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The Department of Emergency Management has an eclectic mix of undergraduate students who are excited about emergency management and commited to facilitating growth and change within the field within its face-to-face program. Through class projects, internships, and the student organization IEMSA, students contribute both to the campus and the Fargo/Moorhead community.

The Department of Emergency Management at NDSU offers both a major and minor in emergency management.

What Emergency Management Students Study

For a transcript of this video, please go to this page

What You Can Do with an Emergency Management Degree

Numerous career opportunities are available to those graduating with an emergency management major. Positions are available at all levels of government including city, county, state, and federal. A wide variety of local, national, and international voluntary organizations routinely hire people trained in emergency management, and there is increasing emphasis on hiring emergency managers in the private, business sector.

Recent program graduates found employment as a regional emergency planner, homeland security planner, hospital emergency manager, emergency manager with the National Guard, disaster insurance adjuster and academic associate for an emergency management program in the southwest.

Learn more about Emergency Management as a career path:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics information about emergency management including sectors that emergency managers are employed in, pay, and projected growth of employment in emergency management.

Recent news story about an emergency management career: U.S. News Lists Emergency Management as one of the 50 best careers of 2011.

Many undergraduates also have chosen to go on for a master?s degree. In light of the continuing need to manage natural and technological disasters and current homeland security issues, there will be an increasing need for educated and highly skilled emergency managers.

Of note, just as with any degree program in higher education, an emergency management student does not graduate and necessarily go on to be an emergency manager. Many graduates from our degree program go on to work in fields outside of emergency management. The skills and knowledge acquired through our undergraduate degree program in emergency management are highly marketable to other professions and fields.

For instance, all undergraduate courses emphasize written and oral communication--highly valued skills in virtually any field. Undergraduate coursework also provides students multiple opportunities to engage in collaborative, cooperative activity, demonstrate leadership, hone the ability to conduct critical analysis, find, synthesize, and integrate information from multiple sources, and develop and implement projects. Each of these skills are highly sought after by those hiring in the public, private, and nongovernmental sectors.

Emergency Management Major Learning Objectives

By the time a student graduates with a major in emergency management from North Dakota State University's Department of Emergency Management, the student should be able to demonstrate:

  • Historical awareness of emergency management
  • Effective written communication
  • Effective oral communication
  • Effective interpersonal communication
  • Effective group communication
  • Effective collaboration
  • Knowledge  of management concepts and practices
  • Understanding of the professional and ethical standards of the profession
  • Understanding of key concepts integral to the academic discipline
  • Familiarity with key emergency management laws, regulations, and policies
  • Knowledge of leadership concepts and practices (e.g., advocacy and influence)
  • Understanding of emergency management stakeholder groups
  • Knowledge of common emergency management partner relationships
  • Familiarity with emergency management technologies
  • Knowledge of the role of research for informing practice
  • Awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of various research methodologies for application in emergency management

Emergency Management Major Requirements

Students seeking to major in emergency management will complete courses in the following areas: Emergency Management Core (25 credits), Methods Core (10 credits), and Emergency Management Electives (12 credits).

Emergency Management Core (All Courses Required):
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 261: Disaster Preparedness (prereq: EMGT 101)
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation (prereq: EMGT 101)
EMGT 263: Disaster Response (prereq: EMGT 101)
EMGT 291: Career and Professional Development
EMGT 264: Disaster Recovery (prereq: EMGT 101)
EMGT 414: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
EMGT 430: Socio-Behavioral Foundations of Emergency Management
EMGT 496: Emergency Management Internship

Sociology Core (All Courses Required):
SOC 110: Introduction to Sociology
STAT 330: Introduction to Statistics
SOC 340: Sociology Research Methods (prerequisite or corequisite: STAT 330)
SOC 341: Sociology Research Methods Lab (prerequisite or corequisite: STAT 330)

Emergency Management Electives (Choose Four Courses):
EMGT 150: Homeland Security: An Exploration 
EMGT 410: Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning (prerequisites: EMGT 101, 1 phase course)
EMGT 420: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment (prerequisite: EMGT 414)
EMGT 425: International Emergency Management
EMGT 435: Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
EMGT445: Vulnerability and Functional Needs in Emergency Management
EMGT 461: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 463: Voluntary Agency Disaster Services
EMGT 481: Disaster Analysis
EMGT 491: Seminar (Various Topics)

Minors that Complement an Emergency Management Major

The College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences requires all students to have a minor or two years of a foreign language to complete their degree requirements.  Typically, emergency management students select the option of completing a minor.  The foreign language option may be wise choice for a student interested in international emergency management. 

The selection of one or more minors can be a very effective way to enhance your employability by developing a knowledge base and skill sets that compliment and expand the application of your emergency management degree.

Recommended minors include: Business Administration, Communication, Community Development, Geography, Political Science, Construction Management, Economics, Criminal Justice, Sociology, and Hospitality and Tourism Management among others.

For example, a major in emergency management and a minor in business would prepare a student to work in business continuity which is a growing career in the private sector. A major in emergency management and a minor in construction management would prepare a student to help companies and communities with disaster resistant construction.

Theoretically, almost any minor could provide value and enhance employability in some sector of emergency management. Students are encouraged to be creative in exploring one or more minor options.

Emergency Management Minor Requirements

As of this academic year we have four Emergency Management minor options. 

Option 1 is titled Comprehensive Emergency Management and it includes all of the hazard cycle/disaster phase courses of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery as well as our introductory course and one upper division elective.  This minor recognizes that some students may want the breadth of coverage that an all phase curriculum can provide. 

Emergency Management is described in the literature as a “distributed function”.  That means that many diverse units, organizations, professions, and groups are engaged in some aspect of emergency management but not all functions.  Accordingly, we have created a series of three new minors that link key courses that relate to specific groups, or within the university environment – majors, that are most likely to benefit from a focused configuration of courses that link to the specific “distributed function” that they typically engage in.  For example, law enforcement personnel (today’s criminal justice majors) are typically engaged in response activities as well as preparedness but not typically in mitigation and long-term recovery work.  Thus option 2 is appropriate for students with that interest.

Option 2 is titled Preparedness and Response and this option is designed for students who have majors that place them in possible response/responder orientations or who work in response type of organization (public health, fire service, law enforcement, homeland security, Red Cross, etc).  Thus, this minor may be attractive to those majoring in health related majors, criminal justice, communication, sociology, and other social and some physical science majors.

Option 3 is titled Mitigation and Recovery and it includes courses that address issues for those who are involved in reducing disaster potential as well as longer term recovery from such events.  Those involved in planning professions and infrastructure related fields would benefit from the courses in this minor.  This would include those in natural resource management, construction management, engineering, architecture, design, political science, sociology, biological science/environmental science, geology, and related fields.

Option 4 is titled International Emergency Management and it focuses on response and recovery issues as that is a way in which we frequently engage with other countries who are impacted by disasters and catastrophes.  This minor configuration is especially appropriate for those majoring in a modern language, international studies, sociology, psychology, communication, political science/comparative, or any undergraduate major having a human service focus.

Here is the link to these Emergency Management minors:

http://www.ndsu.edu/fileadmin/registrar/curricula/ahss/emm-minor.pdf

Advising Sheets

The advising sheets for the emergency management major and minor can be found here.

Emergency Management Course Schedule

Download Emergency Management Course Schedule.

2014-2015

 

Fall
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 261: Disaster Preparedness
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation
EMGT 264: Disaster Recovery
EMGT 391: Emergency Management Research Methods
EMGT 414/614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
EMGT 435/635: Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
EMGT 491: Advanced Business Continuity
EMGT 764: Recovery Theory and Practice

Spring
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 150: Homeland Security
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation
EMGT 263: Disaster Response
EMGT 291: Career and Professional Development
EMGT 410/610: Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning
EMGT 430: Socio-Behavioral Foundations of Emergency Management
EMGT 461/661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 445/645: Vulnerability and Functional Needs in Emergency Management
EMGT 720: Emergency Management Theory
EMGT 762: Mitigation Theory and Practice

2015-2016

Fall
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 261: Disaster Preparedness
EMGT 264: Disaster Recovery
EMGT 414/614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
EMGT 425/625: International Emergency Management
EMGT 491: Advanced Business Continuity
EMGT 763: Response Theory and Practice

Spring
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation
EMGT 263: Disaster Response
EMGT 291: Career and Professional Development
EMGT 420/620: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment
EMGT 430: Socio-Behavioral Foundations of Emergency Management
EMGT 461/661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 463/663: Voluntary Agency Services in Disaster
EMGT 730: Advanced Research Methods
EMGT 761: Preparedness Theory and Practice

2016-2017

Fall
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 261: Disaster Preparedness
EMGT 264: Disaster Recovery
EMGT 414/614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
EMGT 435/635: Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
EMGT 491: Advanced Business Continuity
EMGT 764: Recovery Theory and Practice

Spring
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 150: Homeland Security
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation
EMGT 263: Disaster Response
EMGT 291: Career and Professional Development
EMGT 410/610: Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning
EMGT 430: Socio-Behavioral Foundations of Emergency Management
EMGT 461/661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 445/645: Vulnerability and Functional Needs in Emergency Management
EMGT 720: Emergency Management Theory
EMGT 762: Mitigation Theory and Practice

2017-2018

Fall
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 261: Disaster Preparedness
EMGT 264: Disaster Recovery
EMGT 414/614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
EMGT 425/625: International Emergency Management
EMGT 463/663: Voluntary Agency Services in Disaster
EMGT 491: Advanced Business Continuity
EMGT 761: Preparedness Theory and Practice

Spring
EMGT 101: Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes
EMGT 262: Disaster Mitigation
EMGT 263: Disaster Response
EMGT 291: Career and Professional Development
EMGT 420/620: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment
EMGT 430: Socio-Behavioral Foundations of Emergency Management
EMGT 461/661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 730: Advanced Research Methods
EMGT 763: Response Theory and Practice

Description of Courses Offered

Download the Description of Undergraduate Emergency Management Courses Offered.

101 Emergencies, Disasters, and Catastrophes 3
An overview of emergencies, disasters, and catastrophes from a social, political, historical, policy, environmental, international and cross-cultural perspective. Focuses on differences in these events in terms of scale as well as cause from the disaster phase approach.

150 Homeland Security: An Exploration 3
Examines the historical emergence of security threats and how American society has addressed them. Topics include key homeland security concerns and approaches, events, policies, and organizational structures (such as the Department of Homeland Security).

261 Disaster Preparedness 3
Nature and rationale for public awareness of potential hazards that communities face, preparedness for these hazards, and potential strategies to mitigate adverse consequences. Prereq: EMGT 101.

262 Disaster Mitigation 3
Role of emergency management programs in community resilience and sustainability; incorporation of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery in community comprehensive and strategic planning. Prereq: EMGT 101.

263 Disaster Response 3
Principles and procedures related to emergency operations plans, warning, evacuation, search and rescue, mass casualty care, sheltering, donations, management, disaster declaration, and incident debriefing. Prereq: EMGT 101.

264 Disaster Recovery 3
Examination of post-disaster policies and programs that protect the natural environment, improve disaster resistance, support diverse populations, improve economic conditions, and preserve community resources. Prereq: EMGT 101.

410 Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning 3
Educates students in the preparation of various types of emergency management plans and how to lead a planning process within non-profits, businesses, and/or government organizations

414 Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management 3
This course is designed to provide emergency management students with specific disaster related applications of spatial analysis techniques in state of the art GIS software

420 Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment 3
Educates students in the preparation of hazard, risk, and vulnerability assessment

425 International Emergency Management 3
Explores hazard events, emergency management processes and structures, and how they vary around the world. Prerequisite: EMGT 101 for Undergraduates.

435 Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management 3
An analysis of homeland security and its relationship to emergency management within the framework of evolving domestic and international hazards.

SOC 443 - International Disasters 3
Impacts of natural and human-made disasters on industrialized and developing societies; relief and reconstruction post-disaster programs.

445 Vulnerability and Functional Needs in Emergency Management 3
Using the framework of vulnerability theory this course examines research related to groups that have been historically labeled “special populations” and how their functional needs might be addressed through emergency management.

461 Business Continuity and Crisis Management 3
This course provides an overview of planning and management principles applicable to business or operational resumption following an emergency. The emphasis will be on minimizing the impact of a disaster on business operations

463 Voluntary Agency Disaster Services 3
Examination of the roles played by local, state, national, and international voluntary agencies in emergency preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery

464 Disaster and Culture 3
Examines human-made and natural disasters through cross-cultural and historical perspectives. Addresses cultural variation across and within relevant communities including those of disaster victims, emergency management systems, and a broad public.

Sample Course Syllabi

Our curriculum is designed to be rigourous and challenging. We seek to utilize our face-to-face courses to educate undergraduate students in the literature and engage them in activities that build leadership, problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication skills. Most of our courses also require students to complete outside training as a course requirement (e.g., FEMA Independent Study Courses). Please keep in mind that these courses change significantly from year-to-year as instructors identify ways to improve the course. Feel free to view and/or download two sample syllabi:

Internships

NDSU's Emergency Management Program believes that internships are part of a well-rounded education. Internships are important in that they aid in the development of practical skills and abilities and help students develop working relationships with professionals in the field. Students participating in internship opportunities gain valuable experience and are more viable as job candidates upon graduation. The program strives to create internship opportunities that meet individual students' needs.

Examples of organizations with which Emergency Management students have completed internships include:

  • North Dakota Department of Emergency Services
  • Gate City Bank
  • Countless County Emergency Management Offices in Minnesota, North Dakota, and beyond
  • City of Fargo Emergency Management
  • Fargo Public Schools
  • West Fargo School District
  • The Federal Emergency Management Agency's Emergency Management Institute
  • CETERO Research
  • University of Minnesota
  • Lutheran Disaster Response
  • Fargo Marathon
  • Fargo Lions
  • Fargo YWCA
  • International Association of Emergency Managers--US Council
  • Florida Department of Emergency Management

For more information on setting up an internship, contact the Internship Coordinator, Carol Cwiak, via phone at (701) 231-5847 or via email at carol.cwiak@ndsu.edu.

Volunteer Opportunities

There are a variety of organizations that need volunteers to help with the disaster-related services they provide. Regardless of whether you have completed an internship, are a a major/minor in emergency management, or have already graduated, you can get involved in helping your local community respond to and recovery from hazard events! The Red Cross and Salvation Army are two examples of organizations with which you could volunteer.

The Red Cross:
The local chapter of the Red Cross, the Minn-kota Red Cross Chapter, needs your help. If you want to join their Disaster Action Team, you will need to take a couple of initial steps. First, go through the Online Orientation that will provide an overview of the work that volunteers do with the Red Cross. Second, view the Introduction to Disaster Services video that shows you some of the work disaster volunteers perform on site and behind the scenes. Once you have taken these initial steps you can visit the local Red Cross website to see available courses and training dates. You can sign up for these courses by contacting the chapter at 701-364-1800. Disaster courses are held at the Minn-Kota Chapter unless otherwise noted. Once complete, members of the team may be deployed to disasters locally and in the U.S. Whenever there is a disaster, you are given the choice as to whether you are available for deployment. Deployments typically last 2-4 weeks.

Salvation Army:
If you are interested in volunteering with the Salvation Army, you first need to complete a volunteer application. After completing a volunteer application, you will need to complete one or more training courses (depending on how involved you want to be in the delivery of disaster services and the role you want to play). The local chapter of the Salvation Army offers volunteer training regularly. Some training that you could take to prepare for volunteer work includes: Intro to Emergency Disaster Services, Food Service and Handling, International Deployment, Emotional and Spiritual Care, Incident Command System, Operations, Disaster Social Services, Public Information Officer, Medic First Aid, and more. Learn more about available courses and upcoming training dates.

Alumni Advice

This section contains advice from undergraduate program alumni for current and/or prospective undergraduate students.

Breanna Koval

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Team Member, Ready Campus Initiative, North Dakota State University
Wilkin County Emergency Management Director, Minnesota

Current Position:
Wilkin County Emergency Management Director, Minnesota

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“Looking beyond the basic fundamentals learned in the classroom, the program at NDSU taught me how to think critically and "outside of the box" to solve a problem.  When responding to an incident the solution to a problem is not always straight forward and being able to analyze and think critically is vital."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Network as much as you can not only with local and regional professionals but with fellow students.  This generation of students is the next generation of professionals.  Some of your peers are likely to be professionals you collaborate with in the near future!"

Kevin Helland

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Project Specialist, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services

Current Position:
Project Specialist, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“75% of my days are spent communicating and collaborating with others in my team, the state, FEMA, and the local jurisdiction."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way.  I'm in my current job because of my internship and taking advantage of the opportunities that were presented."

Tricia Kriel

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Ransom County North Dakota Emergency Manager since February 14th 2011

Current Position:
Ransom County Emergency Manager, North Dakota

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
"It’s hard to pick just one, a lot of different aspects of my degree are being applied, mitigation, planning/preparedness, and anything to do with grants."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Intern with an actual County/City Emergency Manager if they are considering that as a career. Take a grant writing class, accounting classes, and even a class about local government to understand County/City governments and where the Emergency Manager fits in the picture."

Jeanna Sommers

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Lincoln County Emergency Management Director, Minnesota

Current Position:
Lincoln County Emergency Management Director, Minnesota

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“Incident Command structure- very important and used throughout the field, when planning, responding, and recovering from an incident."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Take internships seriously, try to go beyond the norm and use them to gain as much experience as possible.  Build lasting relationships within the field it’s all about who you know these days and you never know when that could turn into a great job."

Blake Bennett

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Intern, Integrated Solutions Consulting, Fargo, ND
Assets Protection Technician, Target Corporation’s Corporate Command Center, Minneapolis, MN

Current Position:
Assets Protection Technician, Target Corporation’s Corporate Command Center, Minneapolis, MN

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
" The one thing that I learned that is being most applied today is that successful partnerships equal a coordinated response. Creating successful partnerships early will equal a successful response. An emergency manager should not just reach out to the local responders, but bring in those partners that are not so obvious. Reaching out to the private sector pre-disaster, and creating partnerships with industries like the retail sector, maximizes the emergency manager’s resources post-disaster."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"An emergency manger depends heavily on organizational and administrative duties. That means students need to know how to better use ALL Microsoft Office programs. Second, every student should do their best to make partnerships early within their careers. Students need to take advantage of networking events inside and outside of the career path. If students do not learn how to successfully network in emergency management, then they will not enjoy a successful career."

Sarah Land, MPA

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Intern, Office of Emergency Management, City of McKinney, Texas
CERT Coordinator, Office of Emergency Management, City of McKinney, Texas

Current Position:
Emergency Management Specialist, South Dakota Office of Emergency Management, Pierre, South Dakota

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“Emergency Management is a group effort.  Working together to produce some sort of project in class is real-world experience, especially if you have a difficult group-member.  That person will teach you a valuable lesson in patience, conflict management, and the realization that outside of school there will be other people exactly like them that you will also have to work with in your career."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Network, network, network!  This includes taking opportunities as they come, even if they aren't specifically what you intend to continue in, introducing yourself to key players in your emergency management community, and attending conferences (such as the annual IAEM conference).  It is all about the people you know and the relationships you build that make successful emergency managers.  You never know when that little bit of extra experience or connection will come in handy.

Take FEMA Independent Study courses.  They serve as valuable learning tools, as well as resume boosters.

Learn and understand ICS, NIMS, The Stafford Act, and other state-level and local legislation that are applicable in the area in which you want to work."

Jason Anderson

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Disaster Services Coordinator for Convoy of Hope

Current Position:
Disaster Services Coordinator for Convoy of Hope

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"I feel the sociological perspective that is added to the NDSU's emergency management program has been very beneficial. I have talked to different people in the Emergency Management field that have a bachelors degree in Emergency Management and as far as I know, we are the only university that has a sociological perspective added to our Emergency Management program. I think that is awesome!"

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Every agency that is involved in Emergency Management (which includes non-profit, consultant or government agency) is using the ICS model. Whatever it takes, whether through a simulation or lecture, students need to learn and practice the ICS model. I really did not expect to be using ICS when I came to Convoy of Hope but we are trying to implement it into our regular national and international operations. It is important that the students continue to study and practice ICS because if they do not, it can be easily forgotten.

Also, I would tell students it is important for them to take advantage of any opportunity to get field experience. It can be a tough field to get into. I personally believe education helps open doors but experience helps in getting you the job."

Danielle Dracy

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Planner, South Dakota Department of Public Safety - Office of Emergency Management

Current Position:
Planner, South Dakota Department of Public Safety - Office of Emergency Management

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being applied in Practice:
“There’s certainly more than one thing I learned from the NDSU program that I apply every day, but to sum it up, I’d say focus on the fundamentals. When things are moving so quickly during an emergency that you feel like you don’t know which way is up, focusing on the fundamentals of emergency management and ICS keep you moving down the right track. A solid understanding of the basic principles is absolutely necessary.”

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
“Practice working hard and having fun. I believe a strong work ethic and good sense of humor are habits that should be continually practiced. Emergency management can be a very stressful field at times, and a strong work ethic is critical; on the same note, being able to take light-things lightly is hugely important during stressful times.”

Robert Davidson

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
None.

Current Position:
Intelligence Officer, United States Air Force

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"A true appreciation for the multiple, complex forces at work within a given geo-political body that must be factored into any operation seeking overall betterment of that body."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Get into the habit of good time management and thorough fact finding; but, above all else, keep a patient and open mind."

Melanie Moen

Emergency Management Positions Held Since Graduation:
Hazard Mitigation Planner, Federal Emergency Management Agency
Planner, Ward County Emergency Management
Emergency Services Director, West Dakota American Red Cross

Current Position:
Emergency Services Director, West Dakota American Red Cross

One Thing Learned in the Degree Program that is being Applied in Practice:
"Having knowledge on how people act in a crisis, EOC's, mitigation and many other things I use daily towards working with volunteers in running any response from a singly family fire to something large scale. Jobs in this field can be high stress and time consuming, make sure you have a really good support network."

What Every Student Should Do to Prepare for a Career in Emergency Management:
"Get involved with various organizations such as Red Cross, CERT, etc. so you have something to put on your resume for experience."


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Last Updated: Monday, August 18, 2014 10:28:14 AM