Content | Navigation |

Graduate School

 


Emergency Management

Department Head

Dr. Daniel Klenow

Department Location

107 Reinke Visual Arts Gallery

Telephone Number

(701) 231-5595

Degrees Offered

Ph.D., M.S.

Application Deadline

February 15 for fall semester

Test Requirements

GRE

English Proficiency Requirements

TOEFL ibT 100
IELTS 7

Program Description 


The mission of NDSU's Emergency Management Program is to create a cadre of graduates with extensive theoretical and applied knowledge in emergency management who can advance the field and discipline of emergency management. The program is built on a core of emergency management and methods/theory courses to help students approach the study of disasters and emergency management from the emergency management disciplinary perspective. Additionally, the program draws from other disciplines that enhance the development of processes and techniques to deal with emergencies and disasters. 

The master's and doctoral degree programs in emergency management at NDSU are campus-based. Potential students are encouraged to visit the campus and meet faculty and current graduate students.

Admission Requirements 


Students can be admitted to our graduate program with either a baccalaureate degree (for admission to the master's program) or with an approved master's degree (for admission to the doctoral program). For admission in full standing to the master's program, students will be required to have a GPA of 3.2 or higher in their undergraduate *major and a 3.0 overall.* *The GRE is required for all applicants .* Applicants must submit their undergraduate and/or graduate transcripts. Students should have adequate background preparation or demonstrated potential in the field of emergency management.

For admission to the doctoral program in full standing, students must satisfy the admission requirements for the master's degree and have a masters degree in emergency management or a related field. Students entering the program with a master's degree will be required to complete a minimum of 60 credits.

The application process for Master's or Doctoral level studies is as follows:

  • Complete the application form on the Graduate School webpage and submit the required materials. The deadline for submitting application materials is February 15th for the upcoming academic year.
  • Request letters of reference in support of your application. Letters from faculty who have had you in undergraduate or graduate classes are preferred. 
  • All master’s and doctoral applicants must submit GRE scores. Specific GRE discipline tests are not required. GRE scores are required for admission to the Emergency Management program because they provide another perspective on a student's academic abilities. At this time, no specific score totals are used as a cutoff. Applications are evaluated holistically using all indicators of student aptitude for successful graduate study in this program.
  • Submit electronic copies of two academic papers that you have written to: Daniel J. Klenow, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Management (daniel.klenow@ndsu.edu). The papers do not have to focus on emergency management or disasters, but must be research papers written in English. Writing samples are used to gain information on the student's writing style and ability to write research-based papers. Papers submitted in support of an application would ideally be eight or more pages in length. In addition, to meet the objective of the admission criteria the paper must be a research paper that employs formal citations. Papers will most typically be library-based research papers but papers based on original data gathering are also encouraged. The latter might be more likely to come from an applicant with a master's degree.
  • Master’s and doctoral applicants meeting the aforementioned criteria for admission will participate in a conference call interview with two or more of the program faculty. Applicant interviews are designed to provide two-way communication between the faculty and prospective applicant. The faculty will ask questions but we also want the applicant to pose questions about the program and our educational objectives. The interview should assist the student and faculty to test the goodness of fit between the program and the applicant. Interviews will assess the applicant's ability to engage in evidence-based reasoning.
  • We are most likely to accept doctoral applicants who demonstrate knowledge of the concepts discussed in the books on our Master's Reading List in their interview.
  • The emergency management program at NDSU believes that the best doctoral degree program in emergency management will be made up of a diverse student body. We welcome applicants to our doctoral degree program with Master's degrees from a variety of disciplines; students from all countries; students with different professional backgrounds; and, students with varying goals and interests. We want to ensure however that students entering our program are knowledgeable about emergency management and some of the literature that provides the foundation for our discipline. Therefore, when applicants are interviewed during the application process, we expect that the best candidates will demonstrate their familiarity with the major concepts presented in the books on the reading list.
  • By asking our potential doctoral students to enter our program with foundational knowledge of the emergency management literature we hope to accomplish several goals. First, in reading the books on the reading list, prospective students will be able to confirm their desire to pursue a doctoral education in the discipline of emergency management. Second, we assume that students who undertake this reading in preparation for their application interview will be bright and motivated students who are passionate about the study of emergency management--exactly the type of students we want to be a part of our doctoral student cohort. Third, and finally, a basic understanding of the emergency management literature will help students coming into our program from a variety of backgrounds succeed once they begin their studies at NDSU. 

Financial Assistance

 
Both teaching and research assistantships are available contingent on departmental and faculty research funds. All students are automatically considered for graduate assistantships, unless they request otherwise, so no separate application process is required for such consideration. Awards are based on past academic and professional performance. The review process is highly competitive.

Master of Science Degree 


The comprehensive and challenging Master's degree programs in Emergency Management are intended to explore the academic research literature related to emergency management as well as provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge through research and/or practicum. The program is built on a core of emergency management courses to help students learn how human beings create, interact, and cope with hazards, vulnerability, and associated events. The program emphasizes the study of how human beings cope with hazard events through activities related to preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.

The Department of Emergency Management offers two tracks in its master's degree program. The first option-the thesis track-is a research-focused degree track that entails a combination of emergency management coursework and research methods. This option is ideal for graduate students who intend to pursue a doctoral degree in Emergency Management or a related discipline and for those students who want to complete a traditional master's degree. The second option-the comprehensive study option-is a more practice-based track with coursework in emergency management and a significant practicum requirement. 

Requirements for Emergency Management Master's Thesis Track 

Core: Complete all courses (9 credits)
SOC 700: Qualitative Methods
SOC 701: Quantitative Methods
EMGT 720: Emergency Management Theory 

Disaster Phases: Complete all courses (12 credits).
EMGT 761: Preparedness Theory and Practice
EMGT 762: Mitigation Theory and Practice
EMGT 763: Response Theory and Practice
EMGT 764: Recovery Theory and Practice 

Electives: Select 3 courses from the following list (9 credits).
EMGT 620: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment
EMGT 610: Emergency Management Planning
EMGT 614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management
SOC 643: International Disasters
SOC 645: Special Populations and Disasters
EMGT 681: Disaster Analysis
EMGT 661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 663: Voluntary Agency Disaster Services
ANTH 664: Disaster and Culture
EMGT 696: Special Topics
ENGL 758: Topics in Rhetoric and Writing
EMGT 730: Advanced Research Methods 

Practicum: (3 credits)
EMGT 795: Emergency Management Applied or Research Practicum 

Thesis (minimum 6 - maximum 10 credits, only 6 count toward degree)

EMGT 798: Thesis Paper 

TOTAL = 39 credits

Notes: Students must complete a statistics course as a prerequisite for Quantitative Methods. Students must have completed an undergraduate research methods course prior to enrolling in Quantitative and Qualitative Methods.

Those students lacking in field experience will be expected to complete an applied, field-based emergency management practicum; however, students with ample field experience in emergency management will be expected to complete a research practicum to fulfill the practicum credits. The research practicum can be fulfilled by participating in a member of the faculty's research or by the student conducting his/her own research under the supervision of a faculty member. The student and his /her advisor will determine the type of practicum a student ought to take.

Requirements for Emergency Management Master's Comprehensive Study Track

Core: Complete all courses (15 credits).
EMGT 720: Emergency Management Theory
EMGT 761: Preparedness Theory and Practice
EMGT 762: Mitigation Theory and Practice
EMGT 763: Response Theory and Practice
EMGT 764: Recovery Theory and Practice 

Electives: Select 6 courses from the following list (18 credits). 

Group A: Emergency Management Elective Courses (12 credits)
EMGT 620: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment
EMGT 610: Comprehensive Emergency Management Planning
SOC 643: International Disasters
SOC 645: Special Populations and Disasters
EMGT 681: Disaster Analysis
EMGT 661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 663: Voluntary Agency Disaster Services
ANTH 664: Disaster and Culture
EMGT 696: Special Topics 

Group B: Critical Thinking and Analysis Elective Courses (6 credits)
ENGL 758: Topics in Rhetoric and Writing
STAT 725: Applied Statistics
SOC 700: Qualitative Methods
SOC 701: Quantitative Methods
EMGT 730: Advanced Research Methods
EMGT 614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management 

Practicum: (6 credits)
EMGT 795: Emergency Management Applied or Research Practicum 

Comprehensive Study Paper: (3 credits)
EMGT 797: Comprehensive Study Option 

TOTAL = 42 credits 

Notes: Students must complete a statistics course as a prerequisite for Quantitative Methods. Students must have completed an undergraduate research methods course prior to enrolling in Quantitative and Qualitative Methods.

Those students lacking in field experience will be expected to complete an applied, field-based emergency management practicum; however, students with ample field experience in emergency management will be expected to complete a research practicum to fulfill the practicum credits. The research practicum can be fulfilled by participating in a member of the faculty's research or by the student conducting his/her own research under the supervision of a faculty member. The student and his /her advisor will determine the type of practicum a student ought to take. 

Doctoral Degree


North Dakota State University offers a Doctor of Philosophy in Emergency Management designed to prepare graduates for careers teaching future generations of emergency management students in higher education programs, conducting research that describes and explains patterns, processes, change, and effectiveness/efficiency related to emergency management, and/or policy development and analysis related to emergency management. 

The degree program is built on a core of emergency management courses to help students learn how human beings create, interact, and cope with hazards, vulnerability, and associated events. The program emphasizes the study of how human beings cope with hazard events through activities related to preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Additionally, the degree program requires students to choose two areas of concentration built on courses from disciplines outside of emergency management to complement their emergency management educational foundation. 

This comprehensive and challenging program is committed both to extensive research and its practical application in the areas of emergency management. Throughout the graduate career, students will have the opportunity to conduct research and work in the field. 

The Ph.D. is awarded in recognition of significant depth of understanding and scholarly achievement in emergency management. The recipient must complete all of the required course work, pass three written comprehensive exams (one on emergency management theory, one that applies the student's areas of concentration to emergency management, and one on research methods), complete a novel and significant research project for the dissertation; and successfully defend this research in an oral examination. The student's progress will be reviewed by a supervisory committee that is responsible for reviewing the student's plan of study, written comprehensive examinations, dissertation proposal, and dissertation defense. 

Requirements for a Doctorate in Emergency Management

Core: Complete all courses (33 credits)

Group A: Theory and Methods (21 credits)
EMGT 720: Emergency Management Theory
ENGL 758: Topics in Rhetoric and Writing
SOC 700: Qualitative Methods
SOC 701: Quantitative Methods
EMGT 730: Advanced Research Methods
STAT 725: Applied Statistics
EMGT 614: Spatial Analysis in Emergency Management 

Group B: Emergency Management Phase Courses (12 credits)
EMGT 761: Preparedness Theory and Practice
EMGT 762: Mitigation Theory and Practice
EMGT 763: Response Theory and Practice
EMGT 764: Recovery Theory and Practice 

Emergency Management Electives (36 credits). Students will complete 12-15 credits in Group A, 18-24 credits in Group B, and up to 6 credits in Group C.

Group A: Emergency Management Elective Courses (12-15 credits).
EMGT 620: Hazard, Risk, and Vulnerability Assessment
EMGT 610: Emergency Management Planning
SOC 643: International Disasters
SOC 645: Special Populations and Disasters
EMGT 681: Disaster Analysis
EMGT 661: Business Continuity and Crisis Management
EMGT 663: Voluntary Agency Disaster Services
EMGT 696: Special Topics 

Group B: Areas of Concentration (18 credits).

Business, Logistics and Security Management
· BUSN 630: Legal and Social Environment of Business-A
· CED 753: Not-for-profit Management-EO
· HDE 777: Advanced Stress Management (online)-EO
· MIS 770: Information Resources Management-A
· TL711: Logistics Systems-A
· TL719: Crisis Analysis and Homeland Security-A
· TL721: International Logistics Management-A
· EMGT 661: Business Continuity & Crisis Management (if not taken in Group A)-A

Communication
· COMM 725:725 Communication and Change-A
· COMM 783: Advanced Organizational Communication I-EO
· COMM 784: Advanced Organizational Communication II-EO
· COMM 785: Advanced Crisis Communication-A
· COMM 786: Risk Communication-EO

Community Development and Change
· CED 711: Community Development I: Principles & Strategies of Community Change (online)-A
· CED 713: Community Development II: Organizing for Community Change (online)-A
· CED 717: Community and Regional Economic Policy and Analysis (online)-A
· COMM 725: Communication and Change-A
· TL727: Organizational Change Management-A
· SOC 639: Social Change-EO

Environmental
· ECON 681: Natural Resource Economics-A
· ECS 770: Environmental Policy and Law-EO
· HIST 634: History and Politics of Environmental Science-A
· NRM 631: National Environmental Protection Act and Environmental Impact Assessments-A
· NRM 632: Environmental Impact Assessments-A
· NRM 702: Natural Resources Management Planning-A
· NRM 720: Natural Resources Administration and Policy-A
· SOC 631: Environmental Sociology-EO

Geology
· GEOL 612: Geomorphology
· GEOL 614: Hydrogeology
· GEOL 620: Mineralogy
· GEOL 657: Structural Geology
· GEOL 628: Geochemistry

International
· ANTH 664: Disaster and Culture -EO
· ECON 672: International Trade-A
· POLS 650: Politics of Developing Countries-A
· POLS 642: Global Policy Issues-EO
· TL721: International Logistics Management-A
· EMGT/SOC 643: International Disasters (if not taken in Group A)-EO

Social and Cultural· ANTH 650: Cultural Anthropology-A
· ANTH 662: Cultural Ecology-A
· ANTH 664: Disaster and Culture-EO
· SOC 610: Social Inequality-EO
· SOC 631: Environmental Sociology-EO
· SOC 639: Social Change-EO

Organizations
· BUSN 657: Leadership in Organizations-A
· BUSN 750: Advanced Organizational Behavior-A
· COMM 783: Advanced Organizational Communication I-EO
· COMM 784: Advanced Organizational Communication II-EO
· PSYCH 653: Organizational Psychology-EO
· TL727: Organizational Change Management-A

Public Health
· PHRM 710: Health Care Delivery in the U.S.
· PHRM 705: Public Health as a Team Endeavor
· MICR 650: Infectious Disease Pathogenesis
· MICR 670: Basic Immunology
· MGMT 753: Leading and Managing Public Health Systems
· MICR 674/SAFE 674: Epidemiology Environmental Health
· EMGT 715: Emergency Management for Public Health Professionals
· SAFE 604 Epidemiology of Foodborne Illness 

Group C: Other electives (6 credits) 

Practicum (6 credits)
EMGT 794: Emergency Management Applied or Research Practicum

Dissertation (15 credits) 

TOTAL = 90 credits

Notes: Students must have taken a statistics course prior to enrolling in Quantitative Methods and must have taken an undergraduate or graduate research methods course prior to enrolling in both Quantitative and Qualitative Methods.

Courses taken at the undergraduate level (400) cannot be retaken at the graduate level (600).

Pick a minimum of 1 area of concentration and complete a minimum of 9 credits within that area. Students may mix and match the rest of their electives in this section as desired. Note: To earn a second area of concentration a student must complete 9 credits within the additional area.

A indicates a course that is offered annually; and, EO indicates a course that is offered every other year.

Students will complete 3 comprehensive exams as part of the doctoral degree program. One exam will be to assess student knowledge of emergency management theory; one exam will be to assess student knowledge of methodology; and, one exam will be to assess student ability to apply what they learned in their area(s) of concentration to the discipline of emergency management.

Note: Courses in this section of electives are for prior thesis, comprehensive study, or technical papers completed as part of a master's degree program, didactic courses, seminars, independent study, and/or field research. Students may also take an additional 6 credits from Group B above.

Those students lacking in field experience will be expected to complete an applied, field-based emergency management practicum; however, students with ample field experience in emergency management will be expected to complete a research practicum to fulfill the practicum credits. The research practicum can be fulfilled by participating in a member of the faculty's research or by the student conducting his/her own research under the supervision of a faculty member. The student and his /her advisor will determine the type of practicum a student ought to take.

Click here for course descriptions.

Faculty

Carol Cwiak, J.D., Ph.D. 
Western State University, 1995
North Dakota State University, 2009 
Research Interests: Preparedness and Mitigation, Business Continuity, Law and Emergency Management 

Jessica Jensen, Ph.D.
North Dakota State University, 2010
Research Interests: Development of Emergency Management Discipline,
Bureaucratization in Emergency Management 

Daniel J. Klenow, Ph.D.
University of Notre Dame, 1977
Research Interests: Special Populations, International Disasters, Emergency Management
Theory and Methodology 

Dong Keun (D.K.) Yoon, Ph.D.
Cornell University, 2007
Research Interests: Planning, Emergency Management, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 

George A. Youngs, Ph.D.
University of Iowa, 1981
Research Interests: Social Psychology, Research Methods, Sociology of Disasters, Emergency Management


Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

Follow NDSU
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • RSS
  • Google Maps

NDSU Graduate School
Phone: +1 (701) 231-7033
Campus address:  106 Putnam Hall
Physical/delivery address:  NDSU Graduate School/106 Putnam Hall/1349 12th Avenue Northwest/Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address:  NDSU Dept. 2820/PO Box 6050/Fargo, ND 58108
Page manager: NDSU Graduate School

Last Updated: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 8:14:48 PM