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Graduate School

 


Criminal Justice

Interim Department Head

Dr. Gary Totten

Department Location

Criminal Justice & Public Policy

Telephone Number

(701) 231-8567

Degrees Offered

Ph.D., M.S.

Application Deadline

April 1 for PhD applicants, Master's applications accepted for fall and spring enrollments on a rolling basis

Test Requirements

GRE

English Proficiency Requirements

TOEFL ibT 100
IELTS 7

To qualify for assistantship
TOEFL ibT 114
IELTS 8

Program Description


The Department of Criminal Justice offers graduate study leading to both a MS and a Ph.D. degree in Criminal Justice. The MS degree has two tracks; Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology. The program in Criminal Justice is designed to enhance student's skills in understanding, gathering, processing, and analyzing research in the areas of criminology and criminal justice. The topical curriculum is geared to understanding, critiquing, and analyzing the criminal justice system with an orientation toward urban issues as they impact crime and criminal justice. The curriculum consists of foundation courses in theory, policy, and research methods, plus three substantive areas: 1) criminology, 2) policing, and 3) corrections. Students have their choice of specializing in one of the three. Elective course work can include classes such as Violence, Gender and Justice, and crime commodities. Students also will be afforded course work in learning how to teach a college course.

Graduates will find an expanding and terrific academic job market available as well as professional employment in the criminal justice policy and research sector. There are currently less than 40 Criminal Justice Ph.D. programs operating on a national level, so students graduating with a Criminal Justice Ph.D. will be competitive for the 350 positions available annually in academic units.

Ph.D. in Criminal Justice

Admission Requirements


Students should enter the program with either a baccalaureate degree or with an approved master's degree. Students will be required to have had one course in research methods; and one course in statistics. Plus, students should have adequate background preparation or demonstrated potential in the field of Criminology or Criminal Justice.

Students will be required to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and submit their undergraduate and/or graduate transcripts. For admission to full standing, students are required to attain a combined minimum score on the GRE of 1,000 (verbal and quantitative) and achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.0 over their last 60 credit hours. Students not meeting these standards will be evaluated and possibly admitted on conditional status.

A student entering the program with a master's degree would take a minimum of 60 credit hours. Students entering the program with a master's degree should submit their research thesis to the graduate committee for review. This committee would be charged with determining whether the research project is sufficient in scope and depth to warrant further supervised research.

Degree Requirements


The curricular structure of the program is listed below for students entering the program with a master's degree that is not related to criminal justice/criminology:

*Foundation Courses
Students are required to complete 9 credits in foundation courses.

CJ 703 Advanced Criminology
CJ 709 Criminal Justice Policy
Hum 702 Introduction to College Teaching

*Methodological Skills
Students are required to complete 15 credits in methodological skills courses. Nine (9) of these credits must be completed at NDSU.

CJ 734 Advanced Criminal Justice Methods
STAT 725 Applied Statistics
STAt 726 Applied Regression and Analysis of Variance
Note: Stat 725 is a prerequisite for this course
CJ 702 Program Evaluation
C 759 Advanced Research Design

Substantive Areas
Students are required to complete a total of 18 credits in the substantive areas. Students must complete four courses in a substantive area of choice (12 credits). Additionally, students must complete one course in each of their non-substantive areas (6 credits).

Criminology
CJ 606 Delinquency
CJ 721 Individual Theories of Crime
CJ 722 Structural Theories of Crime
CJ 750 Violence
CJ 752 Criminogenic Commodities

Corrections
CJ 661 Corrections
CJ 707 Juvenile Corrections
CJ 762 Community Corrections
CJ 763 Correctional Rehabilitation
CJ 765 Crime Prevention

Policing
CJ 660 Criminalization
CJ 755 Administrative Policing
CJ 757 Community Policing
CJ 760 Police and Race Issues
CJ 761 Police Effectiveness

Electives
Students are also required to complete 15 credits of elective courses. Students should consult with their advisor as to appropriate electives.

Dissertation 1-15 credits

Total Credits 90

Students admitted to the doctoral program who have earned a master’s degree in criminal justice/criminology will be given credit for their master’s degree (up to 30 credits). The amount of credit for the master’s degree will be determined by the graduate coordinator. The curricular structure of the program is listed below for students entering the program with a master's degree in criminal justice/criminology:

Theory/Policy Courses
CJ 703 Advanced Criminology
CJ 709 Criminal Justice Policy
Hum 702 Introduction to College Teaching

9 credits

Research Skills
CJ 734 Advanced Criminal Justice Methods
Stat 725 Applied Statistics
State 726 Applied Regression and Analysis of Variance
Note: Stat 725 is a prerequisite for this course
CJ 702 Program Evaluation

12 credits

Electives
CJ 607 Deviant Behavior
CJ 768 Gender and Justice
SOC 700 Qualitative Methods
CDFS 650 Adolescent Development
PSY 640 Experimental Methods
PSY 670 Experimental Social Psychology
STAT 660 Applied Survey Sampling
STAT 665 Meta-Analysis Methods

6 credits

Substantive Areas
Students must complete four courses in substantive area of choice (12 credits)
plus complete one course (6 credits) in each of their non-substantive areas.

Criminology
CJ 606 Delinquency
CJ 750 Violence
CJ 752 Criminogenic Commodities
CJ 721 Individual Theories of Crime
CJ 722 Structural Theories of Crime

Corrections
CJ 661 Corrections
CJ 765 Crime Prevention
CJ 762 Community Corrections
CJ 707 Juvenile Corrections
CJ 763 Correctional Rehabilitation

Policing
CJ 660 Criminalization
CJ 755 Administrative Policing
CJ 757 Community Policing
CJ 760 Police and Race Issues
CJ 761 Police Effectiveness

18 credits

Dissertation

1-15 credits

Total Credits

60

MS Degree in Criminal Justice

Admission Requirements


Students will need to enter the program with a baccalaureate degree. Students will be required to have had one course in research methods, one course in statistics, and should document adequate background preparation or demonstrated potential in the field of Criminology or Criminal Justice. For admission to full-standing, students are required to achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.0 over their last 60 credit hours.

Degree Requirements


Students will need to declare their choice of a Track by the end of their first semester in the program. Both Tracks require the completion of the following 5 Foundation Courses (15 Credits total)

  • Advanced Criminology
  • Criminal Justice Policy
  • Program Evaluation
  • Applied Statistics
  • Advanced Criminal Justice Methods
  • Advacned Research Design

Applied Track-complete 1 course from each of the
following 2 areas (6 credits total).

Corrections

  • Corrections
  • Community Corrections
  • Crime Prevention
  • Correctional Rehabilitation
  • Juvenile Corrections

Policing

  • Police and Society                                                           
  • Administrative Policing                                  
  • Community Policing                                                        
  • Police Effectiveness                                       
  • Police and Race Issues  

Criminology Track-complete 1 course from the Theory area
(3 credits total) and 2 courses from the Elective Area (6 credits total).

Theory

  • Individual Theories of Crime
  • Structural Theories of Crime

Electives

  • Violence
  • Criminogenic Commodities
  • Advanced Psychopathology

Click here for course descriptions.

Criminal Justice Faculty


Carol Archbold, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska-Omaha, 2002
Research Interests: Police Studies, Race and the Criminal Justice System, Alternative Dispute Resolution and the Criminal Justice System, Qualitative Research Methods 

Sarah E. Browning, Ph.D.
University of Toronto, 2007
Research Interests: Substance Use and Abuse, Violence, Quantitative Methods, Criminological Theory 

Thomas D. McDonald, Ph.D.
Southern Illinois University, 1972
Research Interests: Criminal Justice, Deviant Behavior, Social Disorganization, Evaluation Research 

Amy J. Stichman, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati, 2003
Research Interests: Corrections, Institutional Life, Inmate and Correctional Officer Attitude, Treatment Program Evaluation 

Kevin M. Thompson, Ph.D.
University of Arizona, 1986
Research Interests: Delinquency, Quantitative Methods, Alcohol and Drugs, Juvenile Drug Courts 

Political Science Faculty


Nicholas Bauroth, Ph.D.
Loyola University, 2003
Research Interests: State and Local Politics, Politics of Crime 

Affiliated Faculty

 

Wendy Troop-Gordon, Ph.D.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002
Research Interests: Violence and Aggression, Adolescent Development, Victimization, Quantitative Methods 

Joel Hektner, Ph.D.
University of Chicago, 1996
Research Interests: Aggression, Research Methods, Peer Influence on Delinquency

 


Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

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NDSU Graduate School
Phone: +1 (701) 231-7033
Campus address:  106 Putnam Hall
Physical/delivery address:  NDSU Graduate School/106 Putnam Hall/1349 12th Avenue Northwest/Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address:  NDSU Dept. 2820/PO Box 6050/Fargo, ND 58108
Page manager: NDSU Graduate School

Last Updated: Friday, February 07, 2014 12:48:59 PM