Current Position:
National Programme Officer, United Nations, World Food Programme

What do you value the most about the Graduate Program in Retrospect:
“I value the theoretical and practical knowledge that I gained through EMGT related courses. I also value the thesis work, which significantly enhanced my research and writing skills.”

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
“One thing that I learned in the degree program that I effectively used in my work is developing emergency response and preparedness plans.  The knowledge and skills that I gained from Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning and Business Continuity classes enables me to develop and evaluate emergency response plans.”

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Gain more practical skills besides theoretical knowledge through internships and/or volunteering for local NGO's such as American Red Cross."

Ryan Brown

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Coordinator Emergency Management, Arizona State University
State Exercise Officer, Arizona Division of Emergency Management, Preparedness Section
Deputy Assistant Director of Recovery Section, Arizona Division of Emergency Management, Recovery Section

Current Position:
Emergency Program Specialist/Project Manager, Arizona Division of Emergency Management, Recovery Section
Deputy Duty Officer, State of Arizona Certified Response Team

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"One thing I learned in the program is the importance of understanding what I call the "human factor". The NDSU program is grounded by sociology and several of the courses provided case studies and research on how individuals/communities responded to and recovered from disasters. Obtaining this knowledge and understanding has been beneficial during recent disasters that I have worked. Even though one cannot truly understand what each individual or impacted community is thinking, it is important to be able to relate to and identify with the impact population throughout the response and recovery phases."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"One thing I would recommend while still in school is to seek out opportunities to volunteer/observe the planning and conducting of both operation and discussion based exercises at various jurisdictional levels (federal/state/county/local). This is important to see how each level of government interacts with each other. It will provide networking opportunities with various EM related fields and may help the student identify what EM related [career] they would like to pursue...This also provides the student an opportunity to experience the planning process associated with exercises and "non-disaster" related job activities."

Sarah Bundy

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Preparedness and Recovery Support Manager for the American Red Cross-Dakotas Region
Lecturer/Adjunct Professor in the Emergency Management Department at North Dakota State University
Visiting Assistant Professor, Emergency Management Department at North Dakota State University

Current Position:
Visiting Assistant Professor, Emergency Management Department at North Dakota State University

What You Value Most About the Graduate Program in Retrospect:
“I appreciate the research and literature-based approach used by the graduate program. The synthesis of findings from a variety of disciplines related to emergency management topics helped me to understand how we create, cope, and interact with hazards and related events. I also valued the analysis and critical thinking skills that I had the opportunity to learn and practice throughout the program.”

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
“Understanding the various priorities and perspectives of different stakeholder groups, the activities in which those groups can be involved, and the extent to which those activities are being pursued/completed by the different groups has helped me in setting appropriate and realistic programmatic and individual goals.”

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“The education piece is certainly important, so do your best and learn as much as you can in each of your courses. Take advantage of opportunities both through the program and outside the program to enhance what you are learning in the classroom…be involved in student organizations, attend conferences, take on challenging internship opportunities, volunteer in EM-related organizations, etc. Identify your professional goals and start networking to find individuals who can help you meet those goals.” 

Regine Laurence Chauvet

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Emergency Management Planner, Seminole Tribe of Florida
Emergency Management Coordinator, Seminole Tribe of Florida

Current Position:
Emergency Management Coordinator, Seminole Tribe of Florida

 What You Value Most About the Graduate Program in Retrospect:
“The opportunity to learn and dedicate my time to finding answers to problem that matter to the field. Being a practitioner, your focus changes completely to what affects your community, your organization, and your life. You no longer have the time to contemplate issues facing the field or find out the “why?” of things or what you can do about it. Everyone is looking to you for a tangible item that they can check off their list. The graduate program takes you beyond that, it broadens your perspectives, surrounds you with people passionate about the field who are willing to discuss its aspects, and gives you the tools to enable you to analyze trends and find solutions. You don’t have time for that outside of that environment. And research databases. Trust me, you’ll miss not having access to those articles once you see the price of a journal subscription.”

 One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
“Emergency management is a distributed function and thus relationships are extremely important. The program at NDSU highlights the distributed function that is emergency management and being a practitioner you will realize that very quickly. I’m glad the program emphasized this and the importance of relationships as it saved me a lot of time and frustration. When you build relationships with those actually responsible for doing the tasks that are important to your program you will see the ripple effects of change throughout your community. Without understanding those 2 key principles, you won’t get much, if anything, done out in the field.”

Alex Cole-Corde

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Environmental Protection Specialist for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA): Disaster Assistance Employee (DAE) and Cadre of On-call Response/Recovery Employee (CORE).

 Current Position:
Environmental Protection Specialist for FEMA: CORE.

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
“Working on real world projects with emergency management, community, and others within the context of group/team assignments. I work daily with different departments of FEMA and other Federal/State agencies. It is important to know how to work effectively with diverse individuals from Federal/State/Tribal/local governments and agencies, voluntary agencies, FEMA applicants, the general public, et cetera to productively develop, process, and complete funding eligible projects.  Learning to work well in a team environment with real world deadlines and consequences is essential to effectively work in emergency management. Through internships, community-based assignments, and real world experience NDSU Emergency Management Department strives to equip students with the practical and applicable knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully compete in a tough job market.”

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Get as much experience and trainings in emergency management as possible. Look for experience working, interning, volunteering, and training with public, private, and/or nonprofit sector entities. Have a working knowledge of applicable laws, regulations, policies, grant programs, et cetera. Prepare to be flexible in structured environments and structured in flexible environments. Learn to work well others from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Network, make, and maintain contacts in the field. Know that you do not know everything about emergency management. The most important thing: act professional and treat others well. Be aware that the emergency management community is small; how you act and treat others will follow you throughout your career. “

 Jared Huibregtse

EM Positions held since Graduation:
Assistant State NFIP Coordinator, ND State Water Commission

Current Position:
Assistant State (ND) NFIP Coordinator, ND State Water Commission 

What do you value the most about the Graduate Program in Retrospect:
“Two-Part answer: 1) The program forced me to think critically at a much higher level than I had before.  Getting used to this way of analyzing issues has made other tasks projects make more sense, and seem more routine.  2) The NDSU EM program provided me with a “big picture” understanding of EM and knowledge about how it is connected to so many other facets of society, culture, government, and life in general.”  

 One thing learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“The NFIP is not understood by nearly the number of people it should be.  Outside agents (media, realtors) misinterpret—deliberately or not—the Program’s benefits.”

 What every student should do to prepare for a career in EM:
“Take all opportunities to learn how to work with different people/personalities.  Learn about where they are from/what they do for a living and see if there is a connection between that and EM.  Chances are you will be able to see several parallels because the world of EM is so immense. “

Marc Katchadourian

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
James Lee Witt Associates, a private sector Emergency Management Consulting firm
Senior Emergency Management Coordinator , Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH), Bureau of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency  Response.

Current Position:
Senior Emergency Management Coordinator , Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH), Bureau of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency  Response and Public Health Liaison to the Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communications (OEMC).

 One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
It is difficult to pick only one thing, but, there was significant value in learning Emergency Management research methods and theory because they construct my approach to understanding complex situations, solving problems, and making effective decisions. The NDSU Emergency Management graduate program taught me how to make empirically-based decisions that allow me to achieve successful outcomes on preparedness projects and in emergency operations.

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
Whether a student aims to be a practitioner or an academic in Emergency Management, it is critical to understand the history of the field, its evolution, and its theoretical foundation. Regardless of the level, Bachelors, Masters, or PhD, every student must leave a program knowing what Emergency Management truly is and its role in various environments. 

Kim Kirschner

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Municipal Planning Specialist, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety
Emergency Management Coordinator, Cheltenham Township
Adjunct Professor, Contractor, Montgomery County Community College

 Current Position:
Emergency Management Coordinator, Cheltenham Township
Adjunct Professor, Montgomery County Community College

 One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"Everything! If I had to pick one thing from my time at NDSU that really stands out, it would be the open forum for in-depth discussions between peers and faculty. I teach my classes in a similar format..."

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Internship! Also, a ride along with local police, fire, and ems would be super beneficial. When I came to the county department of public safety I knew nothing about radios, dispatching, and first response. I knew about mitigation and social theory!! The fire wackers weren't impressed that I know about...chaos theory! I feel it would have been beneficial to spend time (maybe a 3 credit course) on 'EMP: understanding the first responders' [in which students would] tour the local 9-1-1- center, have guest speakers in, etcetera."

Jeanine Neipert

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Disaster Assistance Employee (various job titles), Federal Emergency Management Agency
CORE Mitigation Planning Specialist, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Region VIII, Mitigation Division
Hazard Mitigation Branch Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency National Incident Management Assistance Team—East 2

Current Position:
Hazard Mitigation Branch Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency National Incident Management Assistance Team—East 2

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"The research I conducted as part of my thesis provided insight into how individuals perceive and experience federal programs."

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Every student should become familiar with the Stafford Act and the regulations outlined in 44 CFR, and recognize the importance of establishing and maintaining solid working relationships."

Jeff Reibestein

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
None.

Current Position:
Deputy Surgeon, 82nd Airborne Division, United States Army, Fort Bragg, NC

 One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"The program reinforced my belief in the importance of relationships/networking/group interaction -- fundamentals of my current service in the U.S. Army."

 What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Keep an open mind. Emergency management is a broad spectrum of principles, thoughts, and activities." 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Last Updated: Thursday, January 15, 2015 10:55:30 AM