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Melissa Vosen Callens, Online Instructor

Academic Adviser and Lecturer, University Studies, NDSU
Office:
Morrill 112A
Phone:
701-231-6314
Email:
Melissa.Vosen@ndsu.edu

Teaching
I teach two courses for the College of University Studies on a regular basis: University 189: Skills
for Academic Success and University 489: Capstone Experience. For the English Department, I typically teach upper-division writing courses (English 320, English 325, and English 357) and occasionally first-year composition. I also advise over 150 undeclared NDSU students a semester.

Research
I earned my BS in English education, my MA in English, and my Ph.D. in English at North Dakota State University. In other words, if you have a question about NDSU, ask me! In my dissertation, I examined how our field approaches collaboration from several different standpoints: our scholarship, our classrooms, and in our textbooks. Interestingly, I discovered that the discourses surrounding collaboration are very different—more than mere genre variations. Ultimately, I propose a new way of viewing collaboration: a collaboration matrix. My matrix combines Rebecca Moore Howard’s definition of collaborative writing and Andrea Lunsford and Lisa Ede’s definitions of hierarchical and dialogic collaboration. I believe these definitions complement one another, rather than compete.

Recently, I've been focusing my research on popular culture. I contributed to a collection that is set to be published early next year: 100 People Who Changed American Entertainment. In one of my chapters, I chronicle the life of the Smothers brothers, ultimately arguing that it is hard to say what television, in many respects, would look like without them. Despite the short run of their show, the brothers advanced the discussion on censorship, questioning the role of not only the FCC, but also network executives.

In addition, I am currently writing an article that examines Mike Judge’s hit cartoon, King of the Hill. In “That Boy IS Right: The Many Discourses of Hank Hill,” I examine how the main character, Hank, awkwardly, yet often successfully, navigates multiple discourses, all in the attempt to build a relationship with his preteen son, Bobby.

Last updated: August 15, 2012. 

Photograph of Melissa Vosen

Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

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Published by the NDSU Dept. of English

Last Updated: Friday, September 12, 2014 7:25:13 PM