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Jensen Gives Presentation to Center for Disaster Education and Research at Millersville University

Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Management, gave a presentation on April 11, 2014 at 1:00p.m. EST to faculty and students at the Center for Disaster Education and Research at Millersville University. The presentation, entitled, "NIMS: Possibilities and Portents", examined whether it is likely that NIMS will the goals it was developed to address in light of the history of disaster research and research on NIMS specifically. Research on incident management systems has been a significant focus of Jensen's work and she is one of the few scholars conducting empirical research on the topic.

Articles by Jensen Published

Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Management, recently had the article she co-authored with William Waugh, Professor, of Georgia Tech University, published in a special issue of the Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management dedicated to the incident command system. The article by Jensen and Waugh, entitled, "The United States' Experience wiht the Incident Command System: What We Think We Know and What We Need to Know More About", was invited and the lead article in volume 22, number 1 of the Journal.

An article Jensen collaborated on with former graduate students, Sarah Bundy, Brian Thomas, and Mariama Yakubu, was also recently published in the International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters. The article, entitled, "The County Emergency Managers Role in Disaster Recovery", relates the findings from interviews with 54 county emergency managers in 11 states regarding their perceived role in disaster recovery. The article was published in March 2014 in volume 32, issue 1.

Presentation on Emergency Management and The Casselton Train Derailment: What If It Happened in Fargo?

Dave Rogness, Cass County Emergency Services manager, discussed the Casselton train derailment on Tuesday, April 1, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Room of Nations. Dave Rogness' presentation explored how the incident, how it was managed, and what the consequences would be if a similar type event were to happen in a more urban area, specifically, Fargo. This presentation was the second in a presentation series examining the emergency management issues related to the booming oil industry in the state of North Dakota.

North Dakota Department of Emergency Services Director Speaks to Emergency Management Students

Greg Wilz, North Dakota Homeland Security Division director, is scheduled to host a discussion of emergency management issues related to the Bakken oil patch on Monday, March 24, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. at NDSU’s Memorial Union Plains room.

The discussion, presented by the NDSU Department of Emergency Management, is the first in a series of scheduled speakers at the top levels of local and state emergency services organizations.

“While oil has brought with it many positive economic benefits, it has also created or exacerbated emergency management concerns at the local and state level,” said Carol Cwiak, assistant professor of emergency management. “The Department of Emergency Management’s upcoming speaker series seeks to foster discussion about, and create awareness of, some of those concerns.”

The increase in oil industry activity in western North Dakota has increased demand on all levels of infrastructure. These demands and the introduction of new oil-related hazards make emergency management even more important for businesses, government and private entities, Cwiak said.

Cwiak said the recent Casselton, N.D., derailment and crude oil transport incidents in Canada and Alabama within six months of each other should serve as a wake-up call.

“Preparing for, mitigating against, responding to, and recovering from these incidents require the collaboration of many agencies and partners,” Cwiak said. “And creating the framework for that collaboration is the responsibility of emergency management.”

Also scheduled in the series, Paul Laney, Cass County sheriff, and Dave Rogness, Cass County Emergency Services manager, will discuss the Casselton train derailment on Tuesday, April 1, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Room of Nations.

New EMGT Courses to be Offered Fall 2014

The Department of Emergency Management will be teaching their own section of research methods this fall semester.  The course will be listed on Campus Connection when registration opens later this spring.  This course will substitute for Soc 340/341.  Here is what to look for:

EMGT 390 Research Methods 1:00-1:50 MWF 3 credits (Students must select a lab section to go with the course)
EMGT 390 Lab Section 1 9:00-9:50  Monday + Hours
EMGT 390 Lab Section 2 9:00-9:50 Wednesday + Hours

The methodology course will be primarily taught by Professor Dan Klenow with selected topics covered by Professor George Youngs.  This course will use Emergency Management examples, variables and topics to put the material in context.

In the fall EMGT 490 Advanced Business Continuity will also be offered.  It will meet on a T/Th schedule from 12:30 to 1:45.  Professor Carol Cwiak will teach the course.  This course will be added to the electives list for the major.

EMGT 490 Advanced Business Continuity T.TH 12:30-1:45 

Klenow Presents at Conference

Daniel J. Klenow, Ph.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Emergency Management gave an invited two hour plenary session presentation entitled:  Emergency Management:  Perspectives on Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery on January 28th for the 2014 North Dakota Urban and Community Forestry Association Annual Conference.  The conference brings together over 300 participants from the green industry – foresters, arborists, state and federal government, city and local representatives, park districts, planners, landscape architects and designers, commercial landscapers, nurseries, and many others. 

Two New Emergency Management Doctoral Degree Holders

Fall 2014 two students graduated with their doctoral degree in Emergency Management. We offer our heartfelt congratulations to Drs. Mariama Yakubu and Sarah Bundy the eighth and ninth persons to be granted the degree from our department. Dr. Bundy conducted her research on coordination in disaster recovery and Dr. Yakubu on the development of emergency management higher education and training programs in Ghana.

Masters Student Research Progress Summer/Fall 2013

Summer and Fall 2013 were productive for our master's students. Five students successfully defended their research proposals and one additional student defended his final work. Master's students are conducting research on emergent recovery groups post-Katrina, how Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are leveraged within local emergency management systems, the disaster recovery process of the elderly, and the creation and maintenance of Local Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (LVOADs). All five students are expected to complete their research and graduate Spring 2014.

Undergraduates Graduate Fall 2013

Department of Emergency Management faculty and students wish to recognize and congratulate the following 11 undergraduate students who graduated this fall:

Hiroshi Asato

Makkah Asindua

Scott Bausch

Erin Busta

Lee Dhein

Seth Jones

Michael Paolini

Andrew Puckett

Christopher Runge

Matthew Siegel

Andrew Sprague

 

We wish each of our graduates the best as they pursue their emergency management careers!

 

 

Emergency Management Faculty to Author Textbook

Daniel J. Klenow, Jessica Jensen, George A. Youngs, and Gary Goreham have received a contract from Elsevier Publishing’s Butterworth-Heinemann subdivision to publish the first textbook on research methods for Emergency Management.  Butterworth-Heinemann is the publisher of  the top selling introductory texts for Emergency Management as well as Homeland Security. 

Faculty Actively Engaged in Publishing

This year has been a strong one for Department of Emergency Management faculty when it comes to publishing. For instance, Jessica Jensen, an Assistant Professor in the Department, has had 4 articles accepted for publication in scholarly, peer-reviewed outlets as in addition to an invited, peer-reviewed book chapter. The forthcoming publications include:

  • Jensen, J., & Thompson, S. (forthcoming). The Incident Command System: A literature review. Disasters.
  • Jensen, J. & Waugh, W. (forthcoming). "The Incident Command System: What we think we know and what we need to know more about" for special issue of Journal of Crises and Contingencies Management.
  • Jensen, J. & Youngs, G. (forthcoming). Explaining NIMS implementation behavior. Disasters.
  • Jensen, J., Bundy, S., Thomas, B., & Yakubu, M.. (forthcoming). The county emergency managers role in disaster recovery.  International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters.
  • Jensen, J. (forthcoming). “Reflections on NIMS”. In J. Trainor and T. Subbio (eds.), Issues in disaster science and management. Washington, DC: FEMA. INVITED CONTRIBUTION

Contributing to the emergency management body of knowledge through the conduct of research and dissemination of related results is a top priority for the Department. Be on the lookout for more announcements of accepted manuscripts in the near future!

Jensen Develops Emergency Management Research Resource Guide for FEMA Higher Education Program

On behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Higher Education Program, Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor, developed a research resource guide to demystify the landscape of emergency management literature for students and faculty alike. The guide is organized in keeping with the 2013 Draft Research Standards Research Standards for the Academic Discipline of Emergency Management (available at https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/edu/emTheoryResearch.asp). The Standards suggest that the most desirable source of literature for research in emergency management are those pieces that report the findings of empirical research in peer-reviewed journals and books and that other sources, while often important in the research process, ought to be considered secondary or tertiary. Thus, the guide organizes the literature in three categories: primary, secondary, and tertiary, outlines various sources in each category, and discussed how those sources might be accessed. Because many students and faculty associated with emergency management programs may be interested in exploring topics related to the sub-fields of homeland security, business continuity, and humanitarian assistance, some resources related to these sub-fields are provided in three appendixes to this guide. Download the Research Resource Guide!

Center for Disaster Studies and Emergency Management Sponsors Series on Methods and Emergency Management Research

The Center for Disaster Studies and Emergency Management has begun to take a more active role in providing expanded educational experiences for graduate students in the area of methodology.  The primary goal of this increased activity is to bring methods and methodological issues into an emergency management research context.

  1. Fundamentals of Sampling:  What EM Graduate Students Need To Know: Discussed fundamental types of sampling (probability and non-probability) and the relationship of these techniques to broader issues of emergency management research designs and objectives.
  2. Qualitative Methodology:  What Are Your Options: Reviewed the primary designs for doing qualitative work including interviews, focus groups, observational studies, participate observation approaches, and mixed methods.
  3. Demystifying Qualitative Analysis: Discussed fundamentals of qualitative analysis including coding and means of ensuring rigor.
  4. Community Research:  An Application for Emergency Management: Reviewed the basics of community assessment.
  5. Secret Strategies for Operationalizing Concepts through Nominal and Ordinal Questions:  What The Textbooks Don’t Tell You: Discussed how to determine when you should use simple yes/no questions and when you should use a Likert scale.  Anchored scale options (descriptors at each end of the scale only) were compared to scales with labels for each value.  Each measurement option was placed within the context of the research objectives for various projects.

 

 

 

Faculty Present in FEMA Webinar

Jessica Jensen and Daniel J. Klenow co-presented a national webinar on general education and emergency management on November 21st for FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute, National Emergency Training Center, Emmitsburg, MD.  The presentation focused on the format and content of NDSU’s introductory course EMGT 101 Emergencies, Disasters and Catastrophes including the history of the course’s evolution, general education approval, and how other institutions could utilize this model on their campuses.  The implications of such a curricular change for increasing awareness of hazards, risks and individual, organizational, and societal vulnerabilities among a larger cross-section of undergraduates was also discussed.

Jensen Teaches at Royal Roads University

Jessica Jensen, assistant professor and Associate Director of the Center for Disaster Studies and Emergency Management, served as an in-residence faculty member for the Emergency Management master’s degree program at Royal Roads University, in Victoria, British Columbia.  Professor Jensen spent 5 days at the Royal Roads campus in October teaching an intensive graduate course on comprehensive planning for Emergency Management.  Professor Jensen has been invited to return to Royal Roads University in the spring.

New Faculty Member Publishes Grant Report

Yue ‘Gurt’ Ge, new assistant professor of the Department of Emergency Management, co-authored a technical report, titled “Valley Hurricane Evacuation Study:  Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo Counties, Texas”, with colleagues from the Hazard Reduction & Recovery Center at Texas A&M University. The study examined hurricane evacuation expectations, evacuation logistics, and hurricane preparedness and mitigation activities for the general urban population and the rural population of selected counties  in the Lower Rio Grande Valley near the Mexico-U.S. border. The project was funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Training Held: Preparing for the Master's Comp Exam

Within two weeks of the end of their second semester in the Department of Emergency Management's Master's degree program, all students take an oral comprehensive exam. The comprehensive exam is attended by all Department faculty. During the comprehensive exam, Department faculty ask students three of the following questions:

  1. Define the concept of sustainability; explain how the disaster literature has explored the concept; and, articulate how the concept relates to the practice of emergency management.
    • Define the concept of resilience; explain how the disaster literature has explored the concept; and, articulate how the concept relates to the practice of emergency management.
    • Define the concept of vulnerability; explain how the disaster literature has explored the concept; and, articulate how the concept relates to the practice of emergency management.
    • Define the concept of hazard event; explain how the disaster literature has explored the concept; and, articulate how the concept relates to the practice of emergency management.
    • Define the concept of stakeholder; explain how the disaster literature has explored the concept; and, articulate how the concept relates to the practice of emergency management.
    • Tell us about some of the key response research findings and how those findings can inform emergency management practice.
    • Tell us about some of the key recovery research findings and how those findings can inform emergency management practice.
    • Tell us about some of the key mitigation research findings and how those findings can inform emergency management practice.
    • Tell us about some of the key preparedness research findings and how those findings can inform emergency management practice.
    • Tell us about the primary political challenges facing emergency management.
    • Explain why disasters are experienced differently from country-to-country.
    • Explain why we see differences in emergency management across countries.
    • Describe the evolution of emergency management research.
    • Describe the evolution of emergency management policy.
    • Describe the evolution of the emergency management profession.

Students are expected to deliver a 10-15 minute response to each of the questions they are asked with evidence to support their responses drawn from course lectures/notes, course reading assignments, and the following books:  

  •  Burby, R. (ed). (1998). Cooperating with nature: Confronting natural hazards with land-use planning for sustainable communities. Washington, DC: John Henry Press.
    • Cutter, S. (ed) (2001). American hazardscapes: The regionalization of hazards and disasters. Washington, DC: John Henry Press.
    • Mileti, D. (ed)  (1999). Disasters by design: A reassessment of natural hazards in the United States. Washington, DC: John Henry Press.
    • National Research Council of the National Academes.  (2006). Facing hazards and disasters: Understanding human dimensions. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
    • Rubin, C. (ed) (2007). Emergency Management: The American experience 1900-2006. PERI.
    • Sylves, R. (2008). Disaster policy & politics. Washington, DC: CQ Press.
    • Tierney, K., Lindell, M., & Perry, R. (2001). Facing the unexpected: Disaster preparedness and response in the United States. Washington, DC: John Henry Press.
    • Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T., & Davis, I. (2004). At risk: Natural hazards, people’s vulnerability and disasters. New York: Routledge.

Because the oral exam experience is new to many master's level students, Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator, held a "training session" related to how to prepare for the comprehensive exam for incoming master's students on Friday, August 24th.  The training addressed how to study for the comp., what to expect during the comp., how grading of the comp. works, and more.

Department of Emergency Management Holds Graduate Orientation

On Wednesday, August 28 the Department of Emergency Management held its annual graduate orientation. All faculty and new graduate students were in attendance as were a number of students who have been in the program more than a year. The orientation included introductions of students, faculty, and staff, a review of expectations associated with the graduate program at NDSU, milestones in the program, departmental and Graduate School policies and more.  The Department views the orientation as one of the most important things it can do to support student success in the program.

Jensen Facilitates FEMA Higher Education Focus Groups

The FEMA Higher Education Project sponsored two focus groups in 2012 to support the higher education community’s efforts to formalize emergency management as an academic discipline. One focus group grappled with defining what emergency management is and does as a discipline (known as the disciplinary purview group); and, the other wrestled with what the research standards should be for the emerging discipline (known as the research standards group). Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor, facilitated both of these groups.  

In 2013, the FEMA Higher Education Program again demonstrated its support of the higher education community’s disciplinary efforts by sponsoring two additional focus groups; and, Jensen again facilitated the groups. The first group, held July 23-24, 2013, was a follow-up to the 2012 Disciplinary Purview group and was intended to build upon its work. Specifically, the group’s task was to identify the body of scholarship and research related to emergency management’s purview that could ground the discipline, particularly as relates to the education of students. The focus group had two days of robust and productive discussion resulted in a report that briefly reviews the group’s discussion and includes appendices that identify the areas and topics about which scholarship and research exist to support student education, a range of professional development opportunities students might pursue depending on their intended emergency management career path, and skills students should be able to demonstrate upon graduating from emergency management degree programs. The second focus group was a follow-up to the 2012 Research Standards group and intended to build upon its work. Specifically, the group’s task was to explore how to transition the research standards into practice within individual emergency management degree programs and across the higher education community as a whole. The reports of both group efforts can be found at https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/edu/emTheoryResearch.asp.

 

Jensen Participates in 2nd Emergency Management Higher Education Accreditation Focus Group

In 2012, a group of emergency management academics and program representatives gathered at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD on September to discuss and debate accreditation issues. Jessica Jensen, Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Management at NDSU, participated in the focus group. The outcome of the 2012 focus group was to solicit the opinion of the wider emergency management higher education community regarding whether accreditation should be pursued, and, if so, what entity should lead accreditation. A second focus group was convened in 2013 to build on the work of the 2012 group and the results of a survey conducted to solicit the opinions of the higher education community. Jensen again participated in the group. The 2013 group began outline a potential process for accreditation and draft a set of general program and facilities standards that might be used. Drafts of the process and general standards will be shared with the community in the coming months.

Jensen Conducts Survey on Accreditation in Emergency Management

Following a focus group on accreditation in emergency management sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Higher Education Program last year, Jensen was tasked by the Program with surveying the emergency management higher education community regarding its interest in pursuing the development of accreditation. Jensen's survey data revealed that the higher education community is generally interested in pursuing accreditation but differs regarding which entity ought to do the accrediting. The results of the survey will inform the second focus group on accreditation that meets in July.

Department Faulty Win Awards

Carol Cwiak, Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Management, was awarded the North Dakota State University College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Outstanding Service Award in recognition of her significant and ongoing contributions to the university, local area, state, and nation. Jessica Jensen, also an Assistant Professor in the Department, was awarded the Outstanding Research Award for her research accomplishments.

Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

HOLIDAY – April 18-21, Spring Recess, no classes.

EMSA Meeting – April 23. Room and time TBD. New officers will conduct this meeting.

“Taking Stock and Taking Action: Disaster Research and the Challenges Ahead” Disaster Research Center 50th Anniversary Workshop and Celebration – April 30-May 3 at Clayton Hall at the University of Delaware. Learn more and register.

Effective Communications: Jamestown Course – May 7 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Jamestown City hall in Jamestown, ND. Learn more and register.

EMSA Meeting – May 7. Room and time TBD. Last EMSA meeting of the year.

Last day of classes – May 9.

Local Volunteer and Donations Management G288 – May 12 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Hennepin County Emergency Preparedness Office in Medina, MN. Learn more and register

Final examinations – May 12-16.

Essentials of Community Cyber Security Course – May 13 from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Comfort Inn in Bismarck, ND. Learn more and register.

The EOC’s Role in Community Cyber Security Course – May 13-14 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Comfort Inn in Bismarck, ND. Learn more and register.

First Theory and Research Worshop - June 2 from 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD. Learn more and register.

16th FEMA Higher Education Symposium - June 3-5 at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD. Learn more and register.

39th Annual Natural Hazards Research and Application Workshop – June 22-25 at the Omni Interlocken Resort in Broomfield, Colorado. Learn more and register.

EMGT Student Newsletter

EMGT Student is a student-written newsletter published by the Emergency Management Program. Links to the current and past editions of the newsletter are posted below.

Volume One

Volume Two

Volume Three

Volume Four

Volume Five

Volume Six

Volume Seven

Volume Eight


Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

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Last Updated: Friday, April 11, 2014 4:01:32 PM