Press Room

Research News Releases—2008
 

NDSU Research Ranks in Top 50 Nationally: Reports More than $115 Million in Research | 12/19/2008

December 19, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—North Dakota State University today reported an estimated $115.5 million in total research and development activities for fiscal year 2008, an increase of $9.3 million over fiscal year 2007. Research in agricultural sciences, physical sciences, and engineering contributed to the growth. In addition, NDSU is listed among the top 50 research universities in the country in one category. The National Science Foundation ranks NDSU 41st nationally, when compared with research and development expenditures among 537 research universities without a medical school. The ranking is based NDSU's research expenditures of $106.2 million for fiscal year 2007, the latest year for which national statistics are available for comparison.

In addition, in several National Science Foundation (NSF) research subcategories for fiscal year 2007, NDSU ranks in the top 100 in several areas, including agricultural sciences, social sciences, physical sciences and chemistry. When total research expenditures across all institutions are compared, NDSU ranks 128 th out of 640 institutions included in the NSF report. The report on research and development expenditures offers a snapshot of how NDSU compares among research universities and colleges included in the report, which covers institutions from the U.S., Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

"The national comparison clearly shows that NDSU is a leader in several research categories. Our faculty, staff and students continue to excel in areas of innovative and technology driven research," said NDSU President Joseph A. Chapman.

Among various research categories, NDSU ranks as follows:

  • In the field of agricultural sciences, NDSU ranks 28th in total research expenditures among universities and colleges for FY 2007.
  • When ranked by research expenditures in social sciences, NDSU ranked 42nd by NSF among research universities in FY 2007.
  • In the field of physical sciences, NDSU ranked 74th in total research expenditures at colleges and universities in FY 2007. In the rankings, the category of physical sciences includes astronomy, chemistry, physics, materials sciences and other sciences not elsewhere classified.
  • In the field of chemistry, NDSU ranked 94th in total research expenditures among the top 100 universities and colleges in this category for fiscal year 2007.
Boudjouk Receives Discovery Award | 10/14/2008

October 14, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU, has received the Discovery Award from the Red River Valley Research Corridor during a presentation at the group's Milestones & Horizons Conference in Fargo on Oct. 13. Entrepreneur and philanthropist Doug Burgum, Fargo, received the Pathfinder Award at the event.

In the first such awards presented by the Research Corridor, Boudjouk received the honor from U. S. Senator Byron Dorgan who founded the Corridor to encourage technology development in the state. Delore Zimmerman, executive director of the Research Corridor, said the award was presented to Boudjouk for "Outstanding leadership and service in building and raising the visibility of the region’s research enterprise and groundbreaking scientific or applied research that has a regional, national or global impact." Zimmerman noted that Boudjouk has been instrumental in helping to build research infrastructure in North Dakota, and became involved in the Research Corridor at its inception in 2002.

NDSU President Joseph Chapman, speaking at the event, noted that "The Corridor has put North Dakota into the global marketplace, and that benefits our students in countless ways. A global perspective gives NDSU students a better chance for success, and international collaborations open the door for business and research partnerships."

The Red River Valley Research Corridor also presented the Pathfinder Award to Doug Burgum, whose leadership of Great Plains Software in Fargo resulted in international presence and a $1.1 billion acquisition by Microsoft Corporation. The Pathfinder Award recognizes "Exceptional achievement in developing and deploying technologies, products, processes or services in the marketplace that have a significant effect on the way business and society operate." Burgum is founder of The Kilbourne Group whose mission is to save and restore historic buildings in downtown Fargo through green initiatives. Burgum donated the NDSU Downtown building, which houses the visual arts, architecture, and landscape architecture programs, to the NDSU Development Foundation in 1991.

The Milestones & Horizons conference featured the achievements of the state's research universities and technology companies, as well as presentations from renowned scientists and inventors. Approximately 400 people, including NDSU students, attended the event to hear from Dean Kamen, who has been referred to as the modern-day Thomas Edison; Craig Mundie, who has been called Microsoft Corporation's top visionary; and Dr. Craig Venter, one of two scientists responsible for the Human Genome Project. Representatives from the Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory also provided information on energy technology at the conference.

National Science Foundation Awards $15 Million to North Dakota EPSCoR Program | 9/18/2008

September 18, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a five year grant award totaling $15 million to the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR).

The grant covers a variety of research programs at universities across the state.

The NSF grant will fund diverse research programs, with special emphasis in the areas of research in sustainable energy and flexible electronics and materials. Significant research will occur in these areas in a collaborative effort among the state's research universities. In flexible electronics and materials known as the FlexEm program, scientists will research ways to enhance the technology of placing electronic circuits on flexible materials like plastic, paper and fabric and develop third-generation solar energy materials. Research funds will also be devoted to SUNRISE, the Sustainable Energy Research Infrastructure and Support Education program to develop and improve sustainable energy options.

The principal investigator and author of the NSF grant which provides funding through 2013 is Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at North Dakota State University. Co-investigators on the grant include David Givers, co-project director of the North Dakota EPSCoR program at NDSU and Gary Johnson, EPSCoR co-project director and interim vice president of research at the University of North Dakota.

In addition to funding for flexible electronics and sustainable energy, the NSF five year grant will provide research funding for the following:

Grants for Faculty/Student Researchers

  • New faculty startups with grant awards for approximately 75 new faculty members to develop research programs.
  • Seed grants and awards to faculty members for new research programs and to groups of investigators to explore joint, multidisciplinary research projects that could lead to clusters or focal groups capable of obtaining independent funding. The emphasis will be on interdepartmental, interuniversity, interinstitutional (e.g., federal labs), private sector, and international collaborations.
  • Funding for graduate and undergraduate research assistantships

Grants for Cyberinfrastructure to Support Research

  • The award will provide desktop connectivity for up to 960 faculty, research staff and students at North Dakota State University in 20 research buildings.
  • The award provides funding to install a CAVE for visualization studies at the University of North Dakota. A Cave Automatic Virtual Environment is an immersive virtual reality environment where projectors are directed to three, four, five or six of the walls of a room.

Grants to Broaden Research Participation

  • The award will fund Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), a new ND EPSCoR initiative. It will provide supplemental funding on a competitive basis to women faculty for upgraded lab equipment, additional graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.
  • The award will fund the Nurturing American Tribal Undergraduate Research and Education (NATURE) program. It provides an education pathway for American Indian high school and tribal college students to study science, technology, engineering and math. This collaborative model engages North Dakota university professors with teachers and faculty from reservation high schools and tribal colleges. The program provides Native American students with educational summer camps, Sunday academies, and mentored research.

Grants to Fund Partnerships

  • The award will fund a Product Design Center (PDC). PDC bridges the gap between basic discoveries and commercialization, allowing researchers to enhance commercial potential of a discovery and protect intellectual property.
  • The award will fund The Plus Experience, a program designed to fill training gaps identified by regional industrial partners.
FACT SHEET: NDSU Announces Major Research Agreements with Federal Laboratories | 8/19/2008

Summary:
August 19, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—North Dakota State University today announced it has signed research agreements to conduct collaborative projects with two federal scientific laboratories. Under the agreements, NDSU will conduct separate research projects involving solar cells, polymers, and radio frequency identification.

Directors of five national laboratories toured NDSU in the fall of 2007, at the request of U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan and the Red River Valley Research Corridor. In early 2008, representatives from the NDSU Office of Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer visited two of the national laboratories to discuss NDSU research capabilities. Based on those meetings and further discussion, NDSU has been selected to conduct research projects for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., and for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Wash.

"Collaborating with federal research laboratories on projects is another indication that NDSU is building a reputation for national research excellence. This is an exciting start to future opportunities for faculty, staff and students," said NDSU President Joseph A. Chapman.

"Representatives from national laboratories who previously visited NDSU noted the mix of young student researchers and experienced researchers, saying the youth and dynamics add to the already impressive capabilities shown here," said Dr. Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU. "Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory offers an opportunity to showcase research expertise at NDSU, as we continue to build upon high-tech opportunities for the region."

Research Projects:

Project: Novel routes to silicon solar cells
In this project, NDSU and Sandia National Laboratories will explore how thin-film silicon solar cells can be made using a liquid form of silicon (a silane precursor developed by NDSU). Expertise and facilities at NDSU could produce chemistries that can be used in producing semi-conducting solar cell diodes. Results from this study will be used by NDSU and Sandia to guide future research and development leading to the potential manufacture of efficient and cost-effective printed silicon solar cells.

Project: Development of novel porous polymers for energy applications
In this project, NDSU and Sandia National Laboratories will partner for polymer research. NDSU will use its combinatorial chemistry expertise to assist in the development of polymers used in dielectrics, purification membranes for water and sensors. NDSU will use its combinatorial capabilities to rapidly produce unique polymer samples.

Project: Radio frequency identification and wireless sensor lab support (RWSL)
In this project, NDSU and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will partner on a larger version of an RFID and wireless sensor lab currently located at NDSU. Scientists at NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering will assist with expertise on how to design, establish and operate a large-scale RWSL facility.

About NDSU With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, North Dakota State University, Fargo, links academics to real world opportunities. As a metropolitan land grant institution with more than 12,500 students, NDSU is listed in the top 100 of several National Science Foundation annual research expenditure rankings in the areas of chemistry, physical sciences, psychology, agricultural sciences and social sciences. www.ndsu.edu/research

Research Team Advances Knowledge of Antarctica's Climate History | 8/6/2008

August 6, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—North Dakota State University researchers are among the leaders of a group of National Science Foundation-funded scientists who have discovered the last traces of tundra on the interior of Antarctica before temperatures began a relentless drop millions of years ago.

The collaboration's research, which resulted in a major advance in the understanding of Antarctica's climatic history, appears in the Aug. 4 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The international team of scientists headed up by NDSU geoscientists Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis and David Marchant, an earth scientist at Boston University, combined evidence from glacial geology, paleoecology, dating of volcanic ashes and computer modeling, to report a major climate change centered on 14 million years ago. The three scientists often spend months living in tents in the Transantarctic Mountains' Dry Valleys doing their research.

They have documented the timing and magnitude of the continent's shift from warm, temperate glaciers and fringing tundra to polar glaciers and polar tundra. "The contrast couldn't be more striking," Marchant said. "It is like comparing Tierra del Fuego today with the surface of Mars—and this transition took place over a geologically short interval of roughly 200,000 years."

According to Lewis, the discovery of lake deposits with perfectly preserved fossils of mosses, diatoms and ostracods is particularly exciting to scientists. "They are the first to be found even though scientific expeditions have been visiting the Dry Valleys since their discovery during the first Scott expedition in 1902–03," said Lewis.

For Ashworth, the fossils are a paleoecological treasure trove. He notes that some ancient species of diatoms and mosses are indistinguishable from the ones today, which occur throughout the world except Antarctica.

"To be able to identify living species amongst the fossils is phenomenal. To think that modern counterparts have survived 14 million years on Earth without any significant changes in the details of their appearances is striking," said Ashworth, the principal paleoecologist in the research. "It must mean that these organisms are so well-adapted to their habitats that in spite of repeated climate changes and isolation of populations for millions of years, they have not become extinct but have survived."

The fossil finds and dating of volcanic ash show that roughly 14.1 million years ago, the area was home to tundra, "wet" glaciers typical of those of the mountains of Tierra Del Fuego in the high southern latitudes and seasonally ice-free lakes. The beds of the long-gone lakes contain layers of sediments where dying plants and insects accumulated and were preserved.

The mean summertime temperatures would have dropped in that period by as much as 8 degrees Celsius. On average, the summertime temperatures in the Dry Valleys 14.1 million years ago would have been as much as 17 degrees warmer than the present-day average.

According to Lewis, the freshness of the crystals and glass in the volcanic ash and the preservation of cellular detail in the fossils indicate they have been permanently frozen since 13.9 million years ago.

NDSU Researchers Published in Chip Scale Review | 7/24/2008

July 24, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Smaller and faster are two goals in today's electronics market and an article in an international trade publication shows how North Dakota State University researchers design and build such electronics packages. A case study by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at North Dakota State University was published in the July 2008 issue of the Chip Scale Review magazine. "Case Study: Building a Two-Chip Stacked Package" is authored by Fred Haring, research technician; Chris Hoffarth, engineering technician; Syed Sajid Ahmad, manager of engineering services; John Jacobson, senior design engineer; and Aaron Reinholz, associate director of electronics technology. CNSE staff members Linda Leick, Darci Hansen, Matt Sharpe and Meridith Bell also contributed significantly to the project.

With the increasing demand for more functionality and smaller size with portable devices such as cell phones, mp3 players, and GPS units, the performance and size of individual electronic components have become critical. The case study details how CNSE researchers design and manufacture a chip scale package. Engineering a single package housing multiple chips stacked vertically one on top of the other results in smaller and more efficient packages for devices. For example, CNSE researchers have successfully reduced the size of two electronics components by 75 percent.

Two or more processors packaged in a single package will result in an overall package size smaller than each individual package, yet will have the combined computing power of the two individual integrated processors. The case study walks through this two-chip stacked package process at CNSE, discussing stacked-die design considerations, substrate limitations, stack configuration, assembly process, process documentation, wire bonding, laser marking, ball attaching, singulation, inspection, testing, and hallmark successes of system completion.

About the NDSU authors
Fred Haring received his bachelor's degree in archeology from Moorhead State University, Moorhead, Minn. Prior to joining the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at NDSU in 2002, Haring worked in the NDSU Industrial Engineering department as a facilities set-up and machinery technician. He is a fabrication technician for the surface mount technology and chip scale packaging lines.

Chris Hoffarth received his associate's degree in electronics technology from North Dakota State College of Science, Wahpeton, N.D. Hoffarth was a surface mount technician at Vancsco Electronics in Valley City, N.D., before joining CNSE at NDSU in 2005. He manages the surface mount technology and chip scale package lines.

NDSU Receives Federal Grant for Transmission Electron Microscope | 7/16/2008

July 16, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—No matter what your job, you need tools to do it. The same goes for scientific researchers and students. NDSU has been awarded $673,234 from the National Science Foundation in a grant that allows NDSU to acquire a new 200 kilovolt analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM). The equipment will be housed in NDSU's Electron Microscopy Center which has been under the direction of Professor Thomas Freeman and houses several electron microscopes.

The Major Research Instrumentation grant is under the direction of Kalpana Katti, Ph.D., NDSU professor of civil engineering, Jayma Moore, doctor of veterinary medicine and laboratory manager, and Scott Payne, assistant director of the electron microscopy center. "This instrument will have an immense impact on the materials and nanomaterials research on campus," according to Katti. "This instrument will have an electron energy loss detector which is the only experimental means to measure electronic properties of materials at the nanoscale."

A nanometer, for example, is a hundred-thousandth of the thickness of a human hair, or one-billionth of a meter. Working at such a miniature scale requires special equipment. Nanoscientists use tools like atomic force microscopes to scan surfaces with an incredibly fine tip and send data to a computer, which assembles the information and displays it graphically on a monitor. The atomic force microscopes communicate high resolution images through "touch" while telectron microscopes enable true "seeing" of the atomic scale.

The new transmission electron microscope will help prepare NDSU students for professional careers in high-tech fields, as well as advance research opportunities at NDSU. North Dakota State University offers an interdisciplinary program leading to a Ph.D. degree in Materials and Nanotechnology (MNT).

"This acquisition is an important step forward in maintaining a 21st century research infrastructure that will keep NDSU at the forefront of science and engineering at the nanoscale," said Philip Boudjouk, vice president of research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU.

Kalpana Katti is a university distinguished professor at NDSU and a recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER award, which recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of scholars who are likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. The National Science Foundation grant is titled "Multi-User Research Instrumentation: Acquisition of a Multi-Purpose Analytical High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Research Center in NDSU's Central Multi-User Microscopy Facility."

NDSU Nanoparticle Research Appears In Review Of Ophthalmology | 7/16/2008

July 16, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—While nanotechnology is being used in everything from paints to car exteriors, clothing and cosmetics, research is also underway using the technology to discover medical breakthroughs. Nanotech research by Professor Sanku Mallik and his group at North Dakota State University, Fargo, appears in the July issue of the Review of Ophthalmology in the article "Nanoparticles: Into the New Frontier."

The article by senior editor Christopher Kent notes that cutting-edge work is being done in North Dakota, Oklahoma and Florida. The promise of such research includes finding treatments for eye diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration. Sanku Mallik, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, conducts research that uses a nanoparticle called nanoceria as a drug delivery device. It is made of cerium oxide molecules. The brain-blood barrier can prevent medicines from reaching their therapeutic targets, but nanoparticles are so small they are capable of crossing the brain-blood barrier. Quoted in the article, Mallik notes, "So far, nanoceria appears to be nontoxic, but the drugs we attach to the particle might be toxic, so targeting molecules are necessary. These particles can also be used for imaging; we can attach molecules that can be made to glow after they reach targets such as cancer cells."

So far, the research of Mallik and his associates has been conducted in a controlled environment outside of a living organism and is in its initial stages. Researchers must ensure that the particles are water-soluble for effective delivery and less irritation to the cornea. Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness if left untreated, according to the Glaucoma Research Foundation. An estimated four million Americans have glaucoma but only half of them know it, according to Prevent Blindness America. Minnesota Twins center fielder Kirby Puckett (1960-2006) was forced to retire due to loss of vision in one eye from glaucoma. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in Americans older than 50, affecting more than two million people, according to the American Academy of Opththalmology.

The pharmaceutical research of Mallik's team includes attaching anti-cancer drugs to the nanoparticles and targeting molecules so particles only enter cells that are in need of treatment. Nanotechnology is often defined as the science of the extremely small. A nanometer, for example, is a hundred-thousandth of the thickness of a human hair, or one-billionth of a meter.

Mallik recently received a five-year, $1.46 million grant from the National Cancer Institute. D. K. Srivastava, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at NDSU, is the co-investigator on this award. It relies on the complementary scientific expertise of Mallik and Srivastava. The grant will allow the investigators to prepare selective, "multi-prong" inhibitors for matrix metalloproteinases using lipid-based nanoparticles. They also will use the nanoparticles for isozyme-selective detection of these enzymes.

Mallik received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, and his doctorate degree in organic chemistry at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. He completed post-doctoral work at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. He is a past recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER award, which recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of scholars who are likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. Information about Dr. Mallik's research is available at http://www.ndsu.edu/pharmsci/faculty_staff/sanku_mallik/.

Science Magazine Features NDSU Profs' Research in Antarctica | 6/20/2008

June 20, 2008, Fargo, ND—Field research in Antarctica by Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis, both professors in the Department of Geosciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is featured in the May 30 issue of Science magazine.

The article, "Freeze-Dried Findings Support a Tale of Two Ancient Climates" by journalist Douglas Fox, describes how the discovery of freeze-dried moss has provided evidence about the climate millions of years ago in the Dry Valleys of the icy continent. The ancient plant material indicates there was a tundra-like ecosystem in Antarctica 14 million years ago.

"For scientists, one of the premier journals is Science. Their readership cuts across disciplines and is truly global in extent," Ashworth said of the journal.

Ashworth and Lewis have studied fossilized vegetation in Antarctic lakebeds, collecting fossils of plants, mollusks and insects that help to determine past climate changes. During four expeditions, Ashworth and colleagues have collected hundreds of pounds of rock from which fossils have been extracted and studied by researchers around the world. The fossils and dated volcanic ash found at the site indicate that an abrupt climatic cooling occurred about 14 million years ago, marking the transition to the permanent ice sheets that cover the continent today.

The research described here is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation's Polar Programs.

The Science article can be found here.

The work of Ashworth and Lewis is also featured in the documentary "Ice People" by Anne Aghion. The documentary premiered at the San Francisco International Film Festival and in New York at the American Museum of Natural History's Polar Year Weekend earlier this year.

NDSU Chemistry Professor Receives NSF CAREER Award | 6/20/2008

Burghaus' educational plans include the development of a hands-on course that will be taught at an American Indian community college, as well as developing the physical chemistry laboratory course to include a cutting edge research topic in nanoscience.

Some of the experiments will be conducted as part of a physical chemistry laboratory class providing an introduction about nanoscience and kinetics to the students. A related off-campus, hands-on class also will be taught at American Indian community colleges as part of the Sunday Academy, a NATURE program of the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research which promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs.

Burghaus is the 11th young faculty member at NDSU to receive the prestigious National Science Foundation's CAREER award. The National Science Foundation's CAREER awardees at NDSU over the past 10 years have received more than $4.2 million in grants to conduct research in chemistry, civil and electrical engineering, coatings and polymeric materials. The National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Program recognizes and supports the early career development of faculty who show remarkable potential to become academic leaders. CAREER awardees are selected on the basis of creative, integrative and effective research and education development plans.

For more information.

"A New Study Out of NDSU Examines the Responses of Fathers to Educational Materials on Parenting—Fathers Respond to Parenting Newsletters" | 6/13/2008

June 13, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Kids don't come with instruction books. Ask any parent what they would like as soon as they start raising children, and you are likely to hear that what they really want is a how-to manual on parenting. With Father's Day around the corner, a recently published study suggests fathers benefit from educational materials that provide tips on raising children. Father Times, a parenting newsletter designed for fathers of young children, is valued more highly by fathers as an information source on raising children than other sources such as doctors, books, magazines, and the Internet.

According to the study from researchers at North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., fathers appreciate parenting messages designed specifically for them. The study on how fathers perceive and respond to the resource is published in a recent issue of the Journal of Extension, an academic journal that focuses on practical research and programs to benefit individuals, families, and communities.

"What is unique about Father Times as a parenting resource," notes NDSU associate professor Sean Brotherson, "is that it was developed locally in the Fargo–Moorhead area and it is now being used nationally and even internationally." Brotherson developed the parenting newsletter with Kim Bushaw, who now runs early childhood family education programs in the Moorhead, Minn., school system. An associate professor and extension family life specialist at NDSU, Brotherson said that recent requests to use the newsletter have come from as far away as Germany, India, and Guam.

In their study on how fathers perceive and use the newsletter as a parenting resource, Brotherson and his graduate student Chris Bouwhuis discovered that men appreciate being offered something just for them as parents. "Nine out of ten felt it was interesting and informative, and nine out of ten also said it was useful in their everyday parenting," said Brotherson.

One of the purposes of the study was to better understand how men get information about parenting and family life. While mothers often look to formal sources of information, the study showed that fathers typically turn first to informal sources of information such as relatives or friends to get ideas on parenting.

The five sources of information rated most highly by fathers of young children were:

  • Spouses or mothers of the father"s child
  • Parents, relatives, and in-laws
  • Friends
  • Other fathers or father figures
  • The Father Times newsletter

The study results also gave insight into the parenting topics of interest to men, with fathers indicating the most appreciation for information on activities to do with kids, child development, communication with children, children's emotions, reading with children, and child guidance.

"Men appreciate recognition of their efforts and needs as parents, not just at Father's Day, but in the information we give to them about parenting," said Brotherson. "It's important to consider their needs and views in the area of family life more often than just once a year. This resource allows us to reach out to men on a regular basis and help them get the information that will be useful to them in their parenting efforts and decisions."

Researcher:
Sean Brotherson—(701) 231-6143, sean.brotherson@ndsu.edu

Resource:
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/familyscience/father-times—This website has information about the Father Times newsletter resource for fathers and father figures of young children.

Making the Case That Fathers Count—A Lot | 6/12/2008

June 12, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—New fathers don't receive a how-to manual when they hold their little bundle of joy for the first time. The book Why Fathers Count: The Importance of Fathers and Their Involvement With Children, provides information and tips for fathers and those who support them at all stages of parenting—from new fathers to grandfathers. It also contains information and insight on fathers and families on a wide variety of topics such as fathers and daughters, fathers and play, working fathers, fathers who are divorced and fathers and a child’s education.

According to the book, the most important work that men do is being totally involved in the lives of their children and families. This contemporary edited anthology focuses on key issues in fathering and father involvement. The book is edited by Sean Brotherson, associate professor of family science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., and Joseph White, research scientist at the Institute for Research and Evaluation, Salt Lake City, Utah. It is available at www.mensstudies.com.

"In a culture that questions the value of men in family life, we need a compelling perspective on what men can contribute to their families and communities, as well as insight on the ways in which fathers and father figures make a meaningful difference," said Brotherson.

According to Why Fathers Count, contemporary research generally shows that children deprived of a positive relationship with their father may be at increased risk for problems such as drug abuse, delinquency, depression or compromised performance in school. In response to this research, Why Fathers Count provides insight and practical strategies for fathers to connect with their children and families, such as:

  • Be involved in shared activities (recreational activities, play, homework, important events)
  • Read regularly with children and be involved in their education
  • Participate in spiritual activities with children
  • Share exchanges of time, love and affection
  • Mentor children in developing skills and confidence
  • Connect through sharing memories and telling stories

These practical strategies are a small sample of the suggestions and insight that Why Fathers Count offers readers. The book serves as a resource for fathers, as well as for professionals who teach parenting skills or wish to understand and support positive father involvement.

"More must be done to address the issue of fatherhood and the future of our children. Therefore, we hope that one of the contributions of this book will be its ability to communicate the power of a father's love in the life of a child," said White. Authors of the book point out that building strong bonds between fathers and their children not only affects families, but also carries societal benefits.

Commenting on the book, Joseph Pleck, professor of family studies at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and current editor of the journal Fathering, said, "Why Fathers Count makes the most comprehensive case available today for the importance of fathering."

Contributing authors to this contemporary anthology on the importance of father involvement include some of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, including: Ken R. Canfield, Ph.D., National Center for Fathering; Paul Dixon, Ph.D., University of North Texas; David C. Dollahite, Ph.D., Brigham Young University; H. Wallace Goddard, Ph.D., CFLE, University of Arkansas; Stephen D. Green, Ph.D., Texas A&M University; J. Michael Hall, M.Ed., Strong Fathers-Strong Families; Glen Palm, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University; Rob Palkovitz, Ph.D., University of Delaware; Vicky Phares, Ph.D., University of South Florida; Neil Tift, M.A., National Practitioners Network on Fathers and Families; and Randell Turner, Ph.D., Fathers Workshop of York County.

NDSU Prof's Mummy Research Part of National Geographic Explorer | 6/2/2008

June 2, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Human remains yield secrets. And some of those secrets unearthed by Dr. Heather Gill-Robinson of North Dakota State University are part of "Mystery of the Mummy Murders" on the television program Explorer on the National Geographic Channel. Gill-Robinson, assistant professor of anthropology at North Dakota State University, Fargo, specializes in research on 2000-year-old peat bog mummies in Europe, preserved from the Iron Age with amazing detail.

Gill-Robinson previously made a significant discovery regarding a bog body once known as Windeby Girl, found in Germany. After further research using tools such as 3-D imaging and trace element analysis, Gill-Robinson discovered that Windeby Girl was most likely a young man.

Gill-Robinson shared many of her research findings with the crew filming the Wednesday episode of Explorer.

Additional information, photos and a video clip of "Mystery of the Mummy Murders" can be found here.

The NDSU professor's research has also appeared in "From the Depths of the Bog" in the May 2008 issue of National Geographic World magazine, German edition. In the science magazine for children, Dr. Gill-Robinson shares age-appropriate insights about her research involving bog bodies in Germany.

The National Geographic World article notes that bog bodies provide historical clues to how people lived. "I like puzzles and the bog bodies are puzzles from the past," says Gill-Robinson in the article. Photos of numerous anthropological findings and information on how bogs form are included in the magazine. "I think it's another way to help inspire scientific curiosity in young people who may have an interest in physical anthropology," says Gill-Robinson, who frequently speaks to community groups about her research findings.

Gill-Robinson also presented at the 77th annual meeting of the Paleopathology Association (PPA) and at the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in Columbus, Ohio, earlier this year. Her presentation on the Evidence-Based Approach in Mummy Studies was co-authored with Frank Rühli of the University of Zurich. Gill-Robinson and NDSU student James Schanandore, a McNair scholar, delivered a poster presentation on the curvature of the spine in an Iron Age bog body and a podium presentation relating to age estimation in an Iron Age bog body. The image analysis was completed in the NDSU Biological Anthropology Research Laboratory (BARL).

The water and other substances in peat bogs create a natural preservative for the bodies found in them, though Dr. Gill-Robinson says researchers are still trying to determine why. The lack of oxygen, antimicrobial action and the sphagnum found in bogs seem to conspire to preserve the bodies tossed into them thousands of years ago.

Gill-Robinson's areas of research interest have focused on a collection of several bodies (six mummies and one skeleton) from peat bogs in northern Germany. Her research was previously cited in the article, "Rehabilitation of a Moorland Corpse," in Abenteuer Archaeologie, a German popular press archaeology magazine, and in the article "Tales from the Bog" in the September 2007 issue of National Geographic magazine.

Tolstedt Joins NDSU Technology Transfer Office/Goswami Awarded Scholarship | 5/19/2008

May 19, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Jonathan Tolstedt has been named licensing associate and patent agent in the Technology Transfer Office at North Dakota State University (NDSU) and the NDSU Research Foundation (NDSU/RF) and Jaideep (Joy) Goswami has received the Bremer Scholarship from the Association of University Technology Managers.

Tolstedt joins the Technology Transfer Office and the NDSU/RF office with engineering experience from Rockwell Collins Commercial Avionics Division and Phoenix International. He has been a lecturer at NDSU and a business development specialist at Phoenix International. Tolstedt also previously served as president and founder of Brainstorm Consulting in Fargo, N.D. He received his bachelor's of science degree in electrical engineering from South Dakota State University and his master's degree in computer science from the University of Iowa.

Tolstedt's responsibilities in the Technology Transfer Office include evaluating inventions for market and patent feasibility and facilitating intellectual property agreements on behalf of the University. His responsibilities with the NDSU/RF include facilitating the patent and other protection of University-developed inventions, marketing and licensing the inventions to industry.

The Howard Bremer Scholarship awarded to Joy Goswami honors students and staff who pursue a career in technology transfer. Goswami received an honorarium and was recognized at the AUTM Annual Meeting. He was one of five selected for the honor. The scholarship’s goal is to foster educational opportunities for individuals who are committed to the vision of technology transfer. Joy holds a master's degree in molecular biology from the University of Delhi, India, and a master's degree in business administration from St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn.

The NDSU Technology Transfer Office (NDSU/TTO) and NDSU/RF, led by Dale Zetocha, serve as links between the University and industry. NDSU/TTO aims to effectively protect the inventor and NDSU intellectual property developed in research and NDSU/RF supports the transfer of University technologies to the marketplace. The offices include: Joycelyn Lucke, technology transfer assistant who received her juris doctorate from the University of North Dakota Law School, administrative assistant Tamra Maddock and administrative secretary Lesha Page.

"Ice People" Premieres at San Francisco International Film Festival—Features Extreme Science of NDSU Geosciences Researchers | 4/24/2008

April 24, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—The premiere of "Ice People" is set for the 2008 San Francisco International Film Festival on April 26, 28 and 30 at the Sundance Kubuki Cinemas. The film features North Dakota State University Professors Allan Ashworth, Adam Lewis, and students Kelly Gorz and Andrew Podoll, in an Antarctic expedition filmed by a documentary crew led by Anne Aghion. The Emmy Award-winning Aghion spent four months at the U.S. research station McMurdo, and camped out for seven weeks with Dr. Ashworth and his research crew as they studied fossilized vegetation in Antarctic lakebeds.

Appearing in the film is Ashworth, a distinguished professor of geosciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, as he conducts a research expedition amidst the austere landscape of Antarctica where the earth's climate history is frozen in time. The Antarctic summer provides 24 hours of daylight, along with challenging weather conditions and temperatures of 25 degrees below zero Fahrenheit.

Ashworth's research in Antarctica includes collecting fossils of plants, mollusks and insects which help scientists determine climate changes that enveloped the earth millions of years ago. Over four expeditions, Ashworth and his colleagues have collected hundreds of pounds of rock from which fossils will be extracted and studied by researchers worldwide. "The fossils provide detailed information about the climate," says Ashworth. The team's discoveries of volcanic ash in the deposits can be dated using radioactive isotopes in the crystals. "The fossils and the dates indicate that an abrupt climatic cooling occurred about 14 million years ago, marking the transition to the permanent ice sheets which cover the continent today," according to Ashworth.

For scientists and the film crew of Ice People, adapting to the conditions of the beautiful and inhospitable landscape of Antarctica is crucial. View the film trailer and other information at www.icepeople.com. Information about Dr. Ashworth's research is available at www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/ashworth/.

The research of Ashworth, Lewis and other colleagues has been featured in The Washington Post, The Scientist, and GEO magazine. Ashworth also serves as chair for the U.S. National Committee for the International Union for Quaternary Research and vice president for the International Quaternary Association.

Note: The research of Dr. Allan Ashworth described here is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation’s Polar Programs. The film "Ice People" is a co-production of Dry Valleys Productions, ARTE France, ITVS International, in association with Sundance Channel and is produced with a grant from the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.

For more information:

Ice People

Exploring Antarctica

The Scientist

Young Artists Create Sculpture at NDSU Downtown on Friday, April 18 | 4/18/2008

April 18, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Art students from area high schools are joining Jonathan Pellitteri at NDSU Downtown to create a unique outdoor sculpture with fabric, wood, rope and other materials on the plaza east of the building at 650 NP Avenue. The project runs from 9 A.M. to noon on Friday, April 18. Pellitteri is the 2008 James Rosenquist Artist in Residence at NDSU. He has been a visiting artist at the Department of Visual Arts at North Dakota State University for the spring 2008 semester, interacting with students, holding public lectures and opening his studio to visitors.

The Art Education Day allows high school artists to participate in creating a project with NDSU’s artist in residence. Students from area high schools are scheduled to attend the event. They will create a 30' wide wall reminiscent of the work of sculptor Richard Serra. The project will be on display through the end of the semester at the NDSU Downtown campus outdoor courtyard.

Pellitteri's focus as a sculptor is to reach the public with works representing his observations of the world around him. He notes that each time he works in a fresh place, his artwork develops in unexpected and exciting directions. Pulling from his experiences in construction as a mason and carpenter, Pellitteri handles various mediums and processes and introduces new materials and methods into his work. More information about Pellitteri can be found online at www.jonathanpellitteri.com.

Pellitteri received his master of fine arts degree in studio art at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. He holds a bachelor's of fine arts degree in sculpture from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. His travels have included study abroad in Cortona, Italy. Pellitteri's work has been exhibited in The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, as well as galleries in New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia and Connecticut. He was recently awarded the International Sculpture Center (ISC) Sculpture Residency in Switzerland with sculptor Heinz Aeschlimann.

The James Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program for Visual Arts at NDSU honors James Rosenquist. Born in Grand Forks, N.D., Rosenquist is considered one of the greatest living artists of the Pop Art movement of North America. His work and career are internationally known. James Rosenquist was awarded an honorary doctorate from North Dakota State University in May 2005.

R+D Showcase: "Impacting Locally—Reaching Globally" Begins Wednesday at the Fargodome | 4/15/2008

April 15, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—It's a small world in a global economy. Learn how North Dakota's economy is being shaped by research and technology developments at the R+D Showcase, April 16–17 at the Fargodome. Find out more about how North Dakota's research universities and Centers of Excellence are working with state, federal and private sectors to spur technology-led economic development.

The R&D Showcase will open with the North Dakota Economic Development Centers of Excellence Summit and concurrent sessions on Wed., April 16 from noon to 7 P.M. The Showcase continues on Thurs., April 17 from 7:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M

The two-day showcase coordinated by the NDSU Research & Technology Park will offer information about technology developments in advanced electronics, aerospace, agriculture, energy, life sciences, manufacturing and information technology. Participants will discover how to partner in these technology initiatives; learn more about R&D tax credits; identify global opportunities; hear about North Dakota’s technology businesses; and learn how federal, state, local and university research partnerships fuel economic development.

Keynote speakers on Wednesday include: Dan Berglund, CEO of State Science & Technology Institute, and Troy Kraft, vice president for global engineering at Bobcat Company. Thursday’s keynote speakers include Jeffrey Black, chairman and CEO of Teleflex, Inc.; Roger Brown, technology and innovation manager at Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings; Dr. Alton Romig, sr. vice president for integrated technology programs at Sandia National Laboratories; and Mr. Brian Mortenson, president of Sanford Health Foundation.

NDSU Researchers Recognized for Top-Cited Scientific Article | 3/14/2008

March 14, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—A scientific article by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at North Dakota State University has been named one of the most cited articles published in the Journal of Combinatorial Chemistry in 2006 by the American Chemical Society (ACS). Authors of the article on coatings are Shane Stafslien, senior research specialist; Jim Bahr, senior research engineer; NDSU graduates Jason Feser and Jon Weisz; Bret Chisholm, senior research scientist; Thomas Ready, former senior research associate; and Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer.

The article is titled "Combinatorial Materials Research Applied to the Development of New Surface Coatings I: A Multiwell Plate Screening Method for the High-Throughput Assessment of Bacterial Biofilm Retention on Surfaces."
The article details a new and effective biological screening workflow to rapidly evaluate the performance of new antifouling marine coatings developed using robotic equipment within the Combinatorial Materials Research Laboratory at North Dakota State University. The article is featured on the ACS Publications Web site as one of the Most-Cited Articles published in 2006 and cited through the period ending December 31, 2007.

Most-Cited Articles listed are based on data from Thomson Web of Science®. When scientists conduct research, they often refer to groundbreaking work published by other researchers as they conduct experiments and publish results of research that add to the body of scientific knowledge.

About the NDSU Authors
Shane Stafslien received a bachelor's degree in microbiology from NDSU. He previously served as an analytical chemist in the pharmaceutical industry at PRACS Institute, Ltd., Fargo, N.D. Stafslien joined the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering at NDSU in 2002. He manages day-to-day operations of the CNSE high-throughput biological screening laboratory.

James Bahr received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from NDSU. Prior to joining the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at NDSU in 2002, Bahr served as a staff engineer at TDA Research Inc., Wheat Ridge, Colo. He works with researchers in designing and fabricating custom lab equipment in the NDSU Combinatorial Materials Research Lab.

Bret Chisholm, Ph.D., received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from NDSU and his Ph.D. in polymer science from the University of Southern Mississippi. Chisholm was employed by General Electric prior to joining CNSE at NDSU in 2004. Chisholm directs the Combinatorial Materials Research Laboratory within CNSE. He is also an adjunct professor for the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials.

Philip Boudjouk, Ph.D., has served as NDSU's first vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer since 2000. Boudjouk has been active as a teacher, researcher, and member of the NDSU Department of Chemistry faculty since 1973. During his tenure as vice president, research expenditures at NDSU have increased from $44 million to more than $106 million. Boudjouk's research career has focused on organometallic chemistry. He has more than 130 refereed publications in international journals and holds 19 patents.

About ACS
With more than 160,000 members, the American Chemical Society (ACS) is the world's largest scientific society and one of the world's leading sources of authoritative scientific information. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences.

R+D Showcase: "Impacting Locally—Reaching Globally" Set for April 16 to 17 at Fargodome | 2/26/2008

February 26, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—It's a small world in a global economy. Learn how North Dakota's economy is being shaped by research and technology developments at the R+D Showcase, April 16–17 at the Fargodome. Find out more about how North Dakota's research universities and Centers of Excellence are working with state, federal and private sectors to spur technology-led economic development.

The two-day showcase coordinated by the NDSU Research & Technology Park will offer information about technology developments in advanced electronics, aerospace, agriculture, energy, life sciences, manufacturing and information technology. Participants will discover how to partner in these technology initiatives; learn more about R&D tax credits; identify global opportunities; hear about North Dakota's technology businesses; and learn how federal, state, local and university research partnerships fuel economic development.

Keynote speakers include: Mr. Yongmaan Park, chairman of Doosan Infracore Co. (parent company of Bobcat Company); Mr. Dan Berglund, CEO of State Science & Technology Institute; Mr. Jeffrey Black, chairman and CEO of Teleflex, Inc.; and Mr. Roger Brown, technology and innovation manager at Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings. State and local economic development officials, as well as university researchers, will cover developments in technology, successful partnerships and programs and their statewide impacts.

"North Dakota is quickly developing a leadership role in cutting-edge research and development," said Bill Goetz, chancellor of the North Dakota University System. "Continued success is highly dependent upon dedicated partnerships among the North Dakota University System, the private sector and policymakers."

North Dakota State University is hosting the event. "The world-class research being conducted and partnerships being forged are bringing many new opportunities to the region," said NDSU President Joseph A. Chapman. "At this conference, we are bringing together experts who will share their strategies for success."

The R&D Showcase will open with the North Dakota Economic Development Centers of Excellence Summit and concurrent sessions on Wed., April 16 from noon to 7 p.m. "The R&D showcase is an opportunity for businesses to learn about the research capacity that exists on our campuses. It's also an opportunity for businesses to learn how the Centers of Excellence program, tapped by campuses throughout the state, can help them innovate, grow and remain competitive in a global market," according to Shane Goettle, commissioner of the North Dakota Department of Commerce. The Showcase continues on Thurs., April 17 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. with general sessions on technology-based initiatives, federal energy research, global opportunities and private sector perspectives. Thursday also includes concurrent sessions showcasing opportunities to develop and commercialize new technologies through research and development among universities, government and the private sector.

Sponsors of the R+D Showcase: "Impacting Locally—Reaching Globally" include:

Public Sponsors
North Dakota University System
North Dakota Department of Commerce/Centers of Excellence Commission
North Dakota State University
University of North Dakota
ND EPSCoR

Gold Sponsors
Aldevron, LLC
Bobcat Company
Flint Communications
Forum Communications Company
Gate City Bank
Greater Fargo Moorhead Economic Development Corporation
Lee & Smith
Microsoft
Monsanto
US Bank

Silver Sponsors
Alien Technology
Bank of North Dakota
IdeaOne Telecom Group, LLC
Praxis Strategy Group
Xcel Energy

Rosenquist Artist in Residence at NDSU Awarded Swiss Sculpture Residency | 2/19/2008

February 19, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Jonathan Pellitteri, the 2008 James Rosenquist Artist in Residence at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has been awarded the International Sculpture Center (ISC) Sculpture Residency in Switzerland with sculptor Heinz Aeschlimann.

Pellitteri was selected through a competitive process to participate with Aeschlimann and his wife Gertrud, art advocate, collector and art patron in an inter-cultural experience. The program is designed to allow the selected sculptor up to six weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Aeschlimann at their home/studio in Zofingen, Switzerland. The residency will provide an opportunity to work directly with Heinz Aeschlimann at his studio. Additionally, the Aeschlimanns will provide support in the creation of Pellitteri's work while in residence. The experience will culminate with an exhibition of work created by Pellitteri during the residency.

At the end of his residency, Pellitteri will write an article about his experience to be published in Sculpture magazine's Insider (ISC Member newsletter) and on the ISC Website. It is an honor to receive this award for emerging artist.

As the current James Rosenquist Artist in Residence at NDSU, Pellitteri is spending the semester interacting with students, holding public lectures and opening his studio to visitors. His focus as a sculptor is to reach the public with works representing his observations of the world around him. Using his experiences as a mason and carpenter, Pellitteri handles various mediums and processes to introduce new materials and methods into his work. According to Pellitteri, his goal is not to be the impetus for global change, but to quietly intrigue viewers with his sculptures and impart a curiosity of the objects that fill lives and inspire individual evaluations of how they are influenced by them. An exhibit of Pellitteri's works will be held at the NDSU Downtown Gallery, Fargo, April 8–24, 2008.

Pellitteri received his master of fine arts degree in studio art at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. He holds a bachelor's of fine arts degree in sculpture from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. His travels have included study abroad in Cortona, Italy. Pellitteri's work has been exhibited in The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans.

The James Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program for Visual Arts at NDSU honors James Rosenquist. Born in Grand Forks, N.D., Rosenquist is considered one of the greatest living artists of the Pop Art movement of North America. His work and career are internationally known. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from North Dakota State University in May 2005.

"Ice People" Features Extreme Science of NDSU Geosciences Researchers—Film Preview at American Museum of Natural History | 1/31/2008

January 31, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—Extreme sports are one thing, but how about extreme science? North Dakota State University professor Allan Ashworth will be a featured guest at a preview presentation of the film "Ice People" during the American Museum of Natural History’s Polar Year weekend on Feb. 2–3 in New York City. NDSU professors Allan Ashworth, Adam Lewis, and students Kelly Gorz and Andrew Podoll, were part of the expedition filmed by a documentary crew led by Emmy-winning filmmaker Anne Aghion, who spent seven weeks in the field capturing the work of the expedition.

Ashworth, a distinguished professor of geosciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, conducts research expeditions to one of the coldest places in the world, where the earth's climate history is frozen in time. The expeditions are held in the Antarctic summers where there is 24 hours of daylight, but challenging weather conditions and temperatures of 25 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. "Imagine living in a tent for weeks on end using only a portable camp stove for heat," says Ashworth.

Ashworth's research in Antarctica includes collecting fossils of plants, mollusks and insects which help scientists determine climate changes that enveloped the earth millions of years ago. Over four expeditions, Ashworth and his colleagues have collected hundreds of pounds of rock from which fossils will be extracted and studied by researchers worldwide. "The fossils provide detailed information about the climate—how warm it was," says Ashworth. "For moss to be growing in the center of Antarctica, it had to be much warmer and wetter than it is today." The team’s discoveries of volcanic ash in the deposits can be dated using radioactive isotopes in the crystals. "The fossils and the dates indicate that an abrupt climatic cooling occurred about 14 million years ago, marking the transition to the permanent ice sheets which cover the continent today," according to Ashworth.

For scientists and the film crew of Ice People, adapting to the conditions of the beautiful and inhospitable landscape of Antarctica is crucial. "You are always aware of the danger of cold," Ashworth says. "You can never misplace your gloves or your hat. If you want to brush your teeth, you need to put the toothpaste in the sleeping bag with you or it will be solid in the morning." "We previewed the film in a private showing in Fargo," says Ashworth. "Looking at yourself on a big screen larger than life is a little intimidating. But the film captures the beauty and ruggedness of Antartica." Information about Dr. Ashworth's research is available at www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/ashworth/.

The research of Ashworth, Lewis and other colleagues has been featured in The Washington Post, The Scientist, GEO magazine and in the future is scheduled to be part of a NOVA television program on climate change. Ashworth also serves as chair for the U.S. National Committee for the International Union for Quaternary Research and vice president for the International Quarternary Association.

Note: The research of Dr. Allan Ashworth described here is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation's Polar Programs. The film "Ice People" is a co-production of Dry Valleys Productions, ARTE France, ITVS International, in association with Sundance Channel and is produced with a grant from the National Science Foundation's Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.

For more information:

Ice People

Exploring Antarctica

The Scientist

NDSU Welcomes Sculptor as James Rosenquist Artist in Residence | 1/15/2008

January 15, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—NDSU will introduce its James Rosenquist Artist in Residence, sculptor Jonathan Pellitteri, to the community and representatives of local arts groups at a presentation and reception on Thursday, Jan. 24 at 5:30 p.m. at the NDSU Downtown Campus, Room 114. Through the residency program, Pellitteri will work spring semester 2008 interacting with students, holding public lectures and opening his studio to visitors.

"NDSU is delighted to welcome our second Rosenquist Artist in Residence," said President Joseph A. Chapman. "After its successful launch a year ago, I am thrilled that we are able to continue offering this unique opportunity to students, as they learn from an outstanding artist."

Pellitteri's focus as a sculptor is to reach the public with works representing his observations of the world around him. Using his experiences as a mason and carpenter, Pellitteri handles various mediums and processes to introduce new materials and methods into his work. According to Pellitteri, his goal is not to be the impetus for global change, but to quietly intrigue viewers with his sculptures and impart a curiosity of the objects that fill lives and inspire individual evaluations of how they are influenced by them.

Pellitteri received his master of fine arts degree in studio art at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. He holds a bachelor's of fine arts degree in sculpture from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. His travels have included study abroad in Cortona, Italy. Pellitteri’s work has been exhibited in The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, as well as galleries in New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia and Connecticut.

The James Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program for Visual Arts at NDSU honors James Rosenquist. Born in Grand Forks, N.D., Rosenquist is considered one of the greatest living artists of the Pop Art movement of North America. His work and career are internationally known. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from North Dakota State University in May 2005.

NDSU Gains Research Subcontract | 1/2/2008

January 2, 2008, Fargo, N.D.—North Dakota State University mechanical engineering and applied mechanics faculty members Chad Ulven, assistant professor; Alan Kallmeyer, associate professor and interim chair; and Ghodrat Karami, associate professor, have received a $225,281 subcontract from SpaceAge Synthetics Inc., Fargo, as part of a $1.3 million project between the U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division and SpaceAge Synthetics Inc.

The project, funded through federal defense appropriations announced by Sen. Byron Dorgan, focuses on improving the performance of the Spartan, an unmanned Navy patrol vessel. This project will be used to demonstrate whether the vessel's performance can be improved by significantly reducing the vessel’s weight by replacing engine covers and other components with components made from composite materials. The subcontract will be used in the development of applications of SpaceAge Synthetics Inc., Thermo-Lite composite materials for the U.S. Navy's unmanned surface vehicles and mission modules.

Ulven, Kallmeyer and Karami will conduct quasi-static and dynamic property tests, fire exposure evaluation, complete material characterization and finite element modeling of SpaceAge Synthetics Inc., E-glass/rigid polyurethane foam sandwich composites for the design and implementation of components aboard the U.S. Navy's unmanned surface vehicles and mission modules. The implementation of lightweight structural composites in the unmanned naval vessels may improve their speed and maneuverability, allow for greater payload and additional fuel capabilities, as well as reducing their radar signature.

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