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2014 HDFS Gertrude Hinsz Lecture Series

Richard Lerner, Tufts University

"Promoting Positive Youth Development: Implications of the 4-H Study for Theory, Research, and Application."

 


 

Date: October 3, 2014

Location: MU Century Theater

Time: 3:30 PM
  Reception to follow MU Hidatsa

 

The recording of the recent Gertrude Weigum Hinsz Lecture can be viewed at:https://tegr.it/y/1h15w

 

Abstract for the talk:

The positive youth development (PYD) perspective is a strength-based model of development that seeks to understand and enhance the lives of diverse adolescents. Findings derived from the 4-H Study of PYD, as well as from other longitudinal studies conducted within the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, will be used to illustrate that, when the strengths of young people are aligned with the resources existing in families, schools, and communities that are potentially useful in actualizing these strengths, then healthy development will occur. Accordingly, the support that exists for the PTD perspective illustrates that scholars may be optimist about the potential for promoting thriving among youth, and suggests that the skills sets of researchers may be used in collaboration with community resources to answer questions about what actions, with what youth, at what points in their developmental trajectories, may be taken in what contextual settings, to foster what specific facets of well-being and health among youth.

Biographical Information for Richard M. Lerner

Richard M. Lerner is the Bergstrom Chair in Applied Developmental Science and the Director of the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University.  He went from kindergarten through Ph.D. within the New York City public schools, completing his doctorate at the City University of New York in 1971 in developmental psychology.  Lerner has more than 650 scholarly publications, including more than 75 authored or edited books.   He was the founding editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence and of Applied Developmental Science, which he continues to edit.  He was a 1980-81 fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science.  He is the 2013 recipient of the American Psychological Associations (Division 7) Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society.

Prior to joining Tufts University, he was on the faculty at The Pennsylvania State University, Michigan State University, and Boston College, where he was the Anita L. Brennan Professor of Education and the Director of the Center for Child, Family, and Community Partnerships.  During the 1994-95 academic year, Lerner held the visiting, Tyner Eminent Scholar Chair in the Human Sciences at Florida State University.   

Lerner is known for his theory of relations between life-span human development and social change, and for his research about the relations between adolescents and their peers, families, schools, and communities.  As illustrated by his 2004 book, Liberty:  Thriving and Civic Engagement among America‚Äôs Youth, and his 2007 book, The Good Teen:  Rescuing Adolescence from the Myth of the Storm and Stress Years, his work integrates the study of public policies and community-based programs with the promotion of positive youth development and youth contributions to civil society.  

He is married to Dr. Jacqueline V. Lerner, Professor in the Department of Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College.  They live in Wayland, Massachusetts.  They have three children, Justin, 33, a director and screen writer living in Los Angeles, Blair, 31, an advertising executive at Media Contacts in Boston, and Jarrett, 27, a novelist and editor living in Boston. They have one grandchild, Harper Rose Ramsey, who is 14 months old.



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Last Updated: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 8:11:26 AM