Press Room

Research News Releases—2011
 

NDSU Alumnus, Faculty Receive ‘Best Paper Award’ I 12/21/2011

December 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Charles A. Briggs, PhD ’10, transportation and logistics, received the “Best Paper Award” from the International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines for the paper, “Managing and Mitigating the Upstream Petroleum Industry Supply Chain Risks: Leveraging Analytic Hierarchy Process.” The paper was co-written with Denver Tolliver and Joseph Szmerekovsky, both of NDSU.

The paper addresses the oil industry supply chain as it continues to grow longer and more complex, searching for ways to mitigate risks of disruption. The Analytic Hierarchy Process used in the study provides a decision support framework to cope with multiple criteria decision-making situations. Results from the analysis suggest the preferred method of mitigating the supply chain risk is to internalize and manage the risks, rather than pass them onto a third party.

According to its website, the International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines strives to promote excellence in public administration and all business disciplines through conferences and publications.

NDSU Fine Arts Director Presents at Conference I 12/21/2011

December 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — John Miller, director of the Division of Fine Arts at NDSU, chaired the nominating committee for the National Association of Schools of Music during 2010-11. The committee’s work resulted in the election of officers and committee on accreditation members during the annual convention. Miller, a past National Association of Schools of Music region chair and member of the Commission on Accreditation, also co-presented a pre-conference workshop for new music administrators titled "Managing from the Middle" and co-presented a conference session on administering effective faculty searches.

NDSU Business Faculty Publish Manuscript I 12/20/2011

December 20, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — William "Bud" Bowlin, professor of accounting and department head of accounting, finance and information systems at NDSU; Tom Dowdell, associate professor of accounting; and David Herda, assistant professor of accounting, had their manuscript, “Auditor Response to Earnings Management Through Real Transactions,” accepted for publication in Journal of Theoretical Accounting Research.

The authors said real earnings management is management actions that deviate from normal business practices and are undertaken to meet certain earnings thresholds. Prior research asserts that real earnings management does not result in increased scrutiny from regulators and auditors and cites this as an explanation for the switch from accrual-based to real earnings management after the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

In the paper, the authors investigate whether auditors respond to real earnings management by increasing engagement risk. Using a sample of 131 auditors at two accounting firms, they found that auditors would respond to real earnings management by raising risk, which indicates that auditors are concerned with such actions.

NDSU Business Student Receives Entrepreneurial Award I 12/20/2011

December 20, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Ryan Raguse, a senior majoring in accounting at NDSU, received the Collegiate Entrepreneur of the Year award during the Marketplace of Ideas awards program on Oct. 29 at the Sidney J. Lee Auditorium at Bismarck State College. Raguse is the owner of two start-up companies.

Myriad Devices LLC is a mobile application and consulting company. It built the new smartphone Winter Survival Kit application for NDSU Extension Service, which was featured on Fox News at http://video.foxnews.com/v/1305056548001/university- launches-snow-app.

The second company is VFM LLC, which stands for virtual farm manager and is a startup company that has raised investment funds for operations.

Raguse also is the founder of Entrepreneurs of NDSU.

Marketplace of Ideas provides education, support, mentorship, solutions and networking opportunities to inventors and entrepreneurs of all ages.

NDSU Undergraduate Students Present Research at Philosophy Conference I 12/20/2011

December 20, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Three NDSU students, Dominic Manthey, Jeff Rother and Spencer Ptacek, presented research at the 4th Annual Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Nov. 19 at Minnesota State University Moorhead.

Manthey, a senior double majoring in English and philosophy, presented “Existentialism and Buddhism: Problem of the Self.” He said it is a comparative research paper on the philosophical movement of Existentialism and its unique re-evaluation of a "self," which resembles some ancient Buddhist ideas.

Rother, a fifth-year senior graduating Dec. 16 with a double major in psychology and philosophy, presented “I and You.” He said the paper was inspired by the book "I and Thou" by Martin Buber and connections between that book, Edmund Husserl material and "A Grief Observed" by C.S. Lewis. 

Ptacek, a fourth-year student double-majoring in English and philosophy, presented “What’s the Difference? A Comparison of Sartre's Nothingness and Derrida's Différance." He said the paper examines of the work of the French philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Jacques Derrida, with specific emphasis on the philosophers' connection to literature.

Dennis Cooley, associate professor, and Vincent Wargo, lecturer, both in the Department of History, Philosophy and Religious Studies at NDSU, co-chaired the event.

The students say it is beneficial to present their work for a number of reasons. “It gives an opportunity to gain experience in public speaking. It looks very good on graduate school applications and resumes,” Rother said. “It also allows for critical analysis of your own and others' thoughts and ideas.”

NDSU Researcher Awarded Housing Needs Assessment Grant I 12/16/2011

December 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Richard Rathge, professor in the agribusiness and applied economics and sociology/anthropology departments at NDSU, and the staff at the North Dakota State Data Center received $142,001 from the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency to conduct a statewide housing needs assessment.

The purpose of the project is to enable the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency and local jurisdictions to better understand housing needs of low and moderate income people for housing and housing-related services to target and coordinate the use of federal, state and local resources available for housing.

A key component of the research will be projecting housing supply and demand to the year 2030 for all counties in the state and the state’s 20 most populated cities. This will be accomplished through a modeling procedure, which includes developing population projections by age and gender for the same time period.

“The key challenge we have is working with the very dynamic situation in western North Dakota created by energy development activities. Population growth in this region has increased at an unbelievable rate since 2005 and modeling its future direction is challenging,” Rathge said.

The project will be completed by September 2012 and results will be made available through an online resource tool available through the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency website.

FORWARD Announces New Faculty Workshop and Future Events and NDSU I 12/16/2011

December 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The FORWARD project will begin spring semester events at NDSU with “Enhancing Department Climate: Tips for New Faculty” scheduled for Monday, Jan. 9, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Memorial Union Arikara room. During the workshop, the FORWARD group will share tips for new faculty members on a successful transition to NDSU and on promoting a more inclusive department culture to create a vibrant and fulfilling intellectual community. The workshop has been offered in the fall as part of fall orientation for faculty, but this is the first time the event will be offered in the spring. Registration is requested at http://www.ndsu.edu/forward. Evaluations for past fall workshops can be found at  http://www.ndsu.edu/forward/advance_forward_initiatives/climate_workshops.

Additional FORWARD events in January include a promotion-to-professor and work-life balance luncheon and discussion facilitated by Harriet McCaul on Jan. 17, a series of presentations by speaker Joan Williams on excelling in academia on Jan. 20 and an open forum on faculty with disabilities on Jan. 31 in the Memorial Union Century Theater.

February events include ally training on Feb. 9, faculty search committee training on Feb. 14 and 16, and a lecture series by Scott Page on the power of diversity on Feb. 22 and 23. March events include a leadership workshop with Claudia and Ruben Fernandez on March 15. Further details about times and registration for these events, as well as other FORWARD events throughout the year, will be announced in future issues of It’s Happening at State and on the FORWARD website.

NDSU Civil Engineering Professor Visits University of Da Lat, Vietnam I 12/16/2011

December 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — G. Padmanabhan, professor of civil engineering at NDSU, visited with the environmental sciences faculty at the University of Da Lat, Da Lat City, Vietnam, Oct. 1 through Nov. 25 as part of his sabbatical. He interacted with faculty and students mainly through seminars and discussions on topics of environmental importance to Da Lat and Vietnam. He spent the majority of his time studying and discussing current environmental issues in Vietnam with hopes to develop collaborative research projects between NDSU and University of Da Lat.

Seminars presented to the faculty and students included:

  • Non-point source pollution of lakes
  • Environmental policy and regulations in the USA
  • Opportunities for Vietnamese students to pursue graduate studies at NDSU
  • What is expected of a graduate student and a faculty member at NDSU?

In addition, Padmanabhan was a guest of honor at the university graduation ceremony of graduate students. Padmanabhan also spoke at an event, which welcomes new students of the environmental sciences program at the invitation of Lam Ngoc Tuan, head of the department.

After discussions with the faculty at the University of Da Lat, Padmanabhan has identified three research areas of mutual interest – non-point source pollution of lakes, crop residue management and disposal, and climate impact on agriculture and sociological implications. 

ND EPSCoR Offers Assistantship Program for Graduate Students I 12/14/2011

December 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research provides competitive funding designed to increase graduate school opportunities for students from Dickinson State University, Mayville State University, Minot State University, Valley City State University and the state’s tribal colleges.

The Graduate Student Research Assistantship program supports master’s or doctoral degree applicants in science, engineering and mathematics at North Dakota’s two research universities, NDSU and the University of North Dakota. American Indian and Alaskan native applicants must have graduated from one of the N.D. tribal colleges or have been a participant in N.D. EPSCoR’s Nurturing American Tribal Undergraduate Research and Education (NATURE) program. 

Faculty and staff are invited to recruit students. Application reviews will begin Feb. 9, 2012, with a final deadline of noon, March 8, 2012. Program information and application requirements are at www.ndepscor.nodak.edu.

N.D. EPSCoR is a federally and state funded program designed to improve the ability of university researchers to compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in science, engineering and mathematics.

Questions can be directed to david.givers@ndsu.edu.

NDSU Assistant Professor Named Interdisciplinary Research Conference Chair I 12/12/2011

December 12, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Stephenson Beck, assistant professor of communication at NDSU, was selected as program chair for the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Researchers conference in 2013 in Chicago.

According to its website, scholars in the network study groups and teams across many social scientific disciplines such as communication, organizational behavior, psychology and sociology. It is the primary interdisciplinary association that advances theoretical and methodological understanding of group research group dynamics through interdisciplinary research.

As program chair, Dr. Beck will coordinate the solicitation, review and selection of research proposals for presentation at the conference.

NDSU Nursing Department Receives Grant to Help Diversify Health Care Workforce I 12/6/2011

December 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU’s Department of Nursing, in partnership with statewide organizations, received a four-year $1.9 million research and evaluation grant to help American Indian people become health care professionals and North Dakota’s health care workforce become more culturally diverse.

The NDSU department partnered with Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Mount Sinai Medical School, University of North Dakota College of Nursing Recruitment/Retention of American Indians into Nursing, North Dakota Area Health Education Center, North Dakota Center for Nursing and the North Dakota Department of Labor in a project titled “Sustaining Career Pathways for American Indian Health Professionals in ND: Building Apprenticeship and Workforce Options with the Next Steps Health Professions Opportunities Grant Project.” The purpose will be to enhance future employment options and sustainability of employment for Administration for Children and Families Next Steps program participants.

The ultimate outcome of this grant is to build a workforce that is culturally diverse and responsive to the significant health care needs of the American Indian population in North Dakota. Loretta Heuer, professor and principal investigator, indicated this grant will help build a sustainable career path for American Indian people to enter the professional health care workforce in North Dakota.

Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor and co-investigator at NDSU, said this is an exciting opportunity for the Department of Nursing. “We are looking forward to working in partnership with our statewide partners and tribal community college partners to better understand how to support a successful and culturally appropriate entry into nursing professions for Native American students,” she said.

NDSU Researchers to Publish Paper in Molecular Cancer Journal I 12/6/2011

December 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate in pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "β2-adrenoceptor blockage induces G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells via Ras/Akt/NFkB pathway,” which will be published by Molecular Cancer.

According to the authors, pancreatic cancer risk factors, smoking and stress, stimulate nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and catecholamines production respectively. Nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and catecholamine bind the β-adrenoceptors and induce pancreatic cancer cell proliferation; and they have previously indicated that β-adrenergic antagonists may suppress proliferation and invasion and stimulate apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. To clarify the mechanism of apoptosis induced by β2-adrenergic antagonist, they hypothesize that blockage of the β2-adrenoceptor could induce G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis and Ras may be a key player in pancreatic cancer cells.

Their results showed that the β1 and β2-adrenoceptor proteins were detected on the cell surface of pancreatic cancer cells from pancreatic carcinoma specimen samples by Immunohistochemistry. The β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118,551 significantly induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis compared with the β1-adrenergic antagonist metoprolol, which was determined by the flow cytometry assay. β2-adrenergic antagonist therapy significantly suppressed the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E and induced the activation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax by Western blotting. Additionally, the β2-adrenergic antagonist reduced the activation of NFkB in vitro cultured pancreatic cancer cells.

“The new pathway discovered in this study may provide an effective therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer,” Wu said. Collaborator for this paper is Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.

Molecular Cancer is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal interested in attracting high-quality original research and reviews that present or highlight significant advances in all areas of cancer and related biomedical science.

NDSU Fine Arts Faculty Present, Publish and Perform I 12/6/2011

December 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Kim Bromley, professor of painting and drawing, preseted at the Southeastern College Art Annual Conference, Nov. 9-12 in Savannah, Ga. He discussed his paper, "Hypnosis: A Creativity Enhancement Tool."  Bromley received support to attend the conference from the North Dakota Council on the Arts.

Douglas Monroe, assistant professor of clarinet at NDSU, was the featured soloist for the American premiere of Benjamin Britten's Movements for a Clarinet Concerto with the Grand Forks (N.D.) Symphony Orchestra.

An article by Virginia Sublett, NDSU professor of voice, was published in the College Music Society's College Music Symposium. Theh article, titled "Pierrot Lunaire at 95: Schoenberg's Music Hybrid and Twentieth-Century Vocal Chamber Music," was included in the publication at the request of the editor.

Warren Olfert, associate professor and director of bands, adjudicated at two marching band contests in October – the Mountain West Invitational Marching Contest at Idaho State University in Pocatello and the Kentucky State Marching Contest at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green.

NDSU Assistant Professor Presents on Teen Emergency Preparedness I 12/6/2011

December 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Carol Cwiak, assistant professor of emergency management at NDSU, was an invited speaker to the eighth annual Summit on Emergency and Disaster Planning for Colleges, Universities and K-12 Schools in Toronto.

Cwiak spoke about the value of educating teens on basic preparedness and response behaviors through a Federal Emergency Management Agency sponsored program called Teen Community Emergency Response Teams. NDSU's Department of Emergency Management has partnered with community organizations, local emergency management professionals, area first responders and local schools to offer the program in area schools since 2009.

NDSU's Department of Emergency Management played a key role in the delivery of the first Teen Community Emergency Response Teams pilot program in North Dakota at West Fargo High School in 2009. Since that time, hundreds of area teens have participated in the program’s offerings on their campuses. The Department of Emergency Management supports the program by supplying knowledgeable interns who help manage and facilitate the program.

Science Café to Explore Chemistry of Wine and Claims About its Health Benefits I 12/5/2011

December 5, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Little-known facts about wine will be revealed during the December Science Café. Gregory Cook, professor and chair of chemistry at NDSU, will present “Deconstructing Wine from a Chemist’s Perspective,” on Tuesday, Dec. 13, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

Cook said consumption of wine in the U.S. has risen steadily for at least the past 15 years. This has been spurred partly by recent news reports touting the health benefits of wine. From heart disease to cancer to Alzheimer's, wine seems to be a magic elixir to cure all. But what is wine and is it as healthy as we are told? During the presentation, Cook will describe how wine is produced, what antioxidants are and how to tell if wine is “corked.” He also will tell attendees where the vanilla flavor in wine comes from and discuss if wine can prevent cancer.

Attendees must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees.

NDSU Partners on New Flare Gas to Fertilizer Initiative I 12/5/2011

December 5, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU’s Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics is leading a new research initiative that seeks to evaluate the commercial feasibility of utilizing flare gas from the expanding western Bakken oilfield to produce anhydrous fertilizer. Funding for the $99,460 project comes from Agricultural Products Utilization Council ($59,960) and the North Dakota Corn Growers ($39,500). NDSU project leaders are Cole Gustafson, Greg McKee, David Saxowsky, Thein Maung and David Ripplinger.

Gustafson states the project presents a unique opportunity for North Dakota as both flare gas volumes and demand for nitrogen fertilizer increase. There are two main challenges in commercializing this opportunity – can flare gas from remote oil wells be economically collected? And are smaller scale commercial fertilizer production plants viable?

The University of North Dakota’s Energy and Environmental Research Center is going to assist with answering the second question by designing three alternative sized fertilizer plants that can be used in the economic feasibility analysis.

Project leaders say North Dakota agriculture will ultimately derive three benefits from the project. First is a new low cost source of nitrogen fertilizer. The existing fertilizer industry is highly concentrated with only a few international suppliers. A second benefit will be a more stable local supply of fertilizer. Fertilizer supplies in the past have been highly variable and producers at times have had difficulty obtaining sufficient supplies. 

Finally, the use of flare gas, which is a recycled product, will provide farmers with a renewable fertilizer product. Renewable fertilizer is in high demand from consumers who seek food products with a lower carbon footprint, the livestock industry that wants greater availability of renewable feeds and the production of renewable fuels. Use of a renewable fertilizer in corn production results in biofuels that have a lower carbon footprint. Biofuels with lower carbon footprints lead to significant market premiums in petroleum markets.

NDSU Assistant Professor Presents at Management Conference I 12/5/2011

December 5, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Derek Lehmberg, assistant professor of management at NDSU, presented his paper, "The Role of Adjacent Markets in Technological Development and Adoption: The Case of LCD TV," at the Strategic Management Society's annual conference in Miami in November.

The paper, which he co-wrote with Charles Dhanaraj of Indiana University, is part of Lehmberg's research on the flat panel display and television industries. Lehmberg's other recent contributions include two case studies, "Sharp Corporation: Beyond Japan" and "Pioneer Corporation: The NEC Plasma Opportunity," both published in 2011 by Ivey Case Publishing.

NDSU Grad Student Receives Best Student Poster Award I 12/2/2011

December 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Papia F. Rozario, doctoral student in the environmental and conservation science program, received the best student poster award and a $500 stipend for her research presentation, “Impact of Forest Cover Dynamics on Water Quality of Missouri Watershed Region,” at the 14th World Lake Conference, Oct. 31-Nov. 4 in Austin, Texas.

River Systems Institute based at Texas State University and the International Lake Environment Committee Foundation organized the conference.

The first World Lake Conference was held in 1984 at Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Since then, it has been held biennially in wide-ranging locations, including the United States, Hungary, China, Italy, Japan, Argentina, Denmark, Kenya and India. Established in 1986 as an international non-governmental organization collaborating with the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Lake Environment Committee worked with host organizations in these countries and promoted scientific approaches in lake basin management, particularly for improving the state of lake environments in developing countries. Project agencies/organizations involved with the conference include Global Environment Facility, International Lake Environment Committee Foundation, LakeNet, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, Shiga Prefectural Government, United Nations Development Programme, The World Bank and U.S. Agency for International Development.

Rozario’s research paper also will be published in the International Lake Environment Committee Foundation’s  peer-reviewed journal, “Lakes and Reservoirs: Research and Management.” She co-wrote the paper with her adviser Peter G. Oduor, associate professor of geosciences at NDSU, and Larry Kotchman, North Dakota State Forester.

New Free Smartphone App Aims to Help Stranded Winter Motorists I 12/2/2011

December 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — A new free smartphone application from the North Dakota State University Extension Service, Fargo, aims to help stranded motorists. The Winter Survival Kit app is available free for both Android and iOS systems.

The app is available for free in the Android Market (download now) and the Apple Store (download now).

According to its developers, the free Winter Survival Kit app helps motorists:
-Find their current geographic location
-Call 911
-Notify friends and family
-Calculate how long you can run your engine to keep warm on remaining fuel
-Designate emergency contacts you want to alert if you become stranded
-Store important phone and policy numbers for insurance or roadside assistance

The Winter Survival Kit app alerts motorists every 30 minutes with a reminder to turn off the vehicle’s engine periodically and check the vehicle’s exhaust pipe for snow buildup to help avoid deadly carbon monoxide
poisoning.

The Winter Survival Kit app also provides NDSU Extension Service information on how to put together a physical winter survival kit, prepare your vehicle for winter driving and stay safe when stranded in a storm or stuck in snow.

The app was developed by Myriad Devices, a company based in the NDSU Research and Technology Park Incubator, which was founded by students and faculty in the NDSU Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and College of Business. The NDSU Extension Service provided design and content input, and funded the project with a U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Smith-Lever Special Needs grant.

This is the second free smartphone app developed jointly by the NDSU Extension Service and Myriad Devices with NIFA support. Another app called The Disaster Recovery Journal app lets users record information about damages as they enter their flooded homes using text, images and audio, and provides Extension information on how to clean or deal with flood-damaged items.

Learn more about the apps at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/extension/apps
 
More information:
Download Winter Survival Kit app free for Android Market
https://market.android.com/details?id=md.apps.Blizzard
 
Download Winter Survival Kit app free from the Apple Store
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/winter-survival-kit/id482127435
 
NDSU Extension Service – Winter Survival tips
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/extension/apps/winter-survival-kit
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/winterstorm/winter-storm-information-family-1/stalled...-ut-safe/introduction
 
Myriad Devices – www.myriaddevices.com

NDSU Professor Named Editor of Wetlands Journal I 12/1/2011

December 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Dr. Marinus Otte, professor of biological sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., USA, has been named the new Editor-in-Chief of Wetlands, an international scientific journal. The Society of Wetland Scientists Board and Executive announced the appointment, which begins immediately and extends to 2016. Dr. Otte succeeds Dr. Darold Batzer who served as Editor-in-Chief from 2006 to 2011.

The Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) is an international organization of about 3,500 members dedicated to fostering sound wetland science, education, and management.

Wetlands is an international journal that includes all aspects of wetlands biology, ecology, hydrology, water chemistry, soil and sediment characteristics, laws, management and regulations, according to Springer, which publishes the journal six times per year. The publication includes peer-reviewed material that covers pioneering work in wetland science across many disciplines. As a global company, Springer publishes books, e-books and peer-reviewed journals in science, technical and medical (STM) publishing, with approximately 2,000 journals and 6,500 new books published annually.

“I consider the appointment as Editor-in Chief of Wetlands a great honor, and an opportunity to promote NDSU and North Dakota, and am very excited to take on this position,” said Otte. He notes that submissions to the journal have more than doubled over the past six years, with the majority of submissions by international scientists. “I am looking forward to the work and to meeting new people through this position over the coming years,” he said.

Dr. Otte is a lifetime member of the Society of Wetland Scientists and from 2002 to 2006, served as chairperson of the Society’s International Chapter. “Wetlands have been the theme of my research and teaching throughout my career; during my Ph.D. research in the Netherlands, my postdoctoral on the saltmarshes of South Carolina in the U.S., my 14 years in Ireland, and now in the Upper Midwest of the U.S.,” said Otte.

Dr. Otte has led the Wet Ecosystem Research Group at NDSU since 2006. The group trains graduate and undergraduate students in scientific research, particularly wetlands, plants, biogeochemistry, watershed ecology and metals in the environment. The group collaborates with soils scientists, geologists, environmental engineers, microbiologists, as well as with groups underpinning management of natural resources.

In addition, Dr. Otte serves as co-director of the North Dakota IdeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Metal Analysis Core, providing laboratory facilities and mentoring for researchers in undergraduate colleges throughout the state. Otte is also a member of the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium. He received his master’s and doctorate degrees from Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Dr. Otte’s research interests include wetlands, ecology, ecotoxicology, ecophysiology, and biogeochemistry.

About NDSU
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research

Lande Named Interim Director of NDSU's Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering I 11/30/2011

November 30, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Mark Lande has been named interim director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at North Dakota State University. The appointment, effective December 1, 2011, was announced by Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities & technology transfer at NDSU.

Lande is a certified public accountant with experience in municipal government, public accounting, residential real estate development and experience as a controller for public broadcasting. He joined the NDSU Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering in 2004 as finance specialist and was named assistant director for administrative and financial services in 2006. Lande’s role includes financial management of CNSE research programs, financial reporting, accounting and projections, and operational compliance standards.

“The main duties of the interim director will be the administration of CNSE’s finances and the restructuring of CNSE to enhance its potential to attract private sector funding,” said Dr. Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research.  “The technical focal points of CNSE will focus on microelectronics and combinatorial science and technology.  The term of the position is expected to be at least six months,” said Boudjouk.

NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Fargo, conducts multidisciplinary research with partners in government, industry, private and university sectors. CNSE’s scientific capabilities include flexible electronics and materials, electronics miniaturization, wireless sensors, RFID, bioactive materials, combinatorial science, and coatings technologies. Research conducted at CNSE has been featured in the Journal of Bioadhesion and Biofilm, Journal of Combinatorial Chemistry, New Electronics, Innovations Report, IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, Chip Scale Review, Wired magazine, the Financial Times and other scientific and business publications and conference proceedings.  www.ndsu.edu/cnse

Parents, Child Development Experts Use NDSU Infant Lab Research I 11/30/2011

November 30, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– On a late fall afternoon, an 8-month-old baby is the focus of attention at the Infant Cognitive Development Lab at NDSU.

The child sits on her mother’s lap facing what looks like a puppet stage. A researcher behind the stage pokes a large green block through an opening and rotates it 180-degrees, making a sound every time the corner of the block hits the table. Other researchers observe and record how the baby responds. The baby’s reaction will be part of a study looking at whether auditory cues affect how babies process what they see. Conclusions of the study may ultimately be used by early childhood specialists, pediatricians, parents and others who are interested in helping children learn, said researcher Rebecca Woods, assistant professor of human development and family science.

Woods opened NDSU’s Infant Cognitive Development lab in January 2009. Since then, more than 900 children ages 4-23 months have contributed to study results published in peer-reviewed journals. The lab, which runs on grant money Woods secures, operates about 35 hours a week. A $179,000 National Institute of Health grant through NDSU’s Center for Visual and Cognitive Neuroscience, for example, is funding studies on how infants process what they see.

The lab is staffed by manager Jena Schuler, a 2011 NDSU graduate, and 16 NDSU undergraduate and graduate students. Students help run the lab, create stimuli, recruit and test babies. Some students are fulfilling field experience requirements for their degrees, while other students are paid employees. Schuler started working in the lab as part of her child development major. “What I like about infancy research is that you have to be very creative,” said Schuler, who also has a psychology degree. “You can’t interview a baby to find out what they are thinking.”

Woods and her team have 14 studies in progress. “We have so many balls in the air at once because we don’t have a readily accessible group for testing,” she said, noting it can take as long as two years to collect data for a single study.

Students who work in the lab help recruit children for testing through public birth announcements and a commercial list of names. The North Dakota Department of Health also provides names of people Woods can contact once by letter. Parents who bring their children for testing receive information about the study, a certificate and a developmentally appropriate toy or item of NDSU clothing.

One of the researchers, graduate student Becky Lohse from Sheridan, Wyo., has held every position in the lab. As a supervisor, she follows every study, organizes shifts, explains studies to parents and makes sure the lab is running correctly. Working in the lab helped her identify her career goal of becoming a researcher and university professor. She is applying for NDSU’s doctoral program in developmental science. For others, such as Schuler, the research combines the excitement and importance of discovery with hands-on, practical experience. “I feel like I’m contributing information to the world,” she said.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Present and Publish I 11/29/2011

November 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Brent Young, assistant professor of agricultural education at NDSU, and former faculty member Angie Hodge will have their paper, “Learning Mathematics in High School Courses Beyond Mathematics: Combating the Need for Post-secondary Remediation in Mathematics,” published in the Journal of Career and Technical Education Research. The purpose of their study was to empirically test the posit that students who participated in a contextualized, mathematics-enhanced high school agricultural power and technology curriculum and aligned instructional approach would develop a deeper and more sustained understanding of selected mathematics concepts than students who participated in the traditional curriculum and instruction. This study included teachers and students from 32 high schools (16 experimental classrooms; 16 control classrooms).

Kevin Miller, assistant professor in athletic training, had a manuscript, “Plasma potassium concentration and content changes following banana ingestion in exercised males,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Athletic Training. The study investigated the anecdote that bananas could be an effective treatment for muscle cramps by increasing blood potassium concentrations. Miller observed that blood potassium concentration did not increase until 60 minutes post-ingestion and the changes were small and well within normal clinical ranges and found it is unlikely that eating bananas could be an effective treatment for exercise associated muscle cramps. Miller will also serve as chair of the National Athletic Trainers Associations Annual Meeting’s Special Topics and Peer-to-Peer Presentation Sessions. The National Athletic Trainers Association’s annual symposium is the largest gathering of certified athletic trainers in the world with approximately 10,000 attendees.

North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision announced the 2011 award winners. The NDSU Counselor Education Program was awarded the association’s Innovative Counselor Education Program Award. Bob Nielsen, professor in counselor education, was awarded the Outstanding Supervisor Award. This award is intended to honor an individual in the association who has demonstrated outstanding work as a supervisor in a university, community/mental health counseling or school setting. The North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision is a regional association of counselor educators and supervisors in 13 states.

Sarah DeJean, MS ’06, human development and family science at NDSU; Christi McGeorge, associate professor of human development and family science; and Tom Carlson, associate professor of human development and family science, will have their article, “Attitudes Toward Never-Married Single Mothers and Fathers: Does Gender Matter?” published in the Journal of Feminist Family Therapy. 

Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, presented “Emerging Research on Dairy Protein Sources and Recovery” at the 36th annual meeting of the Northland American College of Sports Medicine in Fargo in October.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, contributed a chapter titled “Developmental Psychology” in the book “Handbook of Research Methods for Studying Daily Life.”

Justin Wageman, associate professor in the School of Education, received a grant from the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction for $465,197. The grant, “The North Dakota State Assessment and Accountability Research Project 2011-2012” includes several activities such as work on assessments, consequential validity, program analysis and research assistance.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of English and education at NDSU, had “Are We Aligned Yet? Opportunities and Misgivings in Working with the Common Core Writing Standards” published in English Leadership Quarterly.

Anita Welch, assistant professor in the School of Education, presented a paper titled “A Cross-Cultural Validation of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory” at the International Conference on Education and Educational Psychology in Istanbul, Turkey. Co-authors on the paper were Mustafa Cakir (Marmara University, Turkey) and Claudette Peterson and Chris Ray, both assistant professors in the School of Education.

Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor of education at NDSU, presented her Native American boarding school research, documenting human rights violations to Native American children, at the 2011 Human Rights Network National Human Rights Conference.  Lajimodiere and Kathy Enger, former faculty member, had their article, “A Multi-Cultural Transformative Approach to Learning: Assessing Attitude Change in Doctoral Students Following an Online Diversity Course,” published in the Multicultural Education and Technology Journal. Two articles by Lajimodiere, “Ogimah Ikwe: Native Women and Their Path to Leadership” and an essay, “A Healing Journey,” were published in the journal, Wicazo Sa Review. Lajimodiere has been named the chair of the newly formed NDSU Indigenous Affinity Group.

Ann Braaten, assistant professor of apparel, design and hospitality management, and Jacqueline WayneGuite, collections manager of the Emily Reynolds Historic Costume Collection, presented “’A Woman of Considerable Influence – Dressing the Part: Kate Selby Wilder – A North Dakota Suffragist and Political Activist” at the Costume Society of America — Midwest Region Symposium. Wilder was active in civic affairs in Fargo, as well as in state and national affairs, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the North Dakota League of Women Voters from around 1900 to 1946. She was elected to the Fargo City Commission in 1919 and was named police commissioner for two years.

WooMi Phillips, assistant professor in apparel, design and hospitality management, received the Delta Kappa Gamma North Dakota Beta Chapter’s first Early Educator Award. This is part of the Teachers Helping Another Teach program, which encourages Delta Kappa Gamma members and chapters to be creative in support of early-career educators. To qualify for this award, candidates must have zero to five years of teaching experience. 

Joe Deutsch, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, had three publications printed or accepted for publication with his graduate students –“Overload/Underload Training: A Look at Weighted Ball Throwing,” to be published in the Missouri Journal of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; “The Effects of Technology in the Elementary Physical Education Classroom,” accepted into the Asian Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; “Making a Case for Early Specialization in Youth Sports,” accepted into the Journal of Youth Sports. Deutsch also will present two sessions at the central district American Alliance for Health, Physical Education Recreation and Dance conference – “Helping Children with ADHD Succeed in the Physical Education Classroom” and “Making a Case for Early Sports Specialization in Youth Sports.”

WooMi Phillips, assistant professor in apparel, design and hospitality management; Sunhee Seo, Ewah Woman’s University, Korea; and two graduate students, Junghee Jang, Ewah Woman’s University, Korea; and Kawon Kim, Ewah Woman’s University, Korea; had a manuscript titled “The Effects of Acculturation and Uncertainty Avoidance on Foreign Resident Choice for Korean Foods" accepted for publication in the International Journal of Hospitality Management.

Marissa Lindback, master’s student in health, nutrition and exercise sciences; Jay Albrecht, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences; and Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, will have their article, "What Sport Coaches Should Know About Concussions," published in the Journal of Youth Sports.

Social Science Conference Seeks Paper Proposals I 11/28/2011

November 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The Western Social Science Association is calling for paper and session proposals for its 54th annual conference April 11-14, 2012, in Houston. The program coordinator for the conference is Tom Isern, University Distinguished Professor of history at NDSU, who is the organization’s president-elect.

Isern said he is responsible for putting together more than 600 presentations for the three-day conference, and he invites colleagues to consider submitting proposals.

“The association is a house with many rooms. It has sections of the program devoted not only to traditional social science fields such as sociology and political science, but also to a variety of subject specializations like women's studies, Canadian studies, chronic disease and disability, and many others,” said Isern. “The variety of disciplines and subjects addressed means that the meeting is an opportunity not only for people in traditional social science disciplines but also the humanities, the applied human sciences and other areas. I encourage scholars to have a look at the list of sections of the association and see if one of them might suit their interests.”

For the call for papers and information on registration, membership and section coordinators, visit http://wssa.asu.edu

NDSU Emergency Management Assistant Professor Teaches Pilot Course I 11/28/2011

November 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Carol Cwiak, assistant professor of emergency management at NDSU, taught the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s pilot offering of “Integrating Emergency Management Into Your Institution.” The program is designed to increase emergency management course and degree offerings in minority serving institutions. Cwiak served as a subject matter expert by the agency in the course development stage and helped craft and review final course materials.

The pilot offering was attended by faculty and administrators from Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The Federal Emergency Management Agency developed the course to help meet its mission to increase diversity in the field of emergency management. In the past year, Cwiak also participated in a FEMA-sponsored conference focused on emergency management program development for tribal colleges.

Cwiak is the executive director of the Emergency Management Higher Education Consortium and is heavily engaged in the advancement of emergency management higher education directives. Cwiak frequently presents on topics regarding emergency management higher education and has provided program start-up assistance to many new academic programs at the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s request.

Women in Research Meeting Scheduled for Dec. 1 at NDSU I 11/21/2011

November 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — A Women in Research meeting titled “How to join the STEM Movement and/or Commercialize Your Research” is scheduled for Dec. 1 from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Meadow Lark room. Lunch will be served.

A three-person panel will give attendees tools to help NDSU and the state of North Dakota attract more students to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers. Lisa Gulland-Nelson, STEM coordinator for the Greater Fargo Moorhead Economic Development Corp., will present a snapshot of efforts in North Dakota to encourage more students and professionals to excel in STEM fields. She’ll also have a video montage underscoring rapid changes in society and how STEM helps address those knowledge gaps.

Mary Batcheller, director of business development at the Greater Fargo Moorhead Economic Development Corp., and Kathy Coyle, from USDA Rural Development, will explain funding options available for individuals to create their own company.

Institute Seeks Fellowship Applicants I 11/21/2011

November 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute invites 2012 Graduate Research Fellowship program applications.

NDSU and University of North Dakota graduate students, who conduct or plan research in water resources, can apply for fellowships of varying duration, ranging from three months to one year. Typically, fellowship awards range from $800 to $1,000 per month for master’s degree students and $1,000 to $1,400 per month for doctoral students. The fellowship funds must be applied between March 1, 2012, and Feb. 28, 2013. A technical completion report co-written by the fellow and the adviser is expected of each fellowship research project.

Research proposed for fellowship support should relate to water resources issues in the state or region. Regional, state or local collaborations or co-funding will strengthen an application. Fellowships have a matching requirement of two non-federal dollars to one federal dollar. At the time of applying, applicants should have a plan of study filed and/or a thesis research topic selected. Applications need to be prepared in consultation with advisers. The applications should be co-signed by the applicants’ advisers. Applications from students and advisers who have not met the reporting requirements of their previous fellowship projects will not be considered for funding.

General criteria used for proposal evaluation include scientific merit, originality, research related to state or region, and extent of regional, state or local collaboration and/or co-funding. A panel of state water resources professionals will review the proposals.

Award announcement will be made by early January, subject to the appropriation of funds for the fiscal year 2012 program by the federal government. For more information on the program and guidelines for preparation of applications, visit www.ndsu.edu/wrri.

Applications are due by 5 p.m., Dec. 2. Submit original and four hard copies of applications to Linda Charlton, North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute, Family Life Center (FLC 320), NDSU Dept 2030, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108-6050 and an electronic copy in Word format to g.padmanabhan@ndsu.edu.

For additional information, contact G. Padmanabhan, professor of civil engineering, at g.padmanabhan@ndsu.edu or Linda Charlton, ITS tech coordinator, at linda.charlton@ndsu.edu.

NDSU Students and Faculty Attend Regional Sociological Conference I 11/21/2011

November 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Patty Corwin, senior lecturer of sociology, won the Excellence in Service Award at the Great Plains Sociological Association meeting held Oct. 13-14 in Spearfish, S.D. Also, several sociology students and faculty presented papers at the conference.

Papers and presenters included:

  • "Impacts of 'Boom-Bust' Cycles on Natural Resource-Dependent Communities: Lessons Learned from a Review of the Research Literature" – Audrey Putz, Alex Finken and Gary Goreham
  • "Fargo-Moorhead Red River Diversion Plan" – Andrew Kubas
  • "Concerns of the North Dakota Bakken Oil Counties" – Emily McCallum, Shelby Bohnenkamp, Alex Finken, Audrey Putz and Gary Goreham
  • "Intergenerational Farmland Transfer in North Dakota" – Shelby Bohnenkamp
  • "Understanding Child Work in the 21st Century" – Courage C. Mudzongo

International Grade 7-12 Students Present Wastewater Recycling Research in NDSU Conference I 11/16/2011

November 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Thirty middle school and high school students from four countries will meet by teleconference at North Dakota State University on Saturday, Nov. 19, to present research from a six-month wastewater recycling project.

The International WateRediscover Conference will be 7:30 a.m.-10 a.m. on Nov. 19 in E. Morrow Lebedeff (EML) 183 at NDSU. Five teams from Bangladesh, India, Uganda and the United States will each give 15-minute presentations on projects where they designed, fabricated and tested wastewater recycling units following the engineering design process.

“The primary objective of WateRediscover is to entice our younger generation to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education,” said Achintya Bezbaruah, assistant professor of civil engineering at NDSU and WateRediscover project director. “This will also give our students in the U.S. the opportunity to interact with their peers from across the globe.”

A group of ninth and 10th graders from the West Fargo Public Schools will represent the U.S. They will participate in the teleconference at NDSU, while the other teams will participate from their hometowns.

NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani will inaugurate the event by teleconference. Other speakers include David Flowers, superintendent of the West Fargo School District, and Eakalak Khan, chair of the civil engineering department at NDSU. Jay Garland, director of the microbiological and chemical exposure assessment research division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will join by telephone from Cincinnati.

Bezbaruah has worked with West Fargo students on water recycling projects in the past, but expanded it to an international scale this year. International graduate students at NDSU helped him propose the project to schools in their home countries. Bezbaruah hopes to expand the program to more countries next year.

NDSU will stream the teleconference live at http://134.129.203.38/tcs. It will be the first link on that day and will not require a password.

To reserve a seat at the teleconference, contact Achintya Bezbaruah at a.bezbaruah@ndsu.edu or 231-7461. Students in grades 6-12 are especially encouraged to attend.

ND EPSCoR Provides New Faculty Start-Up Awards I 11/15/2011

November 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Five NDSU departments received New Faculty Start-Up awards funded through North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR). A total of $647,000 over two years will be provided in supplemental New Faculty Start-Up funds to new hires in the biological sciences, geosciences, mathematics, pharmaceutical sciences and psychology departments.

The New Faculty Start-Up program’s major goal is to staff North Dakota’s research-intensive universities with new faculty who will be nationally competitive for grants from federal agency research programs in science, engineering and mathematics. “These funds give chairs of departments the means to provide start-up packages that allow new faculty to equip and staff their laboratories,” said Philip Boudjouk, co-chair of ND EPSCoR and vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer.

ND EPSCoR is a federally and state-funded program designed to help university researchers compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in the sciences, engineering and mathematics. For more information, visit www.ndepscor.nodak.edu or direct questions to David R. Givers, ND EPSCoR, co-project director, at 1-7516 or david.givers@ndsu.edu.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Researchers to Publish Paper I 11/14/2011

November 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Shuang Zhou, doctoral student of pharmaceutical sciences in Wu’s lab, co-wrote the article, "High glucose promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via the induction of EGF expression and transactivation of EGFR,” which will be published by PLoS ONE.

According to the authors, multiple lines of evidence suggest that a large portion of pancreatic cancer patients suffer from either hyperglycemia or diabetes, both of which are characterized by high blood glucose level. However, the underlying biological mechanism of this phenomenon is largely unknown. The authors demonstrated that the proliferative ability of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and Panc-1, was upregulated by high glucose in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the promoting effect of high glucose levels on epidermal growth factor (EGF) transcription and secretion, but not its receptors in these pancreatic cancer cell lines, was detected by using an epidermal growth factor-neutralizing antibody and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation is induced by high glucose levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners in pancreatic cancer cells in the presence of the epidermal growth factor-neutralizing antibody. These results suggest that high glucose promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via the induction of epidermal growth factor expression and transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

“Our findings may provide new insight on the links between high glucose level and pancreatic cancer in terms of the molecular mechanism and reveal a novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer patients who simultaneously suffer from either diabetes or hyperglycemia,” senior author Wu said. The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. “We have established a productive collaboration with the Ma lab in finding cancer therapeutics and elucidating the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal malignancies,” Wu said.

PLoS ONE journal features reports of original research from all disciplines within science and medicine. (www.plosone.org). During the past four years, Wu has published five papers in the journal.

NDSU and COMSATS Institute to Develop Solar Water Heating System for Harsh Climates I 11/4/2011

November 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Researchers from North Dakota State University, Fargo, and COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan, are working together to design a solar water heating system for harsh climates.

The project between the two universities involves developing an eco-friendly heating and cooling system for citizens in the underdeveloped region of Gilgit-Baltistan in northern Pakistan, where low winter temperatures and wind chill prevent using existing solar energy technology.

Sumathy Krishnan, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and Samee U. Khan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, are leading the NDSU group, while Nasrullah Khan Kalair and Waqar H. Bokhari are leading the effort for COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. Together, they are working to harness solar energy efficiently, even in harsh subfreezing conditions, using carbon dioxide as its working fluid and a direct-expansion heat pump to ensure continuous and efficient operation. One of the project’s goals is to create an affordable prototype costing less than $300 that will be ready for field tests in Gilgit-Baltistan over the next two winters.

The collaboration is part of a larger Pakistan-U.S. Science and Technology Cooperation Program that awarded NDSU and COMSAT research teams a two-year grant for the project. The Pakistan-U.S. Science and Technology Cooperation Program was established in 2005 to increase scientific collaboration between researchers of both countries for mutually beneficial, practical and applicable projects. It was developed by the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan, and Ministry of Science and Technology of the Government of Pakistan. In the U.S., the project is managed by the National Academies.

According to Kelly Robbins, manager of the Pakistan-U.S. Science and Technology program at the National Academies, this project was one of 25 selected out of 270 proposals for the competitive program, which is jointly funded by the governments of both countries.

“Our Pakistani and U.S. review panels and program sponsors noted that the project will not only help build Pakistani research capabilities but also develop a product that would directly benefit people living in Gilgit-Baltistan,” Robbins said. “The new system could also be deployed in other countries with harsh winters, including the northern United States, and if the project is successful, it could result in a commercializable product that could create new opportunities for manufacturers and installers in both countries.”

For more information on the hybrid solar water heating system joint project, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/dsc/pakistan/PGA_058762
 
For more information about the program, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/dsc/pakistan/index.htm
  
COMSATS Institute of Information Technology was established in 1999 and since has expanded from 350 students to more than 17,000 with seven campuses throughout Pakistan.
 
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the top 108 public and private universities in the U.S. in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research

NDSU Science Café to Cover DNA’s Role in Bringing Justice I 10/31/2011

October 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Stuart J. Haring, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at NDSU, will present “DNA Profiling: Providing Justice One Molecule at a Time” Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 7 p.m. in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson, 101 N. Broadway, as part of the Science Café series.

The presentation will target the one thing people take with them every day and leave almost everywhere they go – deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

The biological molecule DNA is contained within each cell of the human body. Although everyone’s DNA makeup is very similar, there are many regions of DNA that are unique to each individual. Much like gender, height, weight, hair/eye color and identifying marks, the variable DNA regions also can be used as unique personal identifiers.

“Although DNA analysis has been around for more than 25 years, it is only recently, as more rigor has been established for evidence collection and handling and more reliable and efficient techniques have been developed, that DNA analysis is becoming the accepted choice to establish identity ‘beyond a reasonable doubt,’ ” Haring said. “Whether in court cases or natural disasters, DNA is often becoming the star witness in identity determination, especially when video, eyewitnesses and fingerprints are not available,” he said.

This discussion will address exactly how DNA is analyzed and how the information can be used to convict or exonerate, identify missing persons and victims of disasters, and confirm or deny paternity.  The presentation is free and open to the public. Attendees must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information, contact Keri Drinka at keri.drinka@ndsu.edu or 231-6131.

Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Researchers to Publish Paper I 10/28/2011

October 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "Anti-cancer activities of tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate in breast cancer patients under radiotherapy,” which will be published by Current Molecular Medicine.

In the study, they tested the hypothesis that administration of epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a polyphenol present in abundance in widely consumed tea, inhibits cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in breast cancer patients. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate in 400 mg capsules was orally administered three times daily to breast cancer patients undergoing treatment by radiotherapy. Parameters related to cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis were analyzed while blood samples were collected at different time points to determine efficacy of the treatment.

Compared to patients who received radiotherapy alone, those given radiotherapy plus epigallocatechin-3-gallate for an extended time period (two to eight weeks) showed significantly lower serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and reduced activation of metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase-2.

“This is the first study to use EGCG in human breast cancer patients. Our results provide hitherto unreported evidence that EGCG potentiated efficacy of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, and raise the possibility that this tea polyphenol has potential to be a therapeutic adjuvant against human metastatic breast cancer,” Wu said. They collaborated with Guoying Zhang’s lab from Yantai University, China.

Current Molecular Medicineis an interdisciplinary journal that provides current and comprehensive reviews and original research articles on fundamental molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, the development of molecular-diagnosis and/or novel approaches to rational treatment. Its current impact factor is 5.21, ranking 12th of 106 medicine, research and experimental journals www.benthamscience.com/cmm/index.htm

NDSU Communication Researchers Present at Conference I 10/28/2011

October 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Amy O'Connor, associate professor at NDSU and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication, and graduate student Alicia E. Phillips are scheduled to give a presentation at the upcoming Corporate Social Responsibility in Communication conference in Amsterdam.

O’Connor and Phillips presented “Consumption Conundrum: Millennials perceptions of pink ribbons” during the conference Oct. 26-28.

The research presentation is an extension of Phillips’ master’s degree thesis project, which focuses on how Millennials perceive the pink ribbon products associated with finding a cure for breast cancer. O'Connor is Phillip’s adviser.

NDSU Faculty and Students Present at Feminism and Rhetoric Conference I 10/28/2011

October 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — English department members Rebecca Hayes, Heather Steinmann, Kelly Cameron, Kelly Sassi and Amy Rupiper Taggart presented at the National Feminism(s) and Rhetoric(s) Conference, held Oct. 12-15 in Mankato, Minn. The theme of the conference was “Feminist Challenges or Feminist Rhetorics? Locations, Scholarship, and Discourse.”

Cameron, a former master’s degree student and current lecturer in English, presented "An Irish Mother India: Margaret Cousins' Rhetoric of Witnessing in ‘We Two Together.’ " The paper suggested Margaret Cousins, an Irish woman working in India, used a rhetoric of witnessing, acting as a medium to advance Indian women's rights.

Hayes, a current master’s degree student in English, presented on her archival research on Aloha Eagles letters. Eagles was a North Dakota legislator who worked on a bill that would have legalized abortion, and Hayes suggests Eagles and her correspondents used the rhetorics of identity to navigate the socially sensitive topic of abortion. Her presentation was titled "Who Are You and I…?; Rhetoric of Identity in the Aloha Eagles Letters."

Rupiper Taggart, associate professor of English, presented "The Axis of Agency and Social Control: Jessie Fauset's Rhetorical Space and the Rhetoric of Respectability," which examines a Harlem Renaissance literary figure and Progressive era leader from a rhetorical perspective. It suggests she participated in both highlighting images of a rising African American middle class and in a rhetoric of respectable behavior rooted in the Baptist Women's Convention, all with the goal of race "uplift."

Sassi presented her work on S. Alice Callahan's novel “Wynema.” The presentation, titled "She Wrote It, BUT . . . It's 'Assimilationist Dogma': Indigenous Feminist Spatial Rhetoric in the First Novel by a Native American Woman," suggests rather than being assimilationist, “Wynema” uses indigenous rhetorics of dual voicing, among other techniques, to reach white audiences.

Heather Steinmann, a doctoral student, joined a panel on "Rhetoric and Fictions: Interpretation and Collaboration," and she presented her work "Victimization in Dorothy Allison's ‘Bastard out of Carolina’: Turning the Inside out." In this presentation, Steinmann suggests Allison uses fictional writing techniques to expose readers to the experience of oppression that cannot be fully realized in purely academic writing.

NDSU Develops Innovative Laser-Enabled Electronic Packaging Technology I 10/22/2011

October 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Small. Fast. Precise. A new electronics manufacturing technology developed at North Dakota State University, Fargo, eliminates challenges facing conventional packaging techniques and shows promise to significantly reduce the size and unit cost of microelectronic devices. The technology, called Laser-Enabled Advanced Packaging (LEAP™), has the potential to enable high-volume handling, placement and interconnection of microelectronic components smaller than ever before possible.

LEAP™ is a comprehensive wafer-to-product electronic packaging technology for high-throughput, low-cost, contactless assembly of ultrathin semiconductor chips onto rigid and flexible substrates. The technology has been under development by the Advanced Electronics Packaging research group at the North Dakota State University Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), Fargo, N. D., since 2008.

Recently the NDSU researchers successfully implemented the LEAP™ technology to fabricate the first-ever functional electronic device with a laser-assembled, ultra-thin silicon chip embedded in a flexible substrate. The research group is led by Dr. Val Marinov, associate professor of manufacturing engineering; and includes Dr. Orven Swenson, associate professor of physics at NDSU; Ross Miller, research engineer apprentice; and CNSE research staff, graduate students and undergraduate research assistants.

A key part of LEAP™ is the patent-pending process, Thermo-Mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT™). This process selectively and rapidly places ultra-thin (<50 µm) semiconductor chips at specific locations and orientations with high precision.  According to the researchers, no other high-volume techniques currently exist for the selective placement of such ultra-thin, flexible components essential to fabricate electronic devices on flexible substrates, with various types of active and passive embedded components.

“The LEAP™ technology and tmSLADT™ process are important because they potentially enable a new class of inexpensive electronic devices by the high-volume placement and interconnection of various types of ultra-thin, fine pitch, active and passive circuit components,” said Aaron Reinholz, associate director for electronics technology at NDSU CNSE. “These types of components are especially of interest for flex substrate electronics, as they allow devices to bend, roll and be manipulated into complex geometries.”

Reinholz said application of the LEAP™ technology offers a new paradigm for numerous types of flexible and potentially disposable microelectronic devices, such as garment-integrated RFID tags, intelligent sensors platforms, and self-adapting conformal antennas. He added that this technology has strong potential in the near future outside of defense applications to reduce the unit cost of high volume single-chip devices such as RFID tags, smart cards, chip-and-pin bank cards and “smart” bank notes. According to CNSE researchers, the tmSLADT™ process also has potential value in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication or other micro-assembly applications.

The LEAP™ technology is outlined in “Laser-Enabled Advanced Packaging of Ultrathin Bare Dice in Flexible Substrates” which has been accepted for publication by IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, manuscript TCPMT-2011-105. Another manuscript, “Noncontact Selective Laser-Assisted Placement of Thinned Semiconductor Dice,” is currently under peer review.

This material is based on research sponsored by the Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) under agreement number H94003-11-2-1102. This press release does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the Government and no official endorsement should be inferred.

For more information, contact Aaron Reinholz at aaron.reinholz@ndsu.edu

Dr. Stuart G. Croll Selected for Mattiello Lecture Award at Upcoming American Coatings Conference I 10/19/2011

October 19, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – The American Coatings Association (ACA) announced that Dr. Stuart G. Croll, chair of the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at North Dakota State University, Fargo, will deliver the Mattiello Memorial Lecture at its American Coatings Conference, May 7-9, 2012, in Indianapolis, Ind., in conjunction with the American Coatings Show, May 8-10. The Joseph J. Mattiello Lecture Award is designed to recognize an individual who has made outstanding contributions to science, technology, and/or engineering related to the coatings industry.

Dr. Croll joined the faculty of the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at North Dakota State University in 2000, becoming the Chair of the department in 2006.  Prior to joining North Dakota State University, Dr. Croll worked in R&D at Millennium Inorganic Chemicals, concerned with many of the aspects of titanium dioxide pigments.

As a faculty member at NDSU, he teaches courses on coatings materials science including film formation, color and appearance, coating and polymer characterization, and polymer physical properties. His research interests include the durability of polymers and coatings, adhesion, corrosion protection, bio-based materials, and art conservation.

Dr. Croll earned a degree in physics from the University of London (UK), and completed a doctorate degree in polymer physics at the University of Leeds (UK). He worked in England, and later moved to the Division of Building Research in the National Research Council Canada, where he first worked on coatings. After periods in the construction chemicals and telecommunication cable industries, he moved into the coatings industry with The Sherwin-Williams Company, where he worked on a wide range of R&D and troubleshooting projects, including those involving film formation, application rheology, weathering durability, adhesion, dispersion stability, and polymer characterization.

Dr. Croll is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, and the Institute of Physics (in the UK). He is a member of the editorial review board of Progress in Organic Coatings and ACA’s Journal of Coatings Technology and Research. Dr. Croll has published articles in the coatings, polymers, mechanics, and corrosion literature, has presented papers at many meetings and symposia, and has been an instructor in short courses given to a variety of audiences.

The leading scientific event for the coatings industry, the American Coatings Conference provides a world-class, high-level technical and research forum, rallying leading industry experts from coatings manufacturers, their suppliers, universities, and government partners across the nation and beyond.  More than 6,100 participants from 61 countries attended the previous conference in 2010.
The American Coatings Association (ACA), co-host of the American Coatings Conference and Show, is a voluntary, nonprofit trade association working to advance the needs of the paint and coatings industry and the professionals who work in it.

North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects.  www.ndsu.edu/research

NDSU Graduate Student Researcher Receives Outstanding Presentation Award I 10/19/2011

October 19, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – A group of students, faculty and staff from the Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences at NDSU recently attended the American Society for Microbiology North Central Branch’s annual meeting. NDSU graduate student Ebot Tabe won the Outstanding Presentation award for his talk, “A Cryptosporidium parvum rhomboid protease (CpROM) colocalizes with a thrombospondin related adhesive protein (TRAP-C1) during invasion of host cells.” Tabe is a student in John McEvoy’s lab.

In addition, Tabe and graduate student Priyankar Samanta, research specialist and teacher Anu­radha Vegi, and NDSU associate professor Birgit Pruess presented their research findings. Dr. Pruess was elected president of the society’s North Central Branch. Penelope Gibbs, NDSU associate professor, will serve as vice president and Shelley Horne, NDSU research specialist, will serve as treasurer. NDSU will host the branch’s meeting in October 2012.

NDSU Prof Presents at Literature Conference I 10/19/2011

October 19, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Linda Helstern, associate professor of English at NDSU, presented a paper on the work of contemporary Blackfeet novelist Stephen Graham Jones at the 46th annual conference of the Western Literature Association in Missoula, Mont., Oct. 5-8.

The conference brings together scholars from across Europe, Canada and the United States to focus on the literature and culture of the trans-Mississippi West.

Helstern’s paper, titled “ ‘Not the Same Elk’: The Return of Native Agency in Stephen Graham Jones’ Ledfeather,” considers how this highly experimental text, a rewriting of the history of the Blackfeet starvation winter of 1883-84, reinforces key principles of Native thought through the play of language and story. It is part of an ongoing research project on historiography and Native American literature.

Joshua T. Anderson, a 2011 NDSU English graduate, also presented at the conference. Winner of the 2011-12 Western American Literature Editorial Fellowship at Utah State University, Anderson is pursuing his master’s degree in American studies.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish and Present I 10/17/2011

October 17, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Kevin Miller, assistant professor of athletic training at NDSU, had his manuscript, “Initial electrical stimulation frequency’s effect on cramp threshold frequency and force,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Athletic Training. The study examines the validity of an electrical stimulation cramp model when different starting frequencies were used to induce muscle cramps in the foot.

The manuscript, “Correction equations to adjust self-reported height and weight for obesity estimates among college students,” was published in Research Quarterly in Exercise Science. The co-authors are Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU; and Arupendra Mozumdar, adjunct faculty member of health, nutrition and exercise sciences and research associate for the Tata Institute of Social Science, Mumbai, Mozumdar.

Amber Bach-Gorman, doctoral student in counselor education at NDSU, has been awarded an Association of Counselor Education and Supervision 2011 Emerging Leadership scholarship. The award provides the opportunity to network with both professional and research leaders in the field of counselor education, as well as education on the leadership opportunities within the association and overall profession. Bach-Gorman also will present at the national meeting with counseling faculty: Jill Nelson, associate professor; Brenda Hall, associate professor; and Kim Halbur, associate dean of Diversity Affairs, Georgia Health Sciences University. Their presentation is titled “Engaging Site Supervisors in Clinical Supervision Training: Strategies for Involving and Preparing Practitioners.”

Julie Garden-Robinson, associate professor at NDSU and Extension food and nutrition specialist for health, nutrition and exercise sciences, presented “Nourish Your Bones and Joints” at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences in Albuquerque, N.M. She and Stacy Halvorson, Extension associate, also presented “Now Serving: Beans!” at the Showcase of Excellence poster session.

Anita Welch, assistant professor of education at NDSU, received the Lucile Cornetet Professional Development Award through the Delta Kappa Gamma Educational Foundation.

Stacy Duffield, associate professor of education, was nominated by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education to serve as a Board of Examiners member for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

WooMi Phillips, assistant professor of apparel, design, and hospitality management at NDSU; Kara Wolfe, associate professor and hospitality leadership director of Bradley University; Nancy Hodur, assistant research professor; and F. Larry Leistritz, professor from the Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, had their "Tourist word-of-mouth and revisit intentions to rural tourism destinations: a case of North Dakota, USA” accepted for publication in International Journal of Tourism Research.

Amanda Haire, MS ’10, and Christi McGeorge, associate professor of human development and family sciences at NDSU, had their article, “Negative Perceptions of Never-Married Custodial Single Mothers and Fathers: Applications of a Gender Analysis for Family Therapists,” accepted for publication in the 2012 Journal of Feminist Family Therapy. Haire and McGeorge also presented a poster presentation at the 2011 American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy Annual Conference in Fort Worth, Texas, titled “Negative Perceptions of Single Mothers and Fathers.”

Tom Stone Carlson and Christi McGeorge, associate professors of human development and family science at NDSU, presented a two-hour workshop at the 2011 American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy Annual Conference in Fort Worth, Texas. The workshop focused on their research on training family therapy students to provide competent therapy to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender clients. Carlson, McGeorge and Russell Toomey, collaborator from Arizona State University, also presented “Examining the Validity of the Affirmative Training Inventory.”

Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU; John Schuna Jr., a doctoral student; and Arupendra Mozumdar, adjunct professor of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, had their manuscript, “Semester long changes in sleep duration for college students,” published in College Student Journal.

New Research Shows People With a “Sweet Tooth” Have Sweeter Dispositions I 10/17/2011

October 17, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – If you’re dealing with a crabby co-worker or sour-faced friend, perhaps some new research can help.  It sheds light on the question:  Can eating sweets make you—well—sweet? A new study by researchers at North Dakota State University, Fargo, Gettysburg College and Saint Xavier University suggests people with a “sweet tooth” have sweeter dispositions. The research was conducted by Dr. Brian Meier, associate professor of psychology at Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pa.; Dr. Michael D. Robinson, NDSU professor of psychology; Dr. Sara Moeller, assistant professor at Saint Xavier University, Chicago, Ill.; and Miles Riemer-Peltz of Gettysburg College.

The paper, “Sweet Taste Preferences and Experiences Predict Pro-Social Inferences, Personalities, and Behaviors,” is being published by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2011-19191-001/

According to Meier, “Taste is something we experience every day. Our research examined whether metaphors that link taste preferences with pro-social experiences (e.g., “she’s a sweetheart”) can be used to shed light on actual personality traits and behavior.”

The research included a series of five studies. In one study, the authors found participants who ate a sweet food (a specific brand of chocolate), versus a non-sweet food (a cracker), or no food, were more likely to volunteer to help another person in need. The authors also found in another study that people believe that a person who likes sweet foods like candy or chocolate cake (compared to foods from the other four taste types) is also more agreeable or helpful, but not more extroverted or neurotic.

“It is striking that helpful and friendly people are considered ‘sweet’ because taste would seem to have little in common with personality or behavior. Yet, recent psychological theories of embodied metaphor led us to hypothesize that seemingly innocuous metaphors can be used to derive novel insights about personality and behavior,” said Dr. Meier. “Importantly, our taste studies controlled for positive mood so the effects we found are not due to the happy or rewarding feeling one may have after eating a sweet food.”

According to Dr. Robinson, “Our results suggest there is a real link between sweet tastes and pro-social behavior. Such findings reveal that metaphors can lead to unique and provocative predictions about people's behaviors and personality traits.”

The authors also showed that people who like sweet foods, versus individuals who do not, were higher in the personality trait of agreeableness and were more likely to volunteer to help clean up their city after it experienced a major flood. In other words, the authors demonstrated people can predict how helpful or nice someone is, based on the extent to which whether he or she prefers eating sweet foods. Preferences for the other four taste types were not predictive of the pro-social trait of agreeableness.

The researchers say that taste metaphors may have different consequences for interpersonal functioning in other cultures.  “Although we suggest our results are likely to be found in other cultures, that may not always be the case across all cultures,” said Dr. Meier, who suggests that cross-cultural research of the same type would be informative.

NDSU English Associate Professor Publishes Essay I 10/17/2011

October 17, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Gary Totten, English associate professor at NDSU, recently had his essay, “Geographies of Race and Mobility in Carl Rowan’s South of Freedom,” published in the new anthology, “Riding/Writing Across Borders in North American Travelogues and Fiction,” edited by Waldemar Zacharasiewicz and published by the Austrian Academy of Sciences Press.

In the essay, Totten examines Rowan’s travel narrative, “South of Freedom,” an account of his trip through the U.S. South in 1951 as an African American journalist for the Minneapolis Morning Tribune, and discusses how U.S. attitudes about race affected both his travel experiences and the resulting travel narrative.

NDSU Researchers to Present at Geological Society of America Meeting I 10/10/2011

October 10, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – NDSU students and faculty are presenting their research at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America Oct. 9-12 at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Alexander Smith, a student in the geosciences graduate program, will present on paleoclimatology and paleoceanography on the Friis Hills in Antarctica.

Kristin Alstadt, who recently graduated with a master’s degree in mechanical engineering, will present on advances in geochemistry. She will specifically speak about studies performed on molecular interactions in oil shale at NDSU.

Jason Triplett, a mechanical engineering doctoral student, will focus his presentation on mineralogy and environmental geoscience. Triplett will present on a type of rock and/or soil that has a potential for health concerns in North Dakota.

Allan Ashworth, Distinguished Professor of geosciences, will present on the Moorhead Low Water Phase in the Fargo-Moorhead area and its connection with the Lake Agassiz basin in North Dakota.

Kenneth Lepper, associate professor of geosciences, will present on quartenary geology. He will speak about testing done on Lake Agassiz’s shoreline to understand the connection between lake level changes and climate change.

Brian Slator, professor of computer science, will present on eGEO software, which allows students to travel in a fictional planet to complete tasks on environmental issues.

Approximately 6,000 scientists are expected to attend the meeting. The meeting will host a variety of sessions, courses, workshops and events. For information on other speakers and exhibits visit, www.geosociety.org/meetings/2011

NDSU Management Associate Professor to Receive Best Paper Award I 10/4/2011

October 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Chanchai Tangpong, associate professor of management at NDSU, co-wrote a paper that has been selected for the Best Theoretical/Empirical Paper Award Winner for the 2011 Decision Sciences Institute Conference to be held in Boston Nov. 19-22.

The paper, “Synergistic Use of Experiment and Survey for Cross-Level Behavioral OM Research,” was written with Kuo-Ting Hung at Suffolk University. It identifies cross-level fallacies as a major problem in behavioral research on operations and supply chains. To prevent such fallacies, Tangpong and Hung creatively developed a methodological approach based on a synergistic use of experiment and survey research methods.

The Best Theoretical/Empirical Paper Award has been received previously by scholars from major research institutions such as Carnegie-Mellon University, Ohio State University and University of Minnesota. 

NDSU Physics Professor Receives Heartland Pride Award I 10/4/2011

October 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Dr. Alexander Wagner, associate professor of physics at NDSU, has received the Heartland Pride Award from the Fargo-Moorhead Convention & Visitors Bureau at its annual meeting on Sept. 27. Wagner organized the Discrete Simulation of Fluid Dynamics (DSFD) 20th International Conference held in Fargo on Aug. 8-12, with participants from more than 14 countries.

According to those attending the international conference, Fargo compared favorably to Rome and Beijing, the previous conference sites. The international conference included leaders in the fields of physics, mathematics and engineering. Wagner said international attendees appreciated the scientific discussion, as well as the Fargo setting.

“The location of Barry Hall was wonderful and an Oxford Don compared it favorably to a new Mathematics building at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. Participants loved the downtown location which they explored with bicycles we rented from Great Northern Cycles,” said Wagner.

Conference attendees also enjoyed the MSUM Regional Science Center at Buffalo River State Park in Minnesota for an event that included tipis provided by NDSU Professor Malcolm Butler. They served as a backdrop for a Native American flute performance by noted musician Keith Bear, and a presentation on the Dakota Prison Letters by NDSU’s Clifford Canku.

By the end of the conference, a participant from France told Wagner, “You know, at the beginning of the conference I told you that I liked your town. Now at the end I have to tell you that I REALLY like it. It has such a wonderful relaxing atmosphere to it.”

In his acceptance speech for the Heartland Pride Award, Wagner told the audience that others had different perceptions of Fargo when he came to NDSU.

“When I moved to Fargo nine years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, my American friends told me: ‘Why do you want to go there? We came to visit you in Scotland, but I don't think we would ever want to go there!’ And, except for family, there have been no visitors from the U.S. From Europeans, however, the reaction was quite different.  A typical reaction would be ‘Fargo, that sounds exciting!’ North Dakota is viewed as one of the last frontiers in the U.S. I continue to marvel at this most precious of resources that is so abundant in North Dakota: space.” Wagner also encouraged those attending the Convention & Visitors Bureau annual meeting to “embrace the more relaxed and friendly atmosphere that makes the Fargo Moorhead area so different.”

A featured speaker at the event noted Wagner’s observations in his blog at http://billgeist.typepad.com/blog/2011/09/loving-where-you-live.html

The Fargo-Moorhead Convention & Visitors Bureau awarded another NDSU professor the Heartland Pride Award in 2006. Dr. Jeffrey Clark received the award as conference organizer for bringing an international conference for computer applications and quantitative methods in archaeology to Fargo.

NDSU ‘Gear Up for Grants’ Seminar Scheduled I 10/4/2011

October 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – The Office of Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer at NDSU has scheduled the first “Gear Up for Grants” seminar of the academic year for Tuesday, Oct. 11, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union Arikara room.

Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU, will present “Building a Nationally Competitive Research Program at NDSU.”

Boudjouk presents a seminar annually geared to newer faculty who are initiating independent research careers. He will offer advice on obtaining grants and building a research career based on his experience as a chemistry researcher and as a research administrator.  

NDSU faculty, staff and students are welcome to attend.

NDSU Associate Professor Gives Keynote Address in Switzerland I 10/4/2011

October 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Kimberly Vonnahme, associate professor of animal sciences, gave the keynote address at the second COST Action Workshop on Aug. 23 at the Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Research Station in Posieux, Switzerland.

Her presentation was titled “How the maternal environment sets the stage for postnatal growth and development.” Participants were from Ireland, Switzerland, France, Italy, Belgium, Germany, Spain and Portugal.

"The Science of Art" Scheduled Oct. 4 at North Dakota State University I 10/3/2011

October 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – What do art and science have in common? Plenty. Conservation science draws on analytical techniques from chemistry, biology and physics, applying these to the study and preservation of cultural and artistic works.

Art and science will converge at the 2011 North Dakota-South Dakota Joint EPSCoR Conference held on Tuesday, Oct. 4 at approximately noon in the North Dakota State University Memorial Union Ballroom, Fargo, N.D. Julie Arslanoglu, Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Scientific Research at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., is the featured speaker for the event. In addition, students from universities in North Dakota and South Dakota will share their research results in poster presentations from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The event is co-sponsored by the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research and the South Dakota EPSCoR program.

Ms. Arslanoglu, a noted research scientist, will discuss “What Lies Beneath? Understanding Art Using Science.” Her expertise includes analysis of paint and coating composition, stratigraphy and technology. She is accomplished in the analysis of both traditional and non-traditional artists’ materials, as well as polymeric materials. Her presentation will briefly describe the contribution of scientific analysis to the understanding of artworks, as well as highlight her collaborative research project applying immunological and mass spectrometric techniques to the identification and localization to proteins and gums in artwork.

Ms. Arslanoglu obtained a bachelor’s degree in chemistry at the University of Michigan before completing her graduate studies in organic chemistry at The Pennsylvania State University. Her career began as a medicinal chemist with her research specializing in drug metabolism and enzyme mechanisms at the National Cancer Institute (The National Institutes of Health) in Washington D.C., and she continued her research at the Biochemistry Department at The University of Texas, San Antonio. Ms. Arslanoglu became interested in the field of art conservation and was awarded a fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution, Materials Conservation Institute, Washington D.C.

Ms. Arslanoglu received her post-graduate diploma in the conservation easel paintings from the Courtauld Institute of Art, London, United Kingdom, while completing scientific research projects at the Tate Gallery and the National Gallery, London. She has held positions in the Scientific Departments of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles. In her current position at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ms. Arslanoglu collaborates with curators and conservators in the study of artworks and conducts independent research on immunological and mass spectrometric techniques of organic materials.

Along with Ms. Arslanoglu’s luncheon address, the EPSCoR conference, “Competitiveness in this new funding era,” includes undergraduate and graduate students showcasing their work through collaborative research discussions and poster sessions. Nearly 150 student poster presentations are scheduled that include topics as varied as spacesuit antennas, solar cells, breast cancer, nanocavities and many more.

About ND EPSCoR
Established in 1986 as a North Dakota University System program, the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research strengthens the state’s science and technology infrastructure and enhances its participation in competitive research and development. http://www.ndepscor.nodak.edu

NDSU’s Interactive Device Research, Media Effects Lab Effort Receive NSF Funding I 9/28/2011

September 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– The National Science Foundation has awarded a $300,000 grant to NDSU to develop new interfaces for interactive devices such as smart phones and tablets, and to begin building a media effects lab to benefit social scientific work at the university.

The project, titled “MRI: Development of a Cross-Platform Infrastructure for Natural Interaction Research,” is led by principal investigator Jun Kong, assistant professor of computer science. Co-principal investigators are Nan Yu, assistant professor of communication at NDSU; Jing Shi, associate professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering; and John Cook, interim chair/head of industrial and manufacturing engineering at NDSU.

“The primary objective of this proposal is to develop a cross-platform infrastructure that supports the research of natural interaction,” said Kong. “This infrastructure, when applying to different computing and communication devices, will provide a new way of human-computer interaction by automatically choosing the optimal modalities under various interaction scenarios. It provides the necessary instruments for developing novel interfaces, especially on newly released mobile devices.”

According to Yu, the research group will build a media effects lab that allows NDSU scholars and students to investigate a variety of new technologies and media, and observe how users may interact with them.

“This grant will be used to carry out research on designing new interfaces for devices like smart phones or tablet PCs which may improve the interaction between users and electronic devices,” Yu said. “Additionally, the grant allows us to examine the usability and effectiveness of these new designs and to understand how they could be modified to adjust to various needs in different interaction contexts. It is our hope that this grant can support the enhancement of creativities and innovations related to research on new interaction devices.

The grant award funding runs from Sept. 15, 2011 to Aug. 31, 2014.

Assistant Professor’s Research at NDSU Featured in Minnesota Public Radio Story I 9/28/2011

September 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Dil Thavarajah, assistant professor in the School of Food Systems at NDSU, was featured recently in a story by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR).

The topic was the research being conducted at the NDSU Pulse Quality Lab to increase nutritional value of pulse crops in developing nations. Thavarajah is exploring crop varieties that contain essential nutrients as well as being a source of protein.

The story discussed the research activities conducted by Thavarajah; her husband, Thava, a chemist; plant breeder Kevin McPhee; and Gerry Combs, director of the USDA Human Nutrition Lab.

NDSU Research Foundation Licenses Coatings Technology to Elinor Specialty Coatings: Novel BronzeShield™ Coatings Technology Preserves Art and Monuments I 9/27/2011

September 27, 2011, Fargo, N.D. ––The NDSU Research Foundation announced it has concluded a license agreement with Elinor Specialty Coatings, Fargo, for removable protective coatings for outdoor bronze monuments and statues. The agreement, announced Sept. 27, gives Elinor exclusive rights to further develop and market the technology developed at NDSU.

From the statue of Sakakawea near North Dakota’s Heritage Center in Bismarck to Rodin’s Burghers of Calais in France, thousands of bronze monuments worldwide endure exposure to pollutants, temperature extremes and all types of weather, from hurricanes to blizzards. Left uncoated or improperly coated, statues can deteriorate, which may result in huge costs to restore them properly.

The unique polymer technology licensed to Elinor Specialty Coatings and marketed as BronzeShield,™ allows the original patina of the bronze to remain, while protecting monuments, art and architecture from salt, UV radiation, moisture and vandalism. “We believe it is a durable, yet maintenance-friendly option for municipalities, museums and historical societies to protect history,” said Dante Battocchi, research and technical officer of Elinor Specialty Coatings.

“Monuments are meant to last forever, but budget constraints often cause public art to go unprotected,” said Holly Anderson Battocchi, president of Elinor. “It can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to restore a piece of public art. BronzeShield’s durability, and easy application and removal, allow for a more economical way for curators to manage the maintenance schedule and yet retain the integrity of the art as the artist intended.”

BronzeShield™ provides shiny or matte protection similar to that of clear-coats on automobiles, yet is removable using an uncomplicated and safe liquid coating remover, which eliminates the damage caused by traditional mechanical removal methods, says Dante Battocchi. Samples of BronzeShield™ are now being sent to potential clients around the country, including one of the largest bronze workshops in the U.S.

Others playing a role in years of development leading to the specialty coating include former NDSU graduate student Tara Shedlosky; NDSU professors Gordon Bierwagen and Dean Webster; NDSU’s Center for Surface Protection, a state economic development Center of Excellence; the NDSU Product Design Center; the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research; and federal Department of Interior funding supported by the state’s Congressional delegation.

“We are thrilled to see this specialty coatings technology reach the market through Elinor Specialty Coatings,” said Dale Zetocha, executive director of the NDSU Research Foundation, which licenses technologies developed at NDSU. “It represents a great opportunity to commercialize this research.” 

About Elinor Specialty Coatings
Elinor Specialty Coatings solves problems in coatings-related markets through technology and scientific research. Elinor is addressing a challenge in maintenance and preservation of historical works of art through a recently-licensed technology from North Dakota State University  known as BronzeShield.™ www.elinorcorp.comor www.bronzeshield.net

About the NDSU Research Foundation
The NDSU Research Foundation is an independent, not-for-profit organization that supports NDSU in its teaching, research and public service missions. The Foundation manages the intellectual property developed by faculty, staff and students doing research at NDSU and facilitates commercialization of these technologies.  www.ndsuresearchfoundation.org 

About NDSU
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects.  www.ndsu.edu/research

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish and Present I 9/26/2011

September 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Anita Gust, doctoral student in the wellness program at NDSU; David Barney of Oklahoma State University; and Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, had the manuscript, “College Students’ Usage of Personal Music Players During Exercise,” accepted to the International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Research Journal.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of English and education at NDSU, and West Fargo teachers Alissa Helm and Molly Bestge, will present at the 100th anniversary conference of the National Council of Teachers of English in Chicago, Nov. 17-22. Their presentation, "Common Core Standards and the Dilemma of Writing a District-wide Curriculum," is based on a yearlong project to adopt the common core standards and write district curriculum that aligns with the new standards. The discussant for their presentation will be Anne Gere, director of the Council’s James R. Squire Office of Policy Research, in Washington, D.C.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was the keynote speaker at the Montana Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance 75th anniversary convention held in Helena, Mont. The title of his speech was “The Role of a Lifetime.” He also presented a session for future professionals titled “Intentional Networking and Professionalism.”

Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was invited to give the keynote lecture at the 16th annual Japanese Fitness Association meeting in Tokyo. This will be Liguori’s second trip to speak at the conference.

NDSU Associate Professor’s Management Articles to be Published I 9/26/2011

September 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Joseph Szmerekovsky, associate professor of management at NDSU, has had two articles accepted for publication. "Teaching Critical Chain Project Management: The Academic Debate and Illustrative Examples," co-written with Will Milhiser, was accepted to INFORMS Transactions on Education.  "An Integer Programming Formulation for the Project Scheduling Problem with Irregular Time-Cost Tradeoffs," co-written with Prahalad Venkateshen, was accepted to Computers and Operations Research.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Lecture Scheduled I 9/22/2011

September 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Distinguished scientist Eric Wong will present a research lecture on “Glioblastoma: Tumor Biology, Treatment and Diet” Thursday, Sept. 29, from 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. in Sudro Hall room 26. The seminar is part of a series of research lectures sponsored by the NDSU pharmaceutical sciences department in the College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Allied Sciences. It is open to anyone interested in pharmaceutical and biomedical research.

Dr. Wong, who is an associate professor of neurology, director of the Neuro-Oncology Unit and co-director of the Brain Tumor Center at the Department of Neurology/Harvard Medical School, also will meet with pharmaceutical sciences department faculty and graduate students during his visit to NDSU.

Wong earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and Doctor of Medicine degree from Rutgers Medical School. He has published 68 peer-reviewed papers and numerous abstracts. Wong’s research has been funded by National Institutes of Health and pharmaceutical and biomedical companies. Wong has received numerous honors, including Saul R. Korey Award in Experimental Neurology of American Academy of Neurology. He has served on advisory boards of DepoCyt (Chiron Therapeutics), Gliadel (Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc.)  and Keppra (UCB Pharma Inc.). Wong currently serves as president of the Massachusetts Society of Clinical Oncologists.

NDSU English Faculty Publish Chapters on Online Environments | 9/22/2011

September 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Three NDSU English faculty have published chapters in the newly released anthology “Computer-Mediated Communication across Cultures: International Interactions in Online Environments.”

Andrew Mara and Miriam Mara, associate professors at NDSU, co-wrote “Irish Identification as Exigence: A Self-Service Case Study for Producing User Documentation in Online Contexts.” Their chapter examines online and hardcopy user documents from an Irish do-it-yourself tourism company and investigates modes of motivation for overcoming breakdowns. Their case study offers ways to create documentation in global online environments.

Bruce Maylath, professor, co-wrote “Communicating Pragmatics about Content and Culture in Virtually Mediated Educational Environments,” with Birthe Mousten, Aarhus University, Denmark; John Humbley, University of Paris - Denis Diderot, France; and Sonia Vandepitte, University College Ghent, Belgium. Their chapter explores the linguistic elements their students have employed to work diplomatically with international partners in virtual teams. The authors drew their data from their decade-long international collaborative class partnerships known as the Trans-Atlantic Project.

Soil Science Faculty to be Featured in Television Program | 9/16/2011

September 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– NDSU soil scientists will be featured in the documentary “Salt of the Earth,” scheduled to be broadcast on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 9 p.m. on Prairie Public Television. The program is scheduled to be rebroadcast on Thursday, Sept. 22, at 3 a.m.

The 30-minute program discusses soil salinity and its impacts on Northern Plains agriculture, economy and environment put together by the North Dakota Health Department, Natural Resources Conservation Service, NDSU and Soil and Water Conservation Districts of eastern North Dakota.

Faculty members participating from the soil science department in the School of Natural Resource Sciences are Larry Cihacek, Tom DeSutter and David Hopkins. Also participating are former NDSU graduate students Hal Weiser and Chris Augustin and current graduate student Lee Briese.

NDSU Professor’s Article Included on Biology and Medicine Website | 9/16/2011

September 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Robert Sylvester, professor of pharmacy practice at NDSU, was lead author of the article, “Evaluation of methadone absorption after topical administration to hospice patients,” which was selected for recognition by a member of the Faculty of 1,000. The Faculty of 1,000, is an open-access repository of published scientific research articles, conference posters and presentations.  Sylvester’s article was published in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

According to Faculty of 1,000 editor-in-chief Sarah Greene, this places Sylvester’s work in the top 2 percent of published articles in biology and medicine. “The service is widely used to find significant new research articles, and the inclusion of your article should significantly increase its visibility,” Greene wrote in an email to Sylvester.

The evaluation of the article can be viewed at http://f1000.com/13200005. Registration is required.

According to its website, http://f1000.com/, Faculty of 1,000 is a peer-nominated, global panel of more than 10,000 expert scientists and clinical researchers. It provides access to top published articles in biology and medicine.

Center for Global Initiatives Director Publishes Articles | 9/16/2011

September 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Newell Wright, director of the Center for Global Initiatives at NDSU, recently had three journal articles accepted for publication in refereed journals.

The first article, co-written with Val Larsen, an associate professor of marketing at James Madison University, is titled “Every Brick Tells a Story: Study Abroad as an Extraordinary Experience.” The paper will be published in the August 2012 edition of the journal Marketing Education Review. 

According to the authors, research on study abroad programs traditionally focuses on logistics or the development of attitudes and skills. Less attention has been given to the subjective value of the participants’ experience, which is the focus of the study. Drawing insights from an evolving genre of graffiti data and autodriving interviews, the study identifies dimensions of the study abroad experience that cause participants to describe it as life changing and the best experience of their lives.  The article discusses the implications of its findings for study abroad program management.

A second article, also co-written with Larsen, is titled “Bringing Culture Alive in the Marketing Classroom:  Using the Novel ‘Speaker for the Dead’ to Teach Global Marketing.” The article will be published in the Academy of Educational Leadership Journal in March 2012. 

According to the authors, cultural awareness and sensitivity is one of the most important topics in international marketing courses. But when students have little or no personal experience dealing with different cultures, it can be difficult for them to deeply understand the manifold ways in which cultural differences and consequent misunderstandings affect global marketing effectiveness. The article proposes a pedagogical remedy for students’ lack of experience with cultural differences— having them read and discuss the novel “Speaker for the Dead” by Orson Scott Card. The article highlights telling details in the novel that graphically illustrate important global marketing concepts such as the self-reference criterion. The article concludes with suggestions on how to incorporate literature into many different marketing courses.

A third article, co-written with Larsen and Joseph Goodman, assistant professor of management at Illinois State University, is titled “Equity Versus Utility: The Moderating Effect of Acquaintance and its Effect on Consumer Grudgeholding Behavior.”  It will appear in the December 2011 edition of the Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, and Complaining Behavior.  

According to the authors, utility theory and equity theory make contradictory predictions about the effects of declining costs on consumer satisfaction. In a standard economic analysis, satisfaction increases as costs fall but in an equity theoretical analysis satisfaction decreases as costs fall when the consumer receives more than she gives up in exchange for a benefit. This study demonstrates that the claims of both these widely accepted theories may be valid if the effects of cost on satisfaction are moderated by degree of acquaintance with the exchange partner. Where personal acquaintance is high, the effects predicted by equity theory predominate. Where acquaintance is low, the effects predicted by utility theory predominate. Secular changes in marketing philosophy (the shift to a service dominant logic in marketing) and the growth of technologies that facilitate mass personalization (the Internet, databases, social networking) make degree of perceived acquaintance an important marketing variable.  This variable is a double-edged sword that can magnify consumer responses to good/bad experiences with a business.

NDSU Anthropology Assistant Professor Publishes 9/11 Work | 9/15/2011

September 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Joy Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of anthropology at NDSU, had her research narrative essay titled, “Re/placing the World Trade Center” published in Anthropology News, the monthly publication for members of the Anthropological Association of America.

The essay is available on the Anthropology News website at www.anthropology-news.org/. In addition, her photograph of the Tribute in Light Memorial is featured on the Anthropological Association of America’s homepage at www.aaanet.org/

Sather-Wagstaff returned to New York City Sept. 10-12, the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, for ongoing research at the former World Trade Center site as part of her longitudinal study on tourism at the site as it continues to become a formal memorial site and home to a future memorial museum.

New Research Says Sweets Help Your Disposition | 9/15/2011

September 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– A new study by NDSU alumni and a faculty member suggests people with a “sweet tooth” have sweeter dispositions. The research was conducted by Brian Meier, PhD ’05 and an associate professor of psychology at Gettysburg College; Michael D. Robinson, NDSU professor of psychology; and Sara Moeller, MS ’08, PhD ’11, and assistant professor at Saint Xavier University.

The paper, “Sweet Taste Preferences and Experiences Predict Pro-Social Inferences, Personalities, and Behaviors,” has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

According to Meier, “Taste is something we experience every day. Our research examined whether metaphors for taste preferences and experiences can be used to shed light on personality traits and behavior.”

In one study, the authors found participants who ate a sweet food (a piece of Dove's chocolate) versus a non-sweet food (a cracker) or no food were more likely to volunteer to help another person in need. The authors also found that people believe that a person who likes sweet foods like candy or chocolate cake is also more agreeable or helpful.

"It is striking that helpful and friendly people are considered ‘sweet’ because taste would seem to have little in common with personality or behavior. Yet, recent psychological theories of embodied metaphor led us to hypothesize that seemingly innocuous metaphors can be used to derive novel insights about personality and behavior," said Meier.

Robinson said, “Our results suggest there is a robust link between sweet tastes and pro-social behavior. Such findings reveal that metaphors can lead to unique and provocative predictions about people's behaviors and personality traits.”

The authors also showed that people who like sweet foods versus individuals who do not were higher in the personality trait of agreeableness and were more likely to volunteer to help clean up their city after it experienced a major flood. In other words, the authors demonstrated people can predict how helpful or nice someone is based on whether he or she prefers eating sweet foods. 

Miles Riemer-Peltz of Gettysburg College also was a co-author of the paper.

Evolution: Not as Long as You Think | 9/13/2011

September 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Research conducted by a team of biological scientists published in PLoS ONE suggests that conservation biologists and managers should consider the prospect that populations transferred to new environments might rapidly evolve and foil original management plans. The paper, “Contemporary Evolutionary Divergence for a Protected Species following Assisted Colonization,” is based on research by Dr. Craig Stockwell, a James A. Meier associate professor in biological sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, with Dr. Michael Collyer, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Ky., as lead author, and Dr. Jeffrey Heilveil, SUNY College, Oneonta, N.Y.

Study results raise the question of whether current biological conservation practices should take into account the possibility of contemporary evolution, to increase the chances of species survival from extinction.

Although studies of threatened species typically focus on factors associated with extinction risk, this published study reports a case of contemporary evolution for a recently introduced population of protected White Sands pupfish (Cyprinodon tularosa) in southern New Mexico.

To hedge a bet against extinction of a species, conservation biologists may colonize certain species in an effort to protect them. Such refuge populations are considered “genetic replicates” that could be used for future re-colonization in the event of a catastrophe in the species’ native site.

The study by Stockwell, Collyer and Heilveil shows divergence in body shape in an approximately 30-year-old refuge population of the protected White Sands pupfish (Cyprinodon tularosa). The result is a body-shape mismatch with its native environment, reflecting a case of contemporary evolution (over a 30-year period).

“Darwin, instead of visiting the Galapagos Islands, could have visited the western United States and deduced the same patterns of speciation following isolation by studying the various pupfish species,” Stockwell points out.  “Today, most pupfish species are threatened with extinction.  As a consequence, pupfish are routinely transplanted to new habitats to reduce their risk of extinction.”  

Because pupfish populations have been isolated over both pre-historic and contemporary time scales, they provide an ideal opportunity to evaluate the mode and tempo of evolutionary divergence.  Two native populations of the White Sands pupfish were isolated in Salt Creek (a saline creek) and Malpais Spring (a relatively fresh water spring) about 3000 to 5000 years ago.  In the 1970s, two new populations were established, with one population introduced to another saline creek, Lost River, and the other to another spring, Mound Spring.

Stockwell previously used molecular markers to show that both of these introduced populations descended from the native Salt Creek population. Subsequently, Collyer’s dissertation research focused on applying geometric morphometrics to study body shape variation within and among native and recently established pupfish populations.  The fish from the spring populations were found to be deep bodied, whereas the fish from the salty creeks were slender.   “These body shapes make evolutionary sense because salt increases the density of water, giving a selective advantage to fish with slender bodies compared to fish with deep bodies,” said Stockwell.

The current paper published in PLoS provides geometric morphometric analyses to evaluate fish raised in a common garden study, demonstrating that body shape is heritable and thus, the divergence reflects adaptive evolutionary divergence over two different time scales.

These research findings suggest that the Mound Spring population is a poor “replicate” for the native Salt Creek population.   In addition, the observed morphological divergence of pupfish, instead of taking millennia, could theoretically have happened soon after the populations were isolated, maybe within a few decades.

 “Studies concerning threatened species often focus on factors promoting extinction risk, but our study shows that a common management practice such as assisted colonization can have observable evolutionary impacts within a few decades,” Stockwell explains.  “This is important because such evolution may result in refuge populations that are actually mal-adapted to their native habitat.”

Research funding included U.S. Department of Defense Legacy Resource Program Grant no. DACA87-00-H-0014, an EPA-STAR North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research grant to Dr. Stockwell, and a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results fellowship to Dr. Collyer.  Dr. Heilveil is a former postdoctoral student of Dr. Stockwell and Dr. Collyer, a Ph.D. student advised by Dr. Stockwell.

More information:

Contemporary Evolutionary Divergence for a Protected Species following Assisted Colonization
 
“The Rate of Evolution,” Interview with Dr. Craig Stockwell

Contemporary evolution meets conservation biology

NDSU Science Café Scheduled for Sept. 13 | 9/6/2011

September 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– The NDSU Science Café presentation, “Energy and our future: What is the problem, how big is it and what are our options?” is scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m. in Stoker’s Basement, Hotel Donaldson, 101 N. Broadway, Fargo. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Kenton Rodgers, professor of chemistry and biochemistry at NDSU, will lead the discussion, which will address current energy consumption issues and how they could increase in the foreseeable future. He also will present on whether or not current technology can meet projected energy needs.

According to Rodgers, discussions of energy seem to be dominated by two points of view in how society is powered – change or stay the same. Advocates of change are driven by environmental and future quality-of-life concerns raised by using fossil fuels. The opposing viewpoint, steered by economic and political interests, defends the current energy processes.

“Public discourse related to our energy future is often emotionally and politically charged, in part because opposing points of view both use fear tactics to influence the way the general public thinks about energy issues,” Rodgers said. “Nevertheless, most people seem to agree that our societies operate through the use of very large amounts of energy and that the amount is getting larger.”

The Science Café is a monthly presentation by a scientist to spur discussion on various topics. It is sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Student Awarded Fellowship | 9/6/2011

September 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Erin Nyren-Erickson, a doctoral student in pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, has received a pre-doctoral fellowship from the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education. The fellowship is awarded to outstanding pre-doctoral students of pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry sciences in support of their research program. The fellowship is a nationally competitive award; approximately 60 awards are presented across the U.S. each year.

Nyren-Erickson has been studying with Sanku Mallik, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, since 2009. Mallik’s research is concerned with the sensitive detection of various cancer-related enzymes, as well as other disease-related biomarkers. Her most recent projects involve the detection of elevated levels of glycosaminoglycans in human serum, a possible indicator of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional ongoing studies in Mallik’s lab include amplified detection of matrix metalloproteinases and other enzymes associated with metastatic cancer.

NDSU Center for Protease Research Hosts Research Poster Session | 9/6/2011

September 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– The Center for Protease Research held its annual “Undergraduate Research Poster Session” Aug. 4 in the Memorial Union. Thirty students presented posters on their scientific research performed at NDSU.

The presenters included 13 students visiting campus on a 10-week fellowship sponsored by the center. The students come from around the country to participate in the center’s summer research program funded by the National Institutes of Health. The competitive program brings outstanding students to NDSU to experience scientific research in state-of-the-art laboratory settings. Outreach to students is one of the center’s objectives, and program director Mukund Sibi works with faculty from four university departments to develop a strong science program. 

Four presenters were local high school students who have been working in the chemistry and biochemistry department during the summer as part of the Parents’ Involvement in Children, Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science (PICNICS) program, which is managed by Sivaguru Jayaraman.

At the poster session, Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, presented certificates to visiting summer students. He also presented plaques to Sibi to commemorate his receiving the College Mentoring Award and to Jayaraman, for receiving the College Teaching Award.

NDSU Nursing Faculty Awarded Grant | 9/2/2011

September 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Loretta Heuer, professor of nursing at NDSU, and Dean Gross, assistant professor of nursing, received a three-year Health Resources and Human Services Administration Advanced Education Grant Award of $938,122.

The purpose of the NDSU Department of Nursing post-master’s program to Doctor of Nursing Practice Family Nurse Practice is to prepare doctor of nursing practice family nurse practitioners to provide health care services for underserved and/or rural populations. In collaboration with NDSU Distance and Continuing Education, this distance post-master’s program will enable master’s prepared registered nurses to pursue a doctor of nursing practice with eligibility to write for family nurse practitioner certification. This proposed program builds upon an existing bachelor of science in nursing – doctor of nursing program at NDSU.

ND EPSCOR Announces Award Recipients | 9/2/2011

September 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– ND Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR) has announced research awardees for its Doctoral Dissertation Assistantship program. Thirteen students competed for the assistantship awards. Five students were award recipients of stipend support ranging from six to 24 months, totaling $145,200.

ND EPSCoR’s Doctoral Dissertation Assistantship program is designed to increase the completion rate of doctoral students enrolled in science, engineering and mathematics disciplines at North Dakota’s two research-intensive universities; and to increase the number of competitive proposals submitted to the National Science Foundation.

NDSU student recipients, their departments and advisers are:

  • Kevin Betts, psychology; Verlin Hinsz, professor
  • Siqian Liu, electrical and computer engineering; Bei Gou, associate professor
  • Reddy Sathish Padi, pharmaceutical sciences; Bin Guo, associate professor
  • Erin (Pavlacky) Saville, coatings and polymeric materials; Dean Webster, professor
  • Anil Wagh, pharmaceutical sciences; Benedict Law, assistant professor


North Dakota EPSCoR is a federally and state funded program designed to help university researchers compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in sciences, engineering and mathematics. For more information, visit www.ndepscor.nodak.edu

Smartphone Disaster Recovery App Available Free for Those Recovering from Hurricane Irene | 8/29/2011

August 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– A smartphone app developed by North Dakota State University Extension Service and Myriad Devices could help people who need to document damages from this weekend’s Hurricane Irene for their insurance claims. The Disaster Recovery Log app helps you record information about damages to your home and property using text, images and audio.

Download Disaster Recovery Log from the Android Market.  http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/extension/apps/disaster-recovery-journal

The Disaster Recovery Log (DRL) app will help you record damage caused by flooding or other disasters. It is available free through the Android market.

DRL uses the smartphone’s camera feature to capture photos to illustrate the flood damage. Users can key-in  descriptions of damaged items or use their smartphone’s voice recorder to record an audio description of the damage. These details and photos are essential for possible insurance and/or government reimbursement.

Each damaged item is entered as a "Detail" organized under a "Disaster." You start by adding a "Disaster." Then you add "Details" to that "Disaster" to document your losses. You can enter text, add photos using your camera or gallery, and add audio using your sound recorder of choosing from saved audio files.

DRL also provides NDSU Extension Service information on how to clean or deal with flood-damaged appliances and electronics; carpets and floors; clothing and fabrics; food; furniture; gardens and landscapes; home structures; household items; mold; papers, books and photos; and water.

The app was developed by NDSU Extension Service  and Myriad Devices, and funded with USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Smith-Lever Special Needs grants.

The NDSU Extension Service web site also offers extensive information for those who are cleaning up after a flood or other natural disaster, found at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/flood with resources in English, Spanish, Arabic, Serbo-Croatian and American Sign Language.

The latest updated version of the Disaster Recovery Log (DRL) from Myriad Devices available soon will include the ability to export data. Myriad Devices is a start-up mobile software company founded by two NDSU electrical and computer engineering professors, Chao You and Mark Schroeder, and Jake Joraanstad (computer engineering). The company is located in the NDSU Research and Technology Park.

More information:

Download Disaster Recovery Log free for Android Market
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/extension/apps/disaster-recovery-journal
and https://market.android.com/details?id=md.apps.nddrjournal&feature=search_result

NDSU Extension Service – Clean Up After Natural Disasters
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/flood

Myriad Devices – www.myriaddevices.com

NDSU Emergency Management Professors Contribute to Book | 8/29/2011

August 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – NDSU emergency management faculty members Carol Cwiak, Jessica Jensen, Daniel J. Klenow and George A. Youngs contributed chapters to the edited book, “Challenges of Emergency Management in Higher Education: Planning and Strategies.” The book recently was published by the Public Entity Risk Institute in Fairfax, Va.

Cwiak’s chapter is titled “Next Steps in Emergency Management’s Professionalization Process: Who Will Be the Gatekeeper of the Profession of Emergency Management?” Jensen’s chapter is titled “The Argument for a Disciplinary Approach to Emergency Management Higher Education.” The chapter by Klenow and Youngs is titled “Developing and Maintaining Emergency Management Graduate Programs.”

NDSU Pharmaceutical Science Student Presents at National Conference | 8/29/2011

August 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Kruttika Bhat, a doctoral student in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and cellular and molecular biology program at NDSU, submitted an abstract titled “DHA Sensitizes Etoposide to Induce Apoptosis in Brain Tumor Cells” to the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. It was selected as a poster that was presented at the association’s annual meeting in San Antonio, July 10-13.

The abstract received high scores from three reviewers of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Two gave full scores to the abstract and one gave an excellent score. All of the reviewers commented that the abstract is an important and interesting study, according to Erxi Wu, Bhat’s doctoral thesis mentor in the pharmaceutical sciences department. “Recently, Kruttika Bhat and Fengfei Wang, research associate in the lab, have demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid modulates the cytotoxic effect of etoposide (VP16) in medulloblastoma cells. We also have illustrated that the combination of DHA with VP16 in medulloblastoma cells altered multiple signaling pathways. Among them, DNA repair and growth factors/PI3K/MAPK pathways are likely the major contributors to the cytotoxic effects,” Wu said. The work recently has been published in Current Molecular Medicine.

NDSU Pharmacy Practice Faculty Present at National Meeting | 8/26/2011

August 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Several members of the pharmacy practice department attended and held prominent roles at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy in San Antonio, July 10-13.

Jeanne Frenzel, associate professor at NDSU, was first author and presenter of the poster, “Team Based Learning to Assess Practical Pharmacy Competencies.” Heidi Eukel, assistant professor, was first author and presenter of the poster, “Amazing Self-Care Race.” Elizabeth Skoy, assistant professor, was first author and presenter of the poster, “Medication Error Reporting Form to Document Adverse Events in a Practical Pharmacy Skills Laboratory.” In addition, Frenzel presented “Innovations in the Pharmacy Skills Laboratory” at a special session sponsored by the Lab Special Interest Group with Eukel and Skoy.

Amy Werremeyer, assistant professor, and Skoy also presented the poster, “Photovoice to Characterize Learning During an International Medical Mission-based Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience.” 

NDSU Criminal Justice Associate Professor and Student Publish | 8/26/2011

August 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Carol Archbold, associate professor of criminal justice at NDSU, will have a book published with Aspen Publishing in August. The book, "Women and Policing in America: Classic and Contemporary Readings," is a text/reader hybrid. Kimberly Hassell from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Dorothy Moses Schulz from John Jay College in New York City co-wrote the book.

Ericka Wentz, a criminal justice doctoral student, and Archbold will have their paper, "Police perceptions of sexual assault victims: Exploring the intra-female gender hostility thesis," published in Police Quarterly in March 2012.

NDSU Summer Program Engages High School Students in Science | 8/26/2011

August 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at NDSU hosted students from Fargo high schools during the summer as part of the PICNICS (Parents Involvement with Children, Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science) program. The program aims to inform parents and their children about recent advancements in science and technology, and encourage ninth through 12th graders to consider science as a career path.

Four students participated in the 2011 summer program and were selected based on recommendations from their teachers. They were Tyler Ridl and Wei (Amy) Yu from Fargo South High School, and Kristina Rindy and Benjamin Court from Fargo North High School. They worked alongside graduate students and postdoctoral fellows and carried out research.

The PICNICS program was conducted in collaboration with Todd Bertsch, principal at Fargo South High School; Carol Beaton, advanced placement science teacher at Fargo South High School; Mark Blanshan, vice-principal at Fargo North High School and Terri Court Counselor, North Fargo High School.

Sivaguru Jayaraman, Mukund Sibi, Greg Cook and John Hershberger, all faculty from the chemistry and biochemistry department at NDSU, hosted students in their research groups. At the end of the program, the students presented a poster on the research carried out at a reception hosted by the department and Center for Protease Research. Parents and friends of participating students, NDSU students and faculty, teachers and the principal of South High attended the poster session. Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, presented certificates of completion to students in recognition of their research contribution during the PICNICS summer program.

"Informing both parents and their children in organized settings regarding the importance of science and technology will help them make informed decisions toward science and math when considering college majors and career paths," said Jayaraman, program director and associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry. The PICNICS program was initiated with funding from the National Science Foundation CAREER Award to Jayaraman (CHE-0748525).

For more information regarding the PICNICS program, visit
http://sivagroup.chem.ndsu.nodak.edu/outreach/PIcnics_Program.html

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Paper on Pancreatic Cancer Therapy | 8/26/2011

August 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, co-wrote the article, “Perspectives on the role of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer,” which has been accepted by International Journal of Photoenergy. The paper will appear in the focus issue, "Photodynamic Therapy."

According to the authors, photodynamic therapy is a non-invasive procedure involving a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light to produce reactive oxygen species that selectively destroy tumor cells. In recent years, it has been used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The anti-tumor effects of photodynamic therapy include three main mechanisms: direct tumor cell death (necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy), vascular destruction and immune system activation. The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma and Wei Li in the Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.

“This article systematically summarizes the effects of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer from the experimental studies to the clinical studies and discusses the mechanisms of PDT-induced pancreatic cancer destruction,” Wu said. “Together with the Ma lab, we commit to finding cancer therapeutics and elucidating the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death.”

International Journal of Photoenergyis a peer-reviewed, open-access journal that publishes original research articles, as well as review articles in all areas of photoenergy. The journal consolidates research activities in photochemistry and solar energy utilization into a single forum for discussing and sharing knowledge. For more information on the journal, visit www.hindawi.com/journals/ijp

NDSU’s Impact on North Dakota Noted in Wall Street Journal | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – An article in the Wall Street Journal, “Frigid North Dakota is a hot draw for college students,” notes NDSU’s growth as a nationally-recognized research university and college of choice. The article notes NDSU’s ranking in the elite “very high research activity” category of the Carnegie Commission on higher education, the school’s educational value for students, and its international focus.

Several NDSU students are featured in the article, including Maduka Bandara of Sri Lanka, who graduated from NDSU after working with the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering in the NDSU Research and Technology Park. Bandara now works for Pedigree Technologies, a company founded by NDSU alum Alex Warner, located in the NDSU Research Park. The Wall Street Journal article is found at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304231204576406042109860376.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Fargo Listed Among Best College Towns in Nation | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Fargo, the home of NDSU, has been ranked among the top 10 college towns in the country by Livability.com. The website placed Fargo 10th on a list including such communities as Louisville, Ky.; College Station, Texas; Auburn, Ala.; Ann Arbor, Mich.; Madison, Wis.; and Boulder, Colo.

According to the website, the cities “give the student great places to learn, grow and play, while at the same time giving residents the benefits that come with being near a vibrant educational institution. In a nutshell, they've got a lot to offer whether you're after a degree, a new career or a place to settle down.”

Livability.com’s description of Fargo states, “In a city made famous by cold weather and the Coen brothers, college-goers are quickly warming up to the idea of going to school here. Home to multiple campuses, Fargo has earned the reputation of a bona fide college town, but that's only half the attraction. With a low unemployment rate and plenty of entertainment options, Fargo is fast becoming a location destination of choice.”

For more information, visit http://livability.com/top-10

NDSU Business Faculty Publish Papers | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Jin Li, assistant professor of marketing at NDSU, and Chanchai Tangpong, associate professor of management, had two papers accepted for publication: "The Role of Agent Conscientiousness and Reciprocity Norm in Employee Layoff Decisions" in Management Research Review; and "Ethical Receptive Capacity and Teaching Business Ethics" in International Journal of Society Systems Science.

Visit www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=mrr for information on Management Research Review. Visit www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalCODE=ijsss for information on the International Journal of Society Systems Science.

NDSU Agribusiness and Applied Economics Faculty Publish Research | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Several agribusiness and applied economics faculty have had papers accepted for publication or recognized for superior quality.

William Wilson, Distinguished Professor, had his paper, "Impacts of Congestion and Stochastic Variables on the Network for U.S. Container Imports," accepted for publication in the Journal of Transport Economics and Policy.

Cole Gustafson, professor and biofuels economist at NDSU, and Thein Maung, research assistant professor, had their article, “The Economic Feasibility of Sugar Beet Biofuel Production in Central North Dakota,” accepted for publication in Biomass and Bioenergy.

Dragan Miljkovic, professor, had his article, "Offsetting Behavior and the Benefits of Food Safety Policies in Vegetable Preparation and Consumption," selected by the editorial board as the outstanding article published in year 2010 (volume 26) in Agribusiness: An International Journal.

Transportation analyst presents at international conference EunSu Lee, a transportation analyst with the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, presented research at the 2011 U.S.-Korea Conference on Aug. 10-14, hosted by the Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association and the Korean Foundation of Science and Technology Societies.

Lee presented his report, “Estimating Origin-Destination for Imported Containers through Intermodal Networks.” His research investigates the trip generation and trip distribution of freight containers moving into the United States through the marine ports. The study optimized the origin-destination for the imported containerized freights in the United States.

Lee earned both his doctorate in transportation logistics and his master’s degree in industrial management and engineering from NDSU in 2011 and 2006, respectively. Lee also earned his MBA in operations management from Hanyang University, South Korea, and a bachelor of engineering in information technology from Kwandong University, South Korea.

NDSU Students to Display Design at Minnesota State Fair | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Fourteen architecture and landscape architecture students will have a big audience for their first ever design build project this month – approximately 300,000 Minnesota State Fairgoers.

The students have designed and are constructing a four-person, energy efficient cabin as an exhibit for the Eco-Experience section of the fair.  The goal is to educate fairgoers about state-of-the-art concepts in energy efficiency in the built environment.

The cabin, also called the Passive House cabin, is suited to a Northern Minnesota climate and can be heated by the energy equivalent of nine light bulbs. It makes use of many “free” passive heat sources such as heat generated by its occupants, waste heat from appliances, passive heat from the earth and heat from the sun.

"Our goal was to research, analyze, design and build a beautiful, low-energy structure that meets the Passive House performance criteria, on a mid-market construction budget,” said Malini Srivastava, adjunct architecture instructor who leads the Design Build Studio. “This design also takes into consideration carbon implications and resource use analysis, as a step toward achieving a sustainable, efficient and affordable goal."

While the project is an educational exhibit for fairgoers, it also has provided an invaluable long-term, hands-on learning experience for the students. “The students have demonstrated immense creativity and spirit of innovation under very restrictive budget and strict performance goals,” Srivastava said.  

It also has allowed students to develop strengths in various roles such as project manager, architect, fundraiser, accountant, interior designer, drafter, contractor, builder, web designer and graphics designer.

The Design Build Studio is the first Passive House to be built and demonstrated at the fair, according to Srivastava. This also is the first time that the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has invited a student group to participate in the Eco-Experience, a major annual event concerning energy education.

After the fair, the structure will either be moved to a permanent location or dismantled and repurposed for other uses.

To see the ongoing progress on the house, visit http://ndsudesignbuild.com

NDSU Opens New Beef Cattle Research Complex | 8/18/2011

August 18, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – One of the top beef research facilities in the world is now open for business. This summer, NDSU held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new North Dakota State University Beef Cattle Research Complex. The facility, which cost more than $3 million, will help meet the challenges of 21st century beef cattle production.

NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani said the complex raises livestock research to a new level at the university. “This literally is a game-changer for NDSU and for the state of North Dakota,” Bresciani said. “It re-establishes our capacities to advance beef cattle research on a worldwide level and there is no facility at any university in this country and there are very few in the world that rival what we¹re going to be able to do here in North Dakota.”

State-of-the-art research will be conducted in a number of areas of beef production, including nutrition, reproductive physiology, genomics, cattle management and production, pre-harvest food safety, animal behavior, environmental management, nutrient management and meat sciences and carcass quality.

The facility, which can handle up to 192 cattle, will give NDSU a distinct advantage in beef cattle research. Only three other facilities in North America have the specialized feeding equipment used at the complex.

It complements intensive campus-based facilities such as the Animal Nutrition and Physiology Center and the extensive research capabilities at the Research Extension Centers in Carrington, Streeter, Hettinger and Dickinson.”

“This is a great facility that will enhance our research efforts on management, reproduction, nutrition and physiology of beef cattle. The ability to carry out precise experiments in these areas will greatly impact the beef cattle industry in the state for many years,” said Ken Grafton, interim vice president for Agriculture and University Extension, director of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and dean of NDSU’s College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources.

The complex consists of a feeding area, cattle handling system, calving pens, an office and laboratory area, and a facility for mixing and storing feed.

NDSU Researchers Develop Revolutionary Biobased Technology From Crop Materials Produced in North Dakota | 8/10/2011

August 10, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Several crops produced in North Dakota could play a significant role in biobased resins and coatings recently developed by researchers at North Dakota State University. Scientists at NDSU have developed biobased resins that may prove to be a “game changer” in coatings and resin technology.

The NDSU researchers have developed a family of resins from renewable raw materials, creating resins that eliminate hazardous components such as formaldehyde and bisphenol-A. The resins are based on sucrose and vegetable oils, and can be varied to perform in many applications and industries, according to Dean Webster, professor in the NDSU Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials. Webster’s research group includes NDSU graduate students Xiao Pan and T. J. Nelson, undergraduate student Adlina Paramarta and Partha Sengupta, former postdoctoral researcher at NDSU.

The resins developed by the NDSU research group can be made from from sugarbeets, plus oils from soybeans, flax and sunflowers. When cured, the patent-pending resins show:
- Significantly improved properties over current biobased materials and processes
- Mechanical properties comparable to petrochemical-based materials
- Dramatically increased renewable material content

“These NDSU-developed technologies achieve what few biobased materials have before,” said Webster. “They have vastly improved mechanical properties, reduced hazardous chemical content and are made from readily available materials and common processes. The technologies have the potential for significantly impacting biobased material markets.” The bio-renewable chemicals market is projected to reach $5 billion by 2015.

The new resins developed at NDSU could further reduce reliance on petrochemical-based materials, one of the main components in many coatings formulations. Dr. Webster’s research group found that the epoxidized sucrose ester resins they developed result in materials that are two- to-four times as functional as vegetable oil-based resins.

One novel ultraviolet light curable coating developed by Webster’s group cures approximately 10 times faster than existing UV-curable biobased coatings. Another in the family of biobased resins developed at NDSU exhibits properties that make it ideally suited for bio-composite materials, baking enamels and structural adhesives. Another resin demonstrates more hardness and resistance to solvents than petrochemical-based coatings.

“Interest in the use of renewable feedstocks in the synthesis of polymers is rapidly increasing, driven by consumer demand for ‘green’ products as well as the tightening of the supply of petrochemicals,” said Webster. “However, consumers are requiring that the biobased materials have physical properties that match or exceed current high performance materials.”

Laboratory research at NDSU has shown that the green technology resins developed at NDSU are far superior to existing biobased materials and comparable to petrochemical-based materials. The newly-developed resins could be used in a variety of settings including construction, architectural, biomedical, marine and electronics industries. The technology may have wide-ranging applications in areas where thermally cured materials are used, such as in protective coatings, structural adhesives, and composites. The resins are synthesized using raw materials, reagents and processes common to industry.

“They have the potential to provide a revolutionary impact in some applications replacing widely-used petrochemical-based epoxy compounds,” said Webster.

Funding for the biobased coatings research was provided by the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service under grant number 2007-38202-18597. The United Soybean Board is sponsoring current biobased coatings research at NDSU. The base sucrose ester resins used in this research were provided by P&G Chemicals.

Webster’s research is among a broad-based research portfolio in renewable technologies at NDSU, with research funded by USDA, the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy and entities in North Dakota, including the North Dakota Renewable Energy Council and North Dakota Soybean Council.

Webster has been involved in polymer synthesis and structure-property relationships of coating binder systems for more than 20 years. He is receiving the prestigious Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings from the American Chemical Society on August 29, 2011, during the group’s annual meeting in Denver, Colo.

Dr. Webster has authored more than 75 peer-reviewed papers and publications and is credited with 11 patents (an additional 18 pending) on coatings related topics. He has won Roon Foundation Awards for the best paper in the 2003, 2004 and 2006 International Coatings Exposition (ICE) of the American Coatings Association. Dr. Webster’s career in the coatings industry includes research and development in the Consumer Division of Sherwin-Williams in Chicago, Ill., and at Eastman Chemical Company. He received his Ph.D. in materials engineering science and his B.S. degree in chemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

More information:
“High Biobased Content Epoxy Anhydride Thermosets from Epoxidized Sucrose Esters of Fatty Acids”
Biomacromolecules, 2011, 12 (6), pp 2416–2428  May 12, 2011
DOI: 10.1021/bm200549c   http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bm200549c

“Novel biobased epoxy compounds: epoxidized sucrose esters of fatty acids”
Green Chemistry, 2011, 13, 965-975, February 2011
DOI:  10.1039/C0GC00882F
http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2011/gc/c0gc00882f/unauth

“Impact of Structure and Functionality of Core Polyol in Highly Functional Biobased Epoxy Resins”
Macromolecular Rapid Communications 20 JUN 2011
DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100215

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/marc.201100215/abstract

NDSU Grad Student Receives Young Investigator Award | 8/9/2011

August 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – NDSU mechanical engineering graduate student Brad Traeger received the Toshiba Young Investigator Award for his presentation at the Annual Scientific Meeting of Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography held in Denver July 14-17. The award supports professional and clinical development of students within five years of completing a training program.

Traeger presented "Characterization of Anatomic Versus Effective Orifice Areas and Pressure Recovery of Native Aortic Valve Stenosis Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computed Tomography Derived In Vivo Aortic Valve-Root Geometry." He worked on the research with Sanjay Srivatsa (MD), Yildirim B. Suzen and Yechun Wang.

Two students were awarded out of five finalists selected from worldwide contestants for the Young Investigator Award. Each submitted a mini-manuscript of 1,000 words, concerning research related to the technical and clinical advancement of cardiovascular computed tomography, and presented at the annual meeting.  As a winner, Traeger's manuscript will be eligible for priority peer-reviewed publication in the prestigious Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

"Brad's work quantitatively reveals inaccuracies of Gorlin formula used in aortic stenosis diagnosis for decades, said Yechun Wang, NDSU assistant professor of mechanical engineering and Traeger's adviser.  “His work points out the need to recalibrate existing diagnostic foundations using modern medical resources, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography, together with Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. This work is a great example on how engineering approaches, like Computational Fluid Dynamics, contribute in biomedical development. To my knowledge, this is the first time that an NDSU student has won the prestigious Young Investigator Award. This is a result of close collaborations between NDSU researchers and clinical physicians, as well as the development of biomedical engineering at NDSU."

Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography is a professional society devoted exclusively to cardiovascular computed tomography. With a worldwide membership of approximately 3,500, it represents and advocates for research, education and clinical excellence in the use of cardiovascular computed tomography.

NDSU Faculty Article Analyzing Farm Size and Strength to Be Published | 8/9/2011

August 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Joleen Hadrich and Frayne Olson, assistant professors of agribusiness and applied economics at NDSU, co-wrote the paper, “Joint Measurement of Farm Size and Farm Performance: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis.” It will be published in Agricultural Finance Review, an agricultural economics journal that highlights research, Extension and teaching issues in agricultural finance.

The authors used a confirmatory factor analysis model to test the relative strength of alternative farm size and performance measures and estimated the relationship between farm size and performance latent variables. The study also investigated how the relationship between farm size and farm performance changed during a 10-year time frame. Results demonstrated a significant relationship between farm size and farm performance, but the relationship has weakened over time.

The article is available here

NDSU Assistant Professor Received National Science Foundation Grant | 8/9/2011

August 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Cristinel Ababei, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NDSU, was recently awarded a research grant by the National Science Foundation.

The three-year, $229,193 grant will help fund graduate and undergraduate students to conduct research on reliability oriented design methodologies for network-on-chip based multiprocessor systems-on-chip. As part of the educational plan of the proposal, a summer camp for sixth through eighth grade girls will be organized to encourage women in electrical engineering.

Additional information about the award is available at www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=1116022.
For more information about Ababei's research, visit http://venus.ece.ndsu.nodak.edu/~cris/

Research at NDSU Links Diet During Pregnancy to Reducing Breast Cancer Risk in Female Offspring | 8/4/2011

August 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – North Dakota State University professor Chung S. Park is among the researchers presenting at the Era of Hope scientific conference in Orlando, Fla., Aug. 2-5, hosted by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP).  Research by Dr. Park suggests that a pregnant mother’s diet that contains certain nutrients can potentially reduce the risk of breast cancer in her female offspring.

In his research titled “In Utero Exposure to Dietary Methyl Nutrients and Breast Cancer Risk in Offspring,” Dr. Park studied 45 rats that were randomized into two groups. One group served as a control while the other was fed a methyl-supplemented diet. The pups that were born were separated into groups based on the mother’s feeding regime. Females then received a chemical to induce breast cancer and were followed for tumor development. Study results showed offspring whose mothers received a methyl-supplemented diet had decreased tumor incidence and growth than the control group. They also had fewer tumors and fewer tumors that multiplied.

According to Dr. Park, augmenting the mother's diet with lipotropic nutrients (methionine, choline, folate and vitamin B12) may boost methyl metabolism. This in turn may stimulate full development of the mammary gland to induce an epigenetic imprint in the mammary gland of the fetus, decreasing its breast cancer risk.

 “The conclusions of this study suggest that we may be able to prevent the development of breast cancer in daughters of women at risk for breast cancer by supplementing the mother's diet during pregnancy,” said Park, a professor of animal sciences at North Dakota State University. “We look forward to exploring this study further to strengthen the implications of these initial findings.”

Dr. Park’s research interests include the nutritional regulation of animal growth, mammary development, lactation and mammary tumorigenesis. He received his doctorate degree in nutritional physiology from Virginia Polytechnic and State University, a master’s degree in ruminant nutrition from the University of Georgia and a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Seoul National University, Korea.

About NDSU
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, NDSU links academics to opportunities. As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities without a medical school in the U.S., based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research

About Era of Hope
One of the premier breast cancer research conferences, the Era of Hope (EOH) conference joins scientists, clinicians and breast cancer advocates committed to advancing research on the prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. From August 2-5, 2011 in Orlando, Florida, the EOH features prominent scientists and clinicians with presentations of recent remarkable advances in breast cancer research funded by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP). https://cdmrpcures.org/ocs/index.php/eoh/eoh2011

More information
“Methyl-donor nutrients inhibit breast cancer cell growth”
Animal In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1007/s11626-008-9096-y
doi: 10.1007/s11626-008-9096-y

“Role of compensatory mammary growth in epigenetic control of gene expression”
Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology http://www.fasebj.org/content/19/12/1586.full
doi: 10.1096/fj.05-3816hyp October 1, 2005 The FASEB Journal vol. 19 no. 12 1586-1591

http://www.labome.org/expert/usa/north/park/chung-s-park-887582.html

NDSU Researcher Selected to Present at Transportation Conference | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Kimberly Vachal, director of the Rural Transportation Safety and Security Center, was selected to present "Improving Roadway Safety Programs Through University-Agency Partnerships" at the University Transportation Center's Spotlight Conference in November. The event is hosted by the Transportation Research Board and sponsored by the Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

Vachal will travel to Washington, D.C., to present two posters based on safety-focused research reports. One poster is based on research from "Implementing Traffic Safety Evaluations to Enhance Roadway Safety," which addresses the importance of roadway safety and the challenges local governments with limited resources face. Traffic Safety Evaluations, which are effective, proactive tools that identify roadway safety issues, were conducted in conjunction with Barnes County, N.D.

A second poster Vachal will present is based on the report, "Identifying Factors That Predict Teen Driver Crashes." The research was conducted in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Transportation and North Dakota Safety Council to develop a strategy for intervening in driver behavior to ultimately change behavior and reduce the number of crashes.

The Rural Transportation Safety and Security Center operates in conjunction with the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute to promote and enhance the region's transportation safety and security through research, education and outreach.

NDSU Researchers Earn Outstanding Article Award | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – "Offsetting Behavior and the Benefits of Food Safety Policies in Vegetable Preparation and Consumption," an article co-written by NDSU researchers, earned the top honor of "Outstanding Article" in volume 26 of Agribusiness: An International Journal. Authors William Nganje, formerly of NDSU and now at Arizona State University; Dragan Miljkovic, NDSU professor of agribusiness and applied economics; and Elvis Ndembe, NDSU transportation and logistics doctoral student, will receive a $5,000 cash prize, a plaque and individual certificates.

The article discusses the effects of safety policies on the number of food-borne illnesses in the vegetable sector. The research studied a food safety policy related to Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point.

The team used a theory developed by Sam Peltzman who hypothesized that the tendency of people is to react to a safety regulation by increasing other risky behavior, offsetting some or all of the benefit of the regulation. The original theory was based on new safety regulations in vehicles and transportation. Results of the current study demonstrate dominant offsetting behavior in response to the policy Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point, specifically in the vegetable sector.

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Paper for Medical Journal | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences in the Wu lab, co-wrote the review article, "Xanthones from Mangosteen Extracts as Natural Chemopreventive Agents: Potential Anticancer Drugs," which has been peer-reviewed and accepted by Current Molecular Medicine.

According to the authors, the treatment and management of malignant tumors still remain a formidable challenge for public health despite decades of research. New strategies for cancer treatment are being developed, and one of the most promising treatment strategies involves the application of chemopreventive agents.
The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds. Xanthones, from the pericarp, whole fruit, heartwood and leaf of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.), are known to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacologic properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activities.

The potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities of xanthones have been demonstrated in different stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion and progression) and are known to control cell division and growth, apoptosis, inflammation and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that xanthones inhibit proliferation of a wide range of human tumor cell types by modulating various targets and signaling transduction pathways.

"This article provides a concise and comprehensive review of preclinical data and assesses the observed anticancer effects of xanthones, supporting its remarkable potential as an anticancer agent," Wu said. The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma's lab at Xi'an Jiaotong University, China. "We have recently established a close collaboration with the Ma lab in finding anticancer drugs and elucidating the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, a fatal disease," Wu said.

Current Molecular Medicine is an interdisciplinary journal focused on providing its readers with current and comprehensive reviews and original research articles on fundamental molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, the development of molecular-diagnosis and/or novel approaches to rational treatment. Its current impact factor is 5.21, ranking 12th of 106 medicine, research and experimental journals (www.benthamscience.com/cmm/index.htm).

NDSU Communication Professor Named Editor of Journal | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Robert Littlefield, professor of communication at NDSU, has been selected as the new editor of Communication Studies, a journal published five times per year by the Central States Communication Association. Littlefield was selected by the Central States Communication Search Committee and Executive Committee to serve from 2013 to 2015.

"This is a very significant professional accomplishment for Dr. Littlefield and his selection means that our department and our university continue their strong tradition of national and international scholarly and research excellence," said Mark Meister, associate professor of communication.

NDSU Emergency Management Faculty, Students Participate in Conference | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – NDSU Department of Emergency Management students, faculty and alumni were active in the 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency's 14th annual Higher Education Conference in Emmitsburg, Md., in June.

Carol Cwiak, assistant professor of emergency management at NDSU, coordinated the nomination, review and award process for the Wayne Blanchard Award that was established by NDSU to recognize academic excellence in emergency management higher education. Cwiak also gave a plenary presentation on "Incorporating Business Continuity Coursework Into Your Curriculum: Tips, Tools, and Techniques" and presented an annual national survey research report on emergency management programs. She also presented in a session on "Curriculum Mapping."

Daniel J. Klenow, head of the emergency management department at NDSU, presented at two sessions: "Maintaining and Improving Emergency Management Programs" and "Administering Emergency Management Programs in Higher Education: Experiences and Perspectives." Jessica Jensen, emergency management assistant professor, presented in the session, "Post-Graduate and Graduate Level Program Development," and also participated in the session, "Visions of the Future: Emergency Management Higher Education."

Graduate student Marc Khatchadourian presented in a session on "Establishing Career Paths in Emergency Management." Recent doctoral graduates Mike Kemp and Dan Martin also participated in conference sessions.

NDSU Recipient of a Climate and Gender Research Grant Named | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – The Advance FORWARD project has awarded Jennifer Momsen, assistant professor of biological sciences at NDSU, a climate and gender research grant for her project, "Closing the achievement gap in STEM: Assessing the impact of a values affirmation task at NDSU."

Warren Christensen, assistant professor of physics; Erika Offerdahl, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry; Lisa Montplaisir, assistant professor of biological sciences; and Mila Kryjevskaia, assistant professor of physics, are co-principal investigators on the project.

The researchers will investigate the gender achievement gap at NDSU across a broad range of introductory science, technology, engineering and mathematics courses in biology, physics and biochemistry.

The FORWARD climate and gender grants are awarded to interdisciplinary research teams whose work addresses issues of gender in the academy. The goals of these grants are to develop interdisciplinary research teams, engage faculty members in research on gender and demonstrate the value of research on gender to a gendered institution.

NDSU Scientists Help Create Special Rangelands Issue | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Several NDSU faculty and graduate students contributed to a special issue of Rangelands, a Society for Range Management journal published six times per year. The issue, released in June, was about pollination in rangelands.

Jason Harmon, assistant professor in the NDSU entomology department, and Amy Ganguli, assistant professor in the range science program, served as guest editors and wrote the introduction. They and Michelle Solga, graduate research assistant in the range science program, also wrote one of the articles, "An Overview of Pollination in Rangelands: Who, Why, and How."

Marion Harris, interim associate dean for academic programs in the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources and a professor in the entomology department; Steven Travers, assistant professor in the biological sciences department; Gerald Fauske, research specialist in the entomology department; Andrew Ross, graduate student in the biological sciences department; and Kristina Fox, graduate student in the entomology department, collaborated on an article for the issue, titled "The Hidden Benefits of Pollinator Diversity for the Rangelands of the Great Plains: Western Prairie Fringed Orchids as a Case Study." Solga also wrote an article, titled "Buzzing the Literature."

Rangelands features scientific articles, book reviews and Society for Range Management news. The journal also provides a forum for readers to obtain scientifically correct information in a user-friendly, nontechnical format. It is intended for a wide range of audiences, including educators, students, rangeland owners and managers, researchers and policymakers. It is available online at www.srmjournals.org.

NDSU Faculty Present at Australian Conference | 8/3/2011

August 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Donald Schwert, director of the Center for Science and Math Education and professor of geosciences at NDSU, and Canan Bilen-Green, executive director of the FORWARD project and professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering, presented at the 15th International Conference of Women Engineers and Scientists Conference in Adelaide, Australia, in mid-July. The presentation was a collaborative effort that included presenters from five universities with National Science Foundation ADVANCE projects.

The team presented both oral and poster sessions. The oral sessions highlighted the National Science Foundation ADVANCE initiative and best practices implemented at ADVANCE institutions. The poster sessions included overview posters from each institution showing the varied programming and paths to institutional transformation. The conference was a unique opportunity for the five institutions with National Science Foundation ADVANCE programs not only to share best practices, but also to learn about the experiences of institutions from other parts of the world. Participation in the conference by the five institutions was supported by additional National Science Foundation funding.

Tri-College University Unveils New Vaccinology Minor | 7/15/2011

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Tri-College University, in collaboration with the Greater Fargo-Moorhead Economic Development Corporation and Sanford Health, is launching a first-in-the-nation undergraduate academic minor in vaccinology, starting this fall. The addition of an academic minor in vaccinology was driven in part by a study recently completed by the Greater Fargo-Moorhead Economic Development Corporation. The study showed that a focus on vaccinology could translate into long-term sustainable economic growth for the region.

Tri-College officials believe the minor will attract interest because there are more than 2,500 students currently enrolled in life sciences and health care fields at the Tri-College partnering schools: NDSU, Concordia College and Minnesota State University Moorhead.

"It's a first-in-the-nation, and gives undergraduate students great opportunities to conduct research, interact with industry experts and secure relevant experience through industry internships. It's a win-win for everyone involved," said Tri-College University provost Tim Flakoll. The program is being managed by faculty-based "vaccinology coordinators" from each of the three partnering campuses. Local faculty will teach the courses required for the vaccinology minor and will augment the curriculum with participation from outside industry experts. Class size is expected to be 24 students. The minor will require 21-24 credit hours.

To advance the program, Sanford Health has created a Vaccinology Professorship Endowment of $150,000 to fund the faculty investment. "It's important that public and private partners participate together in solutions for community economic development and education; however, the reach of this program extends far beyond the Fargo region when you consider the significant public health need for vaccinology expertise across our nation," said Sanford Medical Center president Dennis Millirons. "We are inspired to be a part of a program that brings together innovative medical research, growth for our community and unprecedented opportunities for students."

Greater Fargo-Moorhead Economic Development Corporation president Kevin McKinnon said, "It is our goal to make Fargo-Moorhead a global destination for vaccinology research by simply plugging in our own quality graduates into an emerging regional industry."

For more information on the vaccinology minor, visit www.tri-college.org

NDSU Students Honored at National Pharmaceutics Research Meeting | 7/15/2011

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Anil Wagh and Faidat Sanusi, doctoral students in the pharmaceutical sciences department at NDSU, received awards for their poster presentations at the 43rd Pharmaceutics Graduate Student Research Meeting at the University of Wisconsin-Madison June 23-25.

Wagh, a third-year doctoral student in assistant professor Shek Hang Law's laboratory, received the Best Poster Award in the Drug and Gene Delivery category for his work, "Synthesis and Characterization of FRET-based Nanoparticles for Near-infrared Imaging."

Sanusi, a second-year PharmD/doctoral student in assistant professor Estelle Leclerc's laboratory, received the Best Poster Award in the joint categories of Pharmaceutical Analytical Methods and Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Biopharmaceutics for her her work, "Development and Characterization of new Monoclonal Antibodies against the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts."

Approximately 300 graduate students attended the meeting and 81 posters were presented. The posters were distributed in six sessions/categories. The  poster awards were attributed according to the quality of the poster. A total of eight Best Poster Awards were presented.  

The participating schools included the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The University of Iowa, University of Kansas, University of Kentucky, University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, the University of Missouri at Kansas City, the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Ohio State University, Purdue University, Wayne State University, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Toledo, University of Pittsburg, University of Buffalo and NDSU.

Extension's New Phone App to Help Flood Recovery | 7/15/2011

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – A new smartphone application from the NDSU Extension Service will help North Dakotans and others record and recover from flood damage. The Disaster Recovery Journal is available free through the Android market. The Disaster Recovery Journal allows people to use a tool they probably evacuated with: their smartphone.

The app lets users record information about damages as they enter their flooded homes using text, images and audio. The app uses the smartphone's camera feature to capture photos to illustrate the flood damage. Users then can enter descriptions of damaged items or use their smartphone's voice recorder to record an audio description of the damage. These details and photos are essential for possible insurance and/or government reimbursement.

The Disaster Recovery Journal also provides NDSU Extension Service information on how to clean or deal with flood-damaged appliances and electronics; carpets and floors; clothing and fabrics; food; furniture; gardens and landscapes; home structures; household items; mold; papers, books and photos; and water.

The app was developed by Myriad Devices, a company based in the NDSU Research and Technology Park incubator and founded by NDSU electrical and computer engineering faculty and students. The NDSU Extension Service provided design and content input, and funded the project, in cooperation with University of Minnesota Extension, through U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Smith-Lever Special Needs grants.

American Society of Animal Science Honors Two NDSU Faculty | 7/15/2011

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Dale Redmer and Kim Vonnahme, both animal sciences faculty at NDSU, received awards at the American Society of Animal Science annual meeting in New Orleans on Monday, July 11. Redmer received the Animal Physiology and Endocrinology Award and Vonnahme received the Early Career Achievement Award.

The Animal Physiology and Endocrinology Award is intended to stimulate research excellence in physiology and endocrinology. It is awarded based on basic or applied research in physiology and endocrinology with all classes of large and small animals and research work published in past 10 years.

The Early Career Achievement Award is intended to recognize achievement of young scholars working toward the mission of the American Society of Animal Science, fostering the discovery, sharing and application of scientific knowledge concerning the responsible use of animals to enhance human life and well being. Candidates for the award must have completed their most recent degree within the past 10 years and their programs must serve the mission of the American Society of Animal Science.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty Member Writes Book Chapter | 7/15/2011

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, NDSU assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the book chapter, "Prevention and management of obesity by isoflavones" with Barbara Doonan and Joseph Wu. It has been accepted by the Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing and will be included in the book, "Food and Nutritional Components in Focus: Chemistry, Analysis, Function and Effects."

According to the authors, obesity is a metabolic disease that is increasing in potentially epidemic proportions in the United States and throughout the world. Because obesity is clinically presented as manifestation of several degenerative disorders such as coronary heart disease, hypertension and type-2 diabetes, a uniformly safe and effective therapeutic regimen is as yet unavailable. The mainstay of pharmacological intervention for obesity includes suppression of appetite to curtail food intake or increased disposal of calories in the stool. Lifestyle factors including diet and nutrition may positively or adversely affect the risk of obesity.

Wu's chapter will review evidence regarding the dietary intake of soy and soy isoflavones as an adjunctive consideration for preventing and managing obesity.

"In this chapter, we evaluate results obtained from a combination of laboratory, animal and population-based studies relevant to molecular and cellular control of adipogenesis. We present and discuss the salient features of an approach aimed at identifying soy isoflavones with anti-obesity potentials. We also explore mechanistic links between dietary habits and the development of obesity, and consumption of isoflavones that might account for their anti-obesity effects," Wu said.

Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing is a scientific publisher, offering a range of peer-reviewed journals, magazines, books, databases and publishing services to the chemical science community.

NDSU Plant Pathologist Receives Distinguished Service Award | 7/15/2011
 

July 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Berlin Nelson, professor of plant pathology at NDSU, received the Distinguished Service Award at the North Central Divisional Meeting of the American Phytopathological Society held in Omaha, Neb., June 15-17.

Nelson was honored for his many contributions to the professional society and to the region's soybean growers and industry. He formerly served as president of the North Central Division's American Phytopathological Society, secretary and chair of several regional and national soybean disease committees and soil-borne disease committees. He is the current senior editor of the journal, Plant Disease. He has contributed to regional and national soybean disease research, providing new information on diseases such as soybean white mold and soybean cyst nematode.

NDSU Project Gives Mathematicians a Historical Perspective | 6/30/2011

June 30, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – It's a mathematician's glimpse of the past, and, perhaps, a connection with greatness. The Mathematics Genealogy Project, a service managed by the NDSU Department of Mathematics in association with the American Mathematical Society, resembles a "family tree." Mathematicians can discover who advised their adviser, who their adviser's adviser's adviser was, and so on back through history.

"When mathematicians start something, they cannot stop," explained Dogan Comez, NDSU professor and chair of mathematics. "We like to trace our lineage back to a big name in mathematics."

Comez proudly says his personal history includes David Hilbert, a German mathematician often considered the most influential mathematician of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The project's database currently contains more than 150,000 records and is continually growing. The website dedicated to the project receives hundreds of hits each day, and a recent mention by Wired.com magazine has triggered more interest.

"Mathematically, one idea follows another and we like to see where a theory started," Comez said, noting the same reasoning follows when considering the educational lineage of advisers. "Mathematicians are inherently interested in discovering this genealogy about themselves," he said. "Your Ph.D. adviser's influence is enormous. You usually get your main research from them, and the adviser is the primary guide to solve problems and connect us to others in the field. We revere the individual, just as our adviser did of his or her adviser."

The Mathematics Genealogy Project was the brainchild of Harry Coonce, a former faculty member at Minnesota State University, Mankato, who took a sabbatical at NDSU in the late 1990s and is still an adjunct faculty member here. When he retired in 1999, Coonce spent much of his time gathering data and information, with the aim to form a genealogy tree for all mathematicians. Since 2003, NDSU has housed the project.

It's been incredibly popular among mathematicians. Two NDSU graduate students print out requested posters of tree genealogy diagrams, usually producing 10 or more per week.

"My genealogy goes back to the 1300s," said Jim Coykendall, James A. Meier Professor of mathematics. "Once it gets so far back, it's not purely mathematics. I might have an alchemist or two in my history." Coykendall said the department has produced genealogy diagrams for each of its faculty members. The results have been interesting.

"I'd say the most celebrated mathematician since the 1400s is Carl Gauss (a German mathematician and scientist born in 1777). My lineage comes through him, as does the history of 70 to 75 percent of all mathematicians. So, Dogan and I are related," Coykendall said.

The latest recognition by Wired.com is expected to push the interest to greater heights. Engineers and people in other fields that use mathematics are expected to join in.

"This publicity really is good for us and should help us build the database," Comez said. "It's a fun project, and because there are always new mathematicians coming onto the scene, it will never end."

NDSU Faculty Awarded Grant for Collaborative Research in Antarctica | 6/30/2011

June 30, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – More NDSU students will receive the opportunity to conduct research in Antarctica. The National Science Foundation has awarded a $292,568 grant to geology professors Adam R. Lewis and Ken Lepper of North Dakota State University, Fargo, and an additional $287,416 to Jane Willenbring, assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The grant funding will be used to conduct field research in Antarctica in late 2011 and to support as many as seven graduate and undergraduate students as research continues through 2014.

The research team that will journey to Antarctica in November includes Lewis, NDSU senior Ashley Steffen of Bismarck, N.D., and graduate student Felix Zamora, Brighton, Colo. The field expedition team includes Dr. Jane Willenbring of the University of Pennsylvania. Willenbring is a 1999 NDSU graduate from Bismarck-Mandan. A McNair scholar, she completed her undergraduate degree in geological sciences at NDSU, advised by Dr. Allan Ashworth, distinguished university professor and veteran Antarctic researcher.

The NDSU research team will spend approximately eight weeks tent-camping in Antarctica from early November to early January in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The goal of the group’s research is to provide a new paleoclimate record that helps resolve the frequency and rate of melting along margins of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet during times of past warmth. This will help address some fundamental questions in Antarctic science and will also provide specific benefits to allied research in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica.

The research group will work with K–12 schools in North Dakota and Pennsylvania, conducting interviews and webcasts from Antarctica. In addition, they’ll share their research with K–12 classrooms upon their return. Participating schools may include Casselton Elementary, Ben Franklin Middle School and Kindred High School in North Dakota, and Theodore Roosevelt and Elizabeth D. Gillespie Middle Schools in Philadelphia, Penn.

The group’s research, titled “Collaborative Research: Activation of high-elevation alluvial fans in the Transantarctic Mountains—a proxy for Plio-Pleistocene warmth along East Antarctic ice margins,” focuses on using fans of sand and gravel deposited along mountain slopes as a record for melt-water production, which in turn is a proxy for inland warmth. These relatively young fans, channels, and debris-flow levees stand out as highly visible evidence for the presence of melt water in an otherwise frozen landscape. Limited data from terrestrial ice margins and significant unknowns regarding regional climate mean that Antarctica’s contribution to sea-level rise during past warm phases is unknown.

“It’s too cold today for ice or snow to melt, so there are no modern streams running down hillsides,” said Lewis. “We are trying to build a geologic record of when melting occurred in Antarctica. Early results suggest it happens about every 50,000 years, which correlates well with the earth’s orbital cycles.”

This study is expected to produce a unique record of inland melting from sites adjacent to ice sheet margins and at similar elevations. Results can be compared to models of orbital forcing, and marine and ice core records to help determine what controls regional climate along margins of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

The research team expects to return from Antarctica with approximately 500 pounds of rock and sediment to be analyzed. NDSU students will concentrate on geomorphology, sedimentology and stratigraphy of the deposits under the direction of Dr. Lewis and determine the age of the sediments under the direction of Dr. Lepper. Students at the University of Pennsylvania, under the direction of Dr. Willenbring, will take the lead in the cosmogenic dating of the sediments.

Additionally, Dr. Douglas Kowalewski, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, will provide climate modeling support and Dr. Tibor Dunai, University of Edinburgh, will conduct sample analysis as part of the research team.

Dr. Lewis will be presenting “Neogene ice-marginal climate from terrestrial records in the Transantarctic Mountains” and Dr. Allan Ashworth of NDSU will present “The Early Miocene paleoclimate of the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica” at the 11th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences, Edinburgh, Scotland, July 10–15, 2011.

Dr. Lewis’s ongoing research in Antarctica was featured in a NOVA television production titled “Secrets Beneath the Ice” on PBS.

NDSU students have participated in the Antarctic expeditions over the past three years. Previous field work in Antarctica by Lewis and Ashworth of NDSU has been featured in “Ice People,” a documentary by Emmy-winning director Anne Aghion. The film was shown at festivals around the world and has been broadcast on European and American television.

For more information:
Dr. Adam R. Lewis, North Dakota State University

Ice People” documentary

International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences

National Science Foundation
Antarctic fossils paint a picture of a much warmer continent

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Secrets Beneath the Ice
NOVA on PBS

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Showcase Work | 6/29/2011

June 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Several College of Human Development and Education faculty and students gave presentations or had research published. Yeong Rhee, NDSU associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, presented "The Relationship Between Body Composition and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease" at the Ninth International Symposium on In Vivo Body Composition Studies, in Hangzhou, China, May 21-24.

Jared Tucker, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, had a paper accepted in Obesity, a journal in the field of weight management. The manuscript, "Television Viewing and Obesity in 300 Women: Evaluation of the Pathways of Energy Intake and Physical Activity," provides additional evidence supporting the increased risk of obesity associated with abundant television viewing, and shows that one source of this increased risk is lower levels of physical activity among the frequent television viewers. Results also suggest that differences in diet (energy intake) between frequent and infrequent TV viewers were not a substantial contributor to the differences in obesity between these two groups.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family sciences at NDSU, presented the paper "Analytical Challenges in Assessing Adaptive Interventions" at the annual meeting of the Society for Prevention Research in Washington on June 2. The paper was co-written with Susanne Lee at the University of Minnesota. Hektner also presented "Supporting Positive School Outcomes at Madison Elementary School in Fargo, N.D.," at the Nurtured Heart Approach Global Summit in San Francisco in June with Angela Berge, the NDSU Cass County Extension Parenting Resource Coordinator, and others.

Jill Nelson, associate professor in the NDSU School of Education, and her research associates Kim Desmond and Clarrice Rapisarda, have had an article published in the most recent issue of The Clinical Supervisor. The article, "Student Reflections on the Journey to Being a Supervisor," is based on a qualitative research study they conducted about the experiences of doctoral students as new clinical supervisors.

Marvin D. LeNoue, a doctoral candidate in the NDSU School of Education; Tom Hall, assistant professor of educational leadership; and Myron Eighmy, professor in the School of Education Doctoral Program, had the manuscript, "Adult Education and the Social Media Revolution," published in Adult Learning.

David Silkenat, assistant professor in the NDSU School of Education, presented a talk, "The Legacy of the War, We Suppose: Suicide in Civil War Era North Carolina," at the North Carolina Civil War 150 Conference at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, N.C., in May. He also received the Guion Griffis Johnson Visiting Scholar Grant from the Southern Historical Collection at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to do research this summer.

Several NDSU health, nutrition and exercise sciences faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students attended the national American College of Sports Medicine convention in Denver in June. Gary Liguori presented a slide presentation, "Changes in Fitness and Power in Army ROTC Cadets." Liguori also will present the slide presentation "Changes in Fitness and Power in Army ROTC Cadets," compiled by Liguori, John Schuna, Emily Geffre, Casey Radenic, Denise Ching and Donna J. Terbizan.

Several NDSU faculty also lead poster presentations. Brandi S. Niemeier, Joel M. Hektner, Donna J. Terbizan will present "Association Between Young Adults and Their Parents Daily Caloric Intake." John Schuna, Gary Liguori, Jared Tucker and Arupendra Mozumdar will present "No Difference in Daily Physical Activity Between Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadets and Non-Cadets." Jared M. Tucker, Gregory J. Welk and Nicholas Beyler will present "Physical Activity and The Metabolic Syndrome in US Adults: Comparison Between Self-report and Accelerometry." Trista Manikowske, Natalie Ching, Jared Tucker, Donna Terbizan and Gary Liguori will present "Differences In Fitness and Body Composition Between New and Returning ROTC Cadets." Bryan Christensen, Sherri Stastny, Sarah Hilgers, Hidafa Okamatsu, Trista Manikowske, Lindsay Youd and Joseph Champa will present "Does Creatine Supplementation Along With a Resistance Training Program Improve Strength in Women?" Sarah Hilgers, John Schuna Jr., Trista Manikowske, Jared Tucker, Donna Terbizan, Bryan Christensen and Gary Liguori will present "Validity of U.S. Department of Defense Circumference Equation in Detecting Body Composition Change." Donna J. Terbizan, Meredith Wagner, Trista Manikowske, Yeong Rhee, Jared Tucker, Bryan Christensen and Ardith Brunt will present "Blood Parameters Comparison Using the Cholestech LDX® System and a Standard Clinical Laboratory Assay Technique."

Jeremiah Moen, a doctoral graduate, and Bryan Christensen, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, presented "Hunting for Health" at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance national conference in San Diego. The presentation was based on Moen's dissertation research, which involved tracking the physical activity of 22 deer hunters in North Dakota with accelerometers. The hunters were found to accumulate almost three times the amount of minimal physical activity recommended by professional organizations. For example, the deer hunters walked an average of more than 12 miles during a weekend of hunting.

NDSU Professor Publishes Research About Writers and Translators | 6/29/2011

June 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Bruce Maylath, professor of English at NDSU, published the article, "Field Convergence Between Technical Writers and Technical Translators," in the June issue of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers-Transactions in Professional Communication. The article was co-written with Marusca Gnecchi of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, Birthe Mousten of Denmark's Aarhus University, Federica Scarpa of Italy's University of Trieste and Sonia Vandepitte of Belgium's University College Ghent.

It includes results from a first-of-its-kind survey, providing evidence that technical writers and translators in both North America and Europe are seeking cross training in each other's fields. Results suggest they are motivated by the desire to capture the work, and pay, of the full spectrum of technical documentation. Earlier such work was distinctly divided between writers at the first stage of development and translators at the second.

IEEE-Transactions in Professional Communication is a quarterly journal devoted to applied research on professional communication, including, but not limited to, technical and business communication. It is peer-reviewed by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. For more information about the journal, visit http://ewh.ieee.org/soc/pcs/?q=node/24.

NDSU’s Jackson Presents at Economic Theory Meeting | 6/29/2011

June 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Jeremy Jackson, assistant professor of agribusiness and applied economics, presented the paper, "Dynamic Technological Innovation With Dual Quality Ladders," at the Association for Public Economic Theory meeting at Indiana University, Bloomington, on June 3.

The paper was co-written with Jason Smith, from the finance department at the University of Kentucky.

The authors developed a dynamic game theoretic model of innovation whereby intellectual property rights allow the product of one firm to be licensed for use in the research activities of another competing firm. Firms have an incentive to sell a license for research use as it increases immediate profits. However, selling the license to a competitor also increases the probability that the competitor will have a technological innovation, which will hurt profitability in the future. Jackson and Smith show that in equilibrium, research licenses will be priced so that firms purchase fewer licenses than what is socially optimal.

NDSU Animal Sciences Professor Presents in Poland | 6/29/2011
 

June 29, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Anna Grazul-Bilska, professor of animal sciences at NDSU, was invited to present six lectures and nine seminars at a workshop at the College of Biological Sciences at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland, from May 25 to June 1.

The program, "Expanding and improving educational offers addressed to persons outside the university and increasing the quality of teaching and competence of the academic community," was carried out under the operational program, "Human Capital," and co-financed by the European Union under the European Social Fund.

NDSU Graduate Student Receives Fellowships | 6/27/2011

June 27, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Anoklase Jean-Luc Ayitou, a fourth-year chemistry and biochemistry graduate student at NDSU, recently received two fellowships.

Ayitou received the Carl Storm Underrepresented Minorities Fellowship, which helps eligible minority students, faculty and scientists attend the Gordon Research Conference in Photochemistry scheduled for this summer. The awardees receive $600 to subsidize the cost to attend the conference. The Carl Storm Underrepresented Minority Fellowship Program was established by the Gordon Research Conference board of trustees to honor Director Emeritus Carl Storm's years of service to the conference and to support his commitment to increasing diversity at the Gordon Research Conferences. Ayitou was selected for the fellowship by organizers of the 2011 Gordon Research Conference.

Ayitou also received the Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline Fellowship. The award was presented to Ayitou at the 38th annual conference of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers held April 18-22 in Houston. The fellowship was established in memory of Lendon N. Pridgen, a synthetic organic chemist, to recognize African-American students in their third or fourth year of graduate study and majoring in synthetic organic chemistry. Ayitou's doctoral work involves the use of molecular chirality to control stereoselection in light initiated chemical transformations to generate enantiopure molecular building blocks.

Wu Lab at NDSU to Publish Paper in Scientific Online Journal | 6/27/2011

June 27, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences in the Wu lab, co-wrote the article, "Cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing PDGFR." It will be published by PLoS ONE, an online journal that highlights original research from all disciplines within science and medicine.

According to the authors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) are linked to an array of human malignancies, including medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor affecting children. Although significant progress in medulloblastoma biology and therapeutics has been achieved during the past decades, it remains a formidable challenge to physicians and researchers. Therefore, novel inhibitors targeting platelet-derived growth factor receptors signaling pathway may offer great promise for the treatment of medulloblastoma. In the current study, the researchers found that cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptors and investigated the mechanisms of cambogin in Daoy medulloblastoma cells.

"Cambogin was isolated from Garcinia cowa, a tropical subcanopy climax tree indigenous to monsoon rain forests in southwest Asia with cooling and detoxification functions. Our previous study has demonstrated that a xanthone derivate dulxanthone A isolated from G. Cowa induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via up-regulation of p53 through mitochondrial pathway in HepG2 cells. Here, we show that cambogin triggers significant S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via down regulation of cyclin A and E, and activation of caspases. More importantly, further mechanistic studies demonstrated that cambogin inhibits PDGFR signaling in Daoy and genetically defined mouse embryo fibroblast cell lines. Our findings may provide a novel approach by targeting PDGFR signaling against medulloblastoma," senior author Wu said.

The first author for the paper is Ze Tian, Wu's first postdoctoral research fellow, now a faculty member at Harvard Medical School. Other collaborators include Jie Shen, Peigen Xiao and Junshan Yang from Peking Union Medical College and Hetian Lei, Andrius Kazlauskas and Isaac Kohane from Harvard Medical School.

Part of the research received support from the Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence grant NIH P20 RR020151 from the National Center for Research Resources. Wu was offered a pilot project grant from the NDSU Center for Visual and Cognitive Neuroscience a few months ago.

To view the paper, visit www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0021370

NDSU Laboratory Manager Participates in Math and Science Partnership Grant Institute | 6/27/2011

June 27, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Jayma Moore, laboratory manager of the Electron Microscopy Center at NDSU, was an invited instructor for the Math and Science Partnership Grant Institute at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, N.D., held June 9-10.

The Institute was formed to improve mathematics and science proficiency at Native American schools in North Dakota. Built on a partnership between Valley City State University, Sitting Bull College and five state K-12 schools, it is funded by a 2010 grant from the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction. The summer professional-development institute was intended to equip K-12 teachers at Native American schools with the latest trends and research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

Moore presented "Seeing is Believing," engaging 53 teachers of Native American students in Internet operation of the Microscopy Center's JEOL JSM-6490LV scanning electron microscope. The microscope can be used remotely in any Internet-equipped classroom worldwide to stimulate student interest or support curriculum. Workshop participants investigated 19 samples, ranging from insects to computer chips, including culturally relevant items like a feather (Lakota, wiyaka) and wing scales from a butterfly (kimi mila).

According to Linda Difference Cloud-Jones, education instructor at Sitting Bull College, "This 'participation with the natural world' aspect is one essential difference between Native and Western science ... the mere act of choosing to observe a particular occurrence or object over another is subjective." Native science traditionally has been known for its qualitative methods, in contrast to the strict quantitative analysis of today's Western science.

Other workshop presenters were from the departments of STEM Education and Elementary Education at Valley City State University; the Great Plains STEM Education Center; the Prairie Waters Education and Research Center; Sitting Bull College math, science and elementary education; the North Dakota State College of Science nanoscience program; and private corporations with expertise in Geographic Information Systems and Global Positioning Systems instruction.

The Electron Microscopy Center is an NDSU service facility that annually provides comprehensive imaging and analysis services to more than 100 faculty and student researchers from more than 20 departments and industry.

Book by NDSU Professor Examines Role of Children in War and Propaganda | 6/14/2011

June 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – A new book titled “Children, War and Propaganda” examines wartime contributions of U.S. children in World War I and World War II. Author Ross Collins, Ph.D., communication professor at North Dakota State University, researched how groups have integrated children into the war experience through propaganda.

“Modern propaganda in advertising, magazine and other venues helped to draw children into those wars,” notes Collins, who evaluated hundreds of historical images and documents in researching the book. “A variety of authorities participated in the propaganda, in the school, on the playground, at work or at home. They promoted military ideals and activities in hopes these might reduce fear, build character, prepare for service, and even tangibly help the war effort. In doing so, authorities brought war themes to children on a day-to-day basis, a militarization of American childhood.”

As the World Wars changed societies in many ways, Collins notes that they also changed expectations for children during wartime. In war on an immense, worldwide scale, everyone worked, including children of all ages.

In a slide show accompanying the book, images of wartime in children’s magazines such as The American Boy, or ads for toys, bikes and fishing poles, carried messages of children’s role in helping the war effort.

No effort was too small, according to Collins. Children in World War I were asked to collect fruit pits and nutshells that were burned into charcoal for gas mask filters. Children in World War II were asked to collect milkweed pods. The milkweed silk served as substitute kapok in life preservers.

In this historical perspective, Collins examines how patriotism was used as a method to build what was perceived as the ideal child who was skilled, physically fit, civic minded, with an enhanced moral character. The book discusses what children were told, what they were expected to do, and how they responded.

Collins notes that in the beginning of the 21st century, war was not only fought for children, but by children. He raises the provocative thought that such a progression seemed logical after it became acceptable to recruit children for wartime needs in World War I and World War II.

An excerpt of the book is available at http://www.childrenwarandpropaganda.com/excerpt.html

Ross F. Collins, Children, War and Propaganda. New York: Peter Lang, 2011. ISBN 978-1-4331-0382-7. The book is part of the Mediating American History series, aimed at scholars and students and edited by David A. Copeland. The series includes a diverse range of works dealing with the mass media and its relationship to society.

Collins earned his doctorate in history from the University of Cambridge, England. He has published three books and many articles on the history of World War I, France and the American frontier.

More information at http://www.childrenwarandpropaganda.com/

NDSU Serves as Hub for STEM Education Research | 6/10/2011

June 10, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – A novel research area is gaining momentum among American scientists and mathematicians and NDSU is a driving force behind it. It's the study of how people teach and learn areas of science and mathematics. Scientists and mathematicians are using their training to apply research methodologies, commonly associated with cognitive science and education, to better understand the complex system of how students learn subjects like physics, biology, chemistry, biochemistry and mathematics. Studies range from analyzing students' ability to transfer calculus skills to the physics classroom, to more broadly looking at how students develop and articulate hypotheses to examining curriculum and assessment.

The area is called Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education research, also known as discipline-based education research. NDSU is one of the first universities in the nation to offer a graduate program in STEM education. It embraced the emerging field in 2007 by adding three tenure-track positions and establishing an interdisciplinary doctoral program between the College of Science and Mathematics and the School of Education.

For both students and faculty, an attractive feature of NDSU's program is the network of faculty. Mila Kryjevskaia, assistant professor of physics, says the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues from other departments in an interdisciplinary group is rare. "Quite often only one faculty does this type of research in the entire department or maybe in the entire college," she said. "We have a unique situation that we have many faculty in the College of Science and Mathematics who do discipline-based research in education."

Other universities recognize the uniqueness of NDSU's program. At a recent biology education research conference, some NDSU faculty were repeatedly asked, "What's going on at NDSU that is putting you on the map in terms of the place to be?"

"It comes down to a lot of vision at the college level. This was a broad umbrella saying, 'Yes, this is important,' " said Jennifer Momsen, assistant professor of biology. "Why not have North Dakota be at the forefront of it if we can?"

NDSU Graduate Students Examine Local Sodium-Affected Soils | 6/10/2011

June 10, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – That white, powder-like substance you've noticed in recent years in some North Dakota ditches and fields is salt. And it's more and more on the minds of agricultural producers.

"Our wet, climatic cycle since 1993 has really had a significant impact on salt migration in landscapes," explained David Hopkins, associate professor of soil science at NDSU. "Part of the reason we are seeing more salts is as the groundwater rose regionally, salts moved both vertically and laterally. Previously, the salts were in the sub-soils, sequestered by long-term soil genesis."

Growers keep a vigilant eye on their fields because salinity or sodicity can hamper plant growth. It causes crops to appear water-stressed because a high salt content can prevent their ability to absorb water from the soil. Sodium salts can also cause clay dispersion, which impairs soil physical condition and reduces hydraulic conductivity.

"A change in salinity is a complicated, long-term process that is important to watch," said Hopkins, who wants his graduate students to have a first-hand look at the issue.

From September through November, a group of students taking a Soils 644 class called Soil Genesis and Survey, did a variety of tests on farmland near Casselton, N.D. They examined a heavy clay, sodium-affected soil called Nahon, which can be found on about 100,000 acres in North Dakota and South Dakota.

"We went to look at salinity and sodicity on their own merits from a soil classification perspective, and then we learned the producers were considering tile drainage," Hopkins said. "So, our opportunity to evaluate deep-soil chemistry had even more significance than typically."

The students investigated soil chemistry, utilizing a Veris Technologies cart to test for soil electrical conductivity. They conducted surveys, studied the morphology of the soil, took both shallow and deep salinity readings and performed laboratory analysis. "It was an opportunity for graduate students to be outdoors, in the field. It was a hands-on experience, rather than writing a paper," said Hopkins, who plans to publish results with the students, specifically in the popular press and available to area producers.

"I embraced the opportunity to get out and get field experience," said graduate student Leif Sande. "It was an awesome opportunity, especially if the work we did can actually be used and applied. Field experience and working on an actual project proved extremely valuable."

Hopkins has some general advice for farmers who are considering a field drainage plan. "Salts are not created equal, and it is important to test subsoil chemistry in the region where the tile would be placed. If sodium levels are too high, dispersion processes may occur over time that can reduce flow to the tile," Hopkins said. "Some relatively simple soil tests can indicate what the chemistry is."

NDSU Researchers Publish Paper on Brain Tumor Cells | 6/8/2011

June 8, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – A group of NDSU researchers will have their paper on brain tumor cells published in the interdisciplinary journal, Current Molecular Medicine.

Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU; Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences; Kruttika Bhat, doctoral student in Wu's lab; Matthew Doucette, Pharm D. student; and Shuang Zhou, doctoral student in Wu's lab, co-wrote, "Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) sensitizes brain tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis."

The group investigated whether the addition of DHA, a nutritionally important n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, modulated the sensitivity of brain tumor cells to the anticancer drug, etoposide (VP16). Medulloblastoma (MB) cell lines, Daoy and D283, and glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, U138 and U87, were exposed to DHA or VP16 as single agents or in combination. The effects on cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis were determined by using MTS and Hoechest 33342/PI double staining. U87 and U138 cells were found to be refractory to addition of DHA and VP16 while the two MB cell lines showed high sensitivity. DHA or VP16 added alone showed little effect on cell proliferation or death in either MB or GBM cell lines while pretreatment with DHA enhanced responsiveness to VP16 in MB cell lines. To understand the mechanisms by which combined DHA and VP16 affected MB cells, pathway specific oligo array analyses were performed to dissect possible signaling pathways involved. Addition of DHA and VP16, in comparison to VP16 added alone, resulted in marked suppression in the expression of several genes involved in DNA damage repair, cell proliferation, survival, invasion and angiogenesis, including, respectively, PRKDC, Survivin, PIK3R1, MAPK14, NFkappaB1, NFkappaBIA, BCL2, CD44 and MAT1.

"These results suggest that effects of DHA and VP16 in brain tumor cells are mediated at least in part by down regulation of events involved in DNA repair and the PI3K/MAPK signaling pathways, and raise the possibility that brain tumors genotypically mimicked by MB cells may benefit from therapies combining VP16 with DHA," said the senior author Wu. They have collaborated with Steven Qian and Benedict Law, assistant professors at NDSU. Other collaborators include Yan Gu, doctoral student in Qian's lab; Xinli Liu, assistant professor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; Eric Wong, associate professor at Harvard Medical School; Jing X. Kang, professor at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School; and Tze-chen Hsieh, research associate professor at New York Medical College.

Current Molecular Medicine is an interdisciplinary journal focused on providing current and comprehensive reviews and original research articles on fundamental molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, the development of molecular-diagnosis and/or novel approaches to rational treatment. Its current impact factor is 5.096, ranking 11th of 92 medicine, research and experimental journals, according to its website, www.benthamscience.com/cmm/index.htm.

Wu's laboratory research interests include tumor therapeutic targets, drug discovery and biomarkers. Wu joined NDSU in December 2008. Prior to joining NDSU, Wu worked at Harvard University for more than 10 years. Wu was a faculty member at Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard University. Concurrently, Wu has been a special professor at the Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing since 2007. Since he joined NDSU, his lab has published or submitted more than 20 manuscripts in high-tier journals.

Article Published on College Student Helping Behavior | 6/1/2011

June 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Laura Oster-Aaland, director of orientation and student success at NDSU; Kevin Thompson, professor and head of the criminal justice and political science department; and Myron Eighmy, professor and coordinator of educational doctoral programs, published a peer-reviewed article in the June issue of Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice.

The article analyzed the impact of a medical amnesty policy and an online alcohol poisoning video on college students' intentions to seek help when witnessing alcohol poisoning symptoms. Findings provide support for education and policy in influencing college students' intentions to seek help. Practical implications are provided for student affairs administrators who may be considering such policies.

NDSU Researchers Receive Grants for Agricultural Projects | 6/1/2011

June 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Three NDSU researchers have been awarded grants from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program.

Erin Burns, an NDSU graduate student in plant sciences, was awarded a $10,000 graduate student grant for the project "Integration of Biological Control and Native Cover Crops for Canada Thistle Control." Doug Landblom, associate center specialist at the Dickinson Research Extension Center, was awarded a $199,736 research and education grant for the project "Increasing Sustainability of Livestock Production of the Northern Great Plains." Xinhua Jia, assistant professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering at NDSU, was awarded a $199,706 research and education grant for the project "Effect of Optimal Water Management for Sustainable and Profitable Crop Production and Improvement of Water Quality in Red River Valley."

Since 1988, the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program has helped advance farming systems that are profitable, environmentally sound and good for communities. It is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Paper Published About Ethanol Industry's Impact on Roads | 6/1/2011

June 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – "Impacts of ethanol plants on highway networks" was published in the spring issue of the Journal of Transport and Land Use. It was written by Alan Dybing and Denver Tolliver, both of Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, and Subhro MItra, formerly of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute and now at the University of North Texas at Dallas.

The paper describes the impacts of the ethanol industry on existing highway infrastructure in the vicinity of an ethanol production plant. Based on existing pavement condition and the incremental traffic changes, the funds required to maintain the affected roads at their present service levels are quantified.

The article can be found at www.jtlu.org/index.php/jtlu. The journal is housed at the University of Minnesota and sponsored by the Center for Transportation Studies.

NDSU Faculty Honored at College Awards Ceremony | 6/1/2011

June 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Two faculty members were recognized at the annual NDSU College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Awards Luncheon on May 13.

Amy Rupiper Taggart, associate professor of English at NDSU, received the Service Award. Rupiper Taggart began her career at NDSU in 2002. One of her nominators wrote, "Our department nominated Amy because it was obvious that her work to create and then lead the Faculty Senate was timely and an important service. Another reason is that Amy directs the First-Year Writing Program, a significant service contribution that affects almost every student on campus."

Carol Archbold, associate professor of criminal justice and political science at NDSU, received the Research Award. Archbold began her career at NDSU in 2005.

"Dr. Archbold has been extremely successful in bridging the gap between the academic and the practitioner. This is quite difficult in any academic field, but imperative in one like criminal justice in which the practical implications are seen as more important," Thomas Ambrosio wrote in his nomination letter. A different nominator also mentioned Archbold's ability to reach a broader audience. "Her service to the community is particularly important, as communicating scholarly knowledge to non-academics, in situations where it may influence policy and practice in the field, is not something that every professor can do."

NDSU Graduate Researcher Receives NSF Fellowship | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Dereck Stonefish, a first-year graduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences at North Dakota State University, has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. In awarding the fellowship, the National Science Foundation (NSF) noted that Stonefish’s selection “was based on your outstanding abilities and accomplishments, as well as your potential to contribute to strengthening the vitality of the U.S. science and engineering enterprise.”

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to Stonefish, which is awarded over a three-year period from 2011 to 2014, carries a total award of $151,500 for research related expenses.

Stonefish, who is pursuing a doctorate degree in zoology, is conducting research on the migratory ecology of red-winged blackbirds and yellow-headed blackbirds that are summer residents in North Dakota.  He is using geo-locators to track the movements of these birds from North Dakota to their wintering grounds and then back to North Dakota.  “His project not only will provide major insights into the migratory ecology of these species, but the information will also be used to assess how impacts of global climate change may affect migration of these birds,” said Dr. Erin Gillam, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Stonefish’s advisor at NDSU. Stonefish conducts his field research in the prairie pothole region of North Dakota.

Stonefish previously received a Graduate Student Research Assistantship Native American pilot project award in 2010 from the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR).  He is a graduate of Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, N.D. Stonefish is one of only four tribal college graduates in the U.S. to receive a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship since 2006. The National Science Foundations’s Tribal Colleges and Universities Program assists eligible institutions to prepare students in science, technology, engineering and math fields. Stonefish previously participated in the Nurturing American Tribal Undergraduate Research and Education (NATURE) program sponsored by ND EPSCoR.

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship program is among the most competitive programs in the country, notes Gillam, whose research on the behavioral ecology of animals has been published in Proceedings of Royal Society B, New Scientist, Journal of Animal Behavior, Journal of Mammology, and the New York Times.

Stonefish says he is happy, humbled and very grateful to be given such an opportunity afforded by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Stonefish is the son of Nancy and Basil Summers, Victor and Marcia Brave Thunder and Kathy Bailey, Standing Rock, N.D.

The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in the U.S. and abroad.

Stonefish is also the fourth graduate student at NDSU to receive a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Anoklase Ayitou, a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, received a fellowship in 2010, advised by Professor Sivaguru Jayaraman, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award recipient, as well as a recipient of the 2010 Swiss Chemical Society’s Grammaticakis-Neumann Prize.

Darya Zabelina, who received her master’s and bachelor’s degrees from NDSU in psychology, received her NSF Graduate Research Fellowship in 2009, advised by Dr. Michael D. Robinson. Tara Rheault also received an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (1997-2000) and conducted research as a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry with Dr. Mukund Sibi, University Distinguished Professor, director of the Center for Protease Research at NDSU and recipient of the American Chemical Society’s Arthur S. Cope Scholar Award.

NDSU Graduate Students Recognized for Stellar Performance | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The NDSU College of Engineering and Architecture recognized two graduate students for outstanding performance at an awards ceremony in April.

Mohsen Hamidi, an industrial and manufacturing engineering doctoral student, received the Graduate Student Teacher of the Year award and Mike Fuqua, a mechanical engineering doctoral student, received the Graduate Student Researcher of the Year award.

Hamidi has taught Engineering Economy (a class with enrollment routinely more than 100 students) since fall 2008. He was nominated by his adviser, Kambiz Farahmand, professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering.

Fuqua serves as a research assistant for his adviser, Chad Ulven, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, developing renewable composite materials. His research interests include polymer composite material design and manufacturing, biobased material development and polymer composite mechanics.

NDSU Students and Faculty Showcase Research  | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The NDSU College of Human Development and Education hosted its fifth annual HDE Research Showcase on Wednesday, April 20, in the Memorial Union Prairie Rose room. Students and faculty presented 65 research posters in the largest showcase to date. Several awards were presented to graduate and undergraduate students for their work.

Michele Reid received the Student's Choice award for her project titled "University Library Public Spaces Users: A Qualitative Study." The HDE Graduate Student Advisory Council presented the award. The People's Choice Award for favorite poster went to Jena Blegan and Rebecca Woods for their research, "Infants and Malleable Objects: Is Shape a Reliable Feature?" Showcase attendees voted for the award. Blegan and Woods also won the Research Showcase Poster Award for undergraduate students. Honorable mention went to Angie Reule and Julie Garden-Robinson for their project, "Effectiveness of Health-Intervention Tools Through Online Messages."

The graduate Research Showcase Poster Award went to Mallary Scheafer and Elizabeth Bodgett-Salafia for "The Effects of Teasing by Family Members on Adolescents' Body Image."  Two projects received honorable mention in this category; Anthony Randles, Anita Gust and Gary Liguori for "Assessing Healthful Food Choices and Nutritional Information on Kid's Restaurant Menus" and Jessica Lemer, Beth Blodgett-Salafia and Kristen Benson for "Women's Body Image, Attitudes and Sexual Frequency: A Mediation Analysis."

Both the undergraduate and graduate Research Showcase Poster Awards were determined by The College Research Committee. A list of the showcase posters is available at  www.ndsu.edu/hde/research/hde_research_showcase/2011_showcase_listing.

NDSU Faculty Receives Grant from 3M | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Andriy Voronov, NDSU assistant professor of coatings and polymeric materials, received a $15,000 3M Non-tenured Faculty Grant for his research titled, "Covalent grafting of polymeric hydrogels to polymeric substrates activated by functional polyperoxides."

The award was administered by 3M's Research and Development in partnership with the Corporate Giving Program. It recognizes outstanding new faculty for the quality and pertinence of research and is intended to help them achieve tenure, remain in their teaching position and conduct research. The grant may be renewed for up to three years.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish and Present | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Several NDSU College of Human Development and Education faculty members and students gave presentations and had research published. John Schuna, a doctoral student in wellness, was awarded a Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for the 2011-12 academic year.  Michael Siggerud published an article, " Superintendent Search Tips from the Pros," in the March-April volume of the Minnesota School Board Journal. The article was based on his dissertation work in the Education Doctorate Program. Professor emeritus Ronald Stammen was his adviser.

David Silkenat, assistant professor in the NDSU School of Education, had an article, "'In Good Hands, in a Safe Place: Female Academies in Confederate North Carolina," published in the January issue of the North Carolina Historical Review.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, received the Gold Medal of Honor from the International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance in recognition for his contributions, merit, visionary leadership and for promotion of the quality and values of health, physical education, recreation, sport and dance education, science and programs. Strand received the award at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance annual conference in San Diego March 29-April 1.

Desiree Tande and Brandi Niemeier, NDSU doctoral graduates; Joyce Hwang, assistant professor at the University of Hawaii; Sherri Stastny, NDSU assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences; and Joel Hektner, NDSU associate professor of human development and family sciences, had an abstract peer reviewed for the 2011 Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. It was selected for a poster session in San Diego for the American Dietetic Association in September. The presentation title is "BMI Percentile Is Related to Learning Outcomes Among Preschool Children Following Exposure to Additional Fruits and Vegetables at Meals and Snacks in Pilot Study."

Anita Welch, assistant professor in the NDSU School of Education, has had papers accepted in three conferences. The papers are all collaborative efforts with professors from NDSU and around the world. "High School Robotics Competition: Building More than Robots" was presented at The American Evaluation Association Conference in Anaheim, Calif. "A Cross-Cultural Validation of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focuses Learning Environment Inventory" was presented at the International Conference on Education and Educational Psychology in Istanbul, Turkey. "Technology as a Three-legged Stool for International Collaboration and Research" was presented by Claudette Peterson at EDULEARN11 International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies in Barcelona, Spain.

Several awards were presented at the North Dakota Dietetics state meeting. Vel Rae Burkholder, NDSU professor emeritus of dietetics, received the 50-year American Dietetic Association membership award.  Sherri Nordstrom Stastny, NDSU assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, received the outstanding dietetic educator award. Joan Nagel, a senior in the Coordinated Program at NDSU, was named the outstanding dietetic student.  Kristen Liebl was named the outstanding young dietitian of the year. She is a graduate of the NDSU dietetics program and works as a community dietitian at Sanford Health in Fargo. Char Herr was named the outstanding dietitian of the year. Herr graduated from NDSU's dietetics program and is program manager for the Midwest Dairy Association. Stephanie Bechtel, junior in the Coordinated Dietetics Program at NDSU, was the scholarship recipient.

Eating for Your Eyes II: Diabetic Retinopathy, a project developed in collaboration with the North Dakota Optometric Association and NDSU has been awarded $10,000 by Healthy Vision Community Awards. Project directors are Nancy Kopp, executive director of the North Dakota Optometric Association and Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise science at NDSU, in collaboration with Julie Garden-Robinson from NDSU Extension. Healthy Vision Community Awards are sponsored by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to make a difference in communities across the nation by supporting grassroots eye health education.

Project Promotes Green Research and Environmentalism | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU students in a communication class have completed a project they hope will promote green research and environmentalism on campus. The class, Research for Strategic Communication taught by Elizabeth Crisp Crawford, developed a 44-page publication called "NDSU: Sustainable University: 2011 Sustainability Review." The project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Communication and the College of Engineering and Architecture.

The publication is intended to "increase awareness in our community about current energy practices, while promoting positive change to improve energy use. Starting a movement toward sustainability begins at NDSU with education, awareness and research."

Ten students were contributing writers for the project. Articles include "NDSU Students Leaving Green Footprints," "Taxes: How to Catch a Break," "Catch-22: A Tale of Two Business Owners" and "Re-Energizing Residence Life." Topics range from the Red River Valley Research Corridor to innovator profiles to energy saving tips.

Human Development Research at NDSU | 5/26/2011

May 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Several College of Human Development and Education faculty members and students recently gave presentations and had research published.

Amelia Asperin, NDSU assistant professor of apparel, design and hospitality management, was elected West-Midwest Regional Director for the Foodservice Systems Management Educational Council. The council's members are foodservice and dietetic educators and practitioners committed to improving research, education and practice in foodservice management.  

Amy Beutler, Desiree Tande and others had their article, "Caffeinated Energy Drinks: Potential Benefits and Health Risks," published in published in SCAN's Pulse. SCAN stands for Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition and is a dietetic practice group of the American Dietetic Association. Beutler and Tande completed their master's degree and doctorate, respectively, in the Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences.

Beth Blodgett Salafia and Kristen Benson, both NDSU assistant professors in human development and family sciences, presented a poster, "The roles of dating status and BMI in late adolescent girls' body image and sexuality," at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development in Montreal in April.

Mari Borr, assistant professor in the NDSU School of Education, was named as an honorary member of the North Dakota Family, Career and Community Leaders of America at the North Dakota Family Career and Community Leaders of America state convention on April 12.

Jodi Burrer and Abby Milton, graduate students in the NDSU Master of Athletic Training program, had a peer-reviewed abstract selected for a poster presentation at the 2011 National Athletic Trainers' Association annual meeting and clinical symposia in New Orleans in June.

Virginia Clark Johnson, dean of the NDSU College of Human Development and Education, and colleagues from West Virginia University, University of Iowa and Manhattanville College, had their manuscript, "Emerging characteristics of education deans' collaborative leadership," selected for publication in the Academic Leadership Online Journal.

Joe Deutsch, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was named the Midwest Networks of the National Recreation and Parks Association 2011 Outstanding Young Professional.

Brenda Hall, associate professor of education, and Jamie Anderson, counseling master's degree student at NDSU, presented at the National Youth-At-Risk Conference March 6-9 in Savannah, Ga. During their presentation, "Developing Positive Teen Dating Identities: A Group Counseling Model for Adolescent Males," they shared information from their research related to intimate partner violence prevention.

Joel Hektner, NDSU associate professor of human development and family sciences, led a symposium titled "Promoting social-emotional development and preventing adjustment problems in middle childhood" at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development in Montreal in March. He also had a paper in the symposium, "Bringing the rejected and rejecters together: Promoting peer acceptance and social competence in Early Risers Skills for Success."

Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor in the NDSU School of Education, presented "A Great Conversation with Jamaica Kincaid" on April 1 in Grand Forks, N.D., as part of the 42nd annual UND Writers Conference. At another presentation, Lajimodiere discussed her research related to Native American boarding schools. Her presentation was titled "Kill the Indian, Save the Man."

Marvin D. LeNoue, NDSU doctoral candidate, and his adviser, Ronald Stammen, professor emeritus, School of Education, had a peer-reviewed manuscript, "Blending In: Moving Beyond Categories in Digitally-Mediated Learning," published as Chapter XII in the book, "Blended Learning Across Disciplines: Models for Implementation."

Gary Liguori, NDSU assistant professor of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences; Arupendra Mozumdar, health, nutrition and exercise sciences research associate; and Katrina DuBose, East Carolina University, had their manuscript, "Occupational physical activity and risk of coronary heart disease among active and non-active working-women of North Dakota: A Go Red North Dakota study," accepted into Anthropologischer Anzeiger, an English language journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology.

Erika Offerdahl, NDSU assistant professor of chemistry/biochemistry and education, had her National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates proposal, "Research on the Prairies: Undergraduate Training in the Molecular Sciences," recommended for funding of $330,000 for three years. Offerdahl is principal investigator and Mukund Sibi is co-principal investigator.

WooMi Phillips, assistant professor; Kara Wolfe, associate professor; and Amelia Asperin, assistant professor; all in the NDSU apparel, design and hospitality management department, had their research presentation, "Exploring Food Neophobia and Perceptions of Ethnic Foods: The Case of Chinese and Thai Cuisines," accepted for the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education conference in Denver July 27-30.

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family sciences at NDSU, presented "Intergenerational Transmission: Links Between Young Adult Gambling and Perceived Grandparent Gambling Attitudes and Behaviors" and "Socialization of the Importance of Religion and Prosocial Behaviors Across Two Cultures" at the Society for Research in Child Development biennial meeting in Montreal.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of education/English, and local teachers Alissa Helm and Karen Taylor, represented the Red River Valley Writing Project at the spring meeting of the National Writing Project in Washington, D.C., March 30-April 1.

Governor Dalrymple Signs Bills That Include Research Funding | 5/16/2011

May 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple participated in a bill signing ceremony on May 16 at NDSU, signing Senate and House bills that fund the North Dakota Department of Commerce budget, including Centers of Excellence programs.

Dalrymple signed the bills during a ceremony at the NDSU Research & Technology Park. Joining Dalrymple for the event were area legislators, NDSU President Dean Bresciani, UND President Robert Kelley, and business and education leaders.

“This legislation will create continued opportunities for our young people by advancing our targeted economic development strategies, expanding the success of our Centers of Excellence program and promoting private investment in our companies,” said Dalrymple.

President Bresciani said the investment in research and economic development provides enhanced opportunities for students, as well as for the state of North Dakota. He noted investments in the state’s research universities result in further advancement of the state.

The legislation includes $15.5 million in funding for Centers of Research Excellence and other similar programs, including workforce enhancement grants, technology-based entrpreneurship grants, and the newly-created Small Business Technology Investment Program.

Dalrymple also signed a House bill that enhances North Dakota’s angel fund investment tax credit, providing incentives to promote nationwide, private-sector investment in the state’s angel fund enterprises.

State Senator Tony Grindberg, executive director of the NDSU Research & Technology Park noted that the state’s investment in entrepreneurship enhances North Dakota’s future.

David Batcheller, COO of Appareo Systems which is located in the Park, said that the company, which began with just a few employees in NDSU’s Research 1 in 2001, was last year named the fastest growing private engineering company in the U.S. by Inc. magazine. Appareo now occupies the Batcheller Technology Center building in the NDSU Research & Technology Park.

North Dakota’s Centers of Excellence program was established in 2005, and was built on the concept of partnering the research capacities found in the state’s colleges and universities with private-sector companies to generate jobs and new business opportunities. As of June 30, 2010, $26.2 million in state funds have been leveraged for an estimated total economic impact of $406.5 million to North Dakota’s economy, according to figures provided by the North Dakota Commerce Department.

Nanomaterials Forum to be Held at NDSU on June 9 | 5/16/2011

May 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — North Dakota State University will be the site of the Materials and Nanotechnology Forum to be held on Thursday, June 9 at NDSU’s Reineke Fine Arts Center at the corner of Bolley Drive and Twelfth Avenue North, Fargo. Presenters from NDSU, Texas A&M University and Tecton Products are participating.

Visit http://www.ndsu.edu/materials_nanotechnology/news_and_events/ for a complete schedule of events and scientific abstracts. There are no fees for the event and it is open to corporate and university researchers and students in materials and nanotechnology. More than 25 presentations and poster sessions are scheduled for the Forum to be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursday, June 9.
 
“The goal of the Forum is provide researchers in materials and nanotechnology at NDSU a venue to communicate with each other and initiate larger, higher impact collaborations,” said Dr. Erik Hobbie, organizer of the event.

For a complete list of presenters and abstracts, go to http://www.ndsu.edu/materials_nanotechnology/news_and_events/

Erik Hobbie serves as director of NDSU’s Materials and Nanotechnology graduate program that offers students a unique opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary research. It is the only program of its kind in North Dakota.
 
NDSU faculty from chemistry, civil engineering, coatings and polymeric materials, mechanical engineering, physics, and pharmaceutical sciences contribute to the Materials and Nanotechnology program. Researchers in the program also collaborate with the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering at NDSU. Hobbie previously served as a senior scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Contact: Erik Hobbie, erik.hobbie@ndsu.edu 701-231-7049

NDSU Marketing Assistant Professor's Manuscript Accepted to Journal | 5/13/2011

May 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Michael T. Krush, assistant professor of marketing at NDSU, co-wrote the manuscript, "Understanding the mechanism linking interpersonal traits to prosocial behaviors among salespeople: Lessons from India," which has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing.

Factors such as globalization and market size have made India a major consideration for multinational firms and their sales forces. Despite the appeal of the market, the majority of theories and empirical studies within sales have been based on Western thought and within a Western context. This study addresses the issue of what interpersonal traits impel outcomes and behaviors of Indian salespeople.

Specifically, the study examined two traits, empathy proneness and guilt proneness. The results suggest an interplay between interpersonal traits and prosocial sales behaviors. Empathy proneness was positively related to helping behaviors targeted at other salespeople. Guilt proneness was positively associated with behaviors targeted at customers and negatively associated with behaviors targeted at colleagues. The research suggests that a salesperson's capacity for empathy does not always translate into customer-based behaviors within an Indian sales force. Hence, sales training and other interventions targeted toward building empathy may actually impact behaviors between salespeople versus the interface between the salesperson and customer.

NDSU Faculty Paper Accepted to European Journal of Pharmacology | 5/13/2011

May 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "β2-adrenoceptor blocker synergizes with gemcitabine to inhibit the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells via apoptosis induction," which will be published by the European Journal of Pharmacology.
 
According to the authors, stimulation of β2-adrenoceptor, which is major mediator for chronic stress-induced cancers, has been associated with the progression in the number of cancer cells. This includes pancreatic cancer, which remains one of the most aggressive and lethal diseases worldwide. Whether β- adrenoceptor rivals potentiate gemcitabine, a standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer that offers only modest benefit due to acquired chemoresistance, has not been revealed.
 
"In this study, our data suggest ICI 118551 potentiates the antiproliferative effects of gemcitabine by inducing apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. The study implies that this combination may be an effective therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer," Wu said, "Collaborating with Qingyong Ma's laboratory at Xi'an Jiaotong University, China, we have published four papers together during the last two months. We aim to elucidate the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, a fatal disease."

According to the Elsevier website, The European Journal of Pharmacology publishes full-length papers on the mechanisms of action of chemical substances affecting biological systems. Wu laboratory research interests include tumor therapeutic targets, drug discovery, drug targets and biomarkers.

NDSU Graduate School Announces Teaching and Research Awards | 5/13/2011

May 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – The NDSU Graduate School has announced the 2010-11 Teaching and Research Awards. The awards are presented in partnership with colleges each year. "The Teaching and Research Awards recognize outstanding graduate students for their accomplishments in the classroom and in research laboratories," said David Wittrock, dean of the College of Graduate and Interdisciplinary Studies.

In honor and recognition of the graduate students' accomplishments, each student receives a $1,000 cash award. Awards were presented to the following graduate students:
 
Research
John Schuna - College of Human Development and Education
Lindsay Erickson - College of Science and Mathematics
Praveen Shukla - College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Allied Sciences
Mike Fuqua - College of Engineering and Architecture
Preeti Sule - College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
Sara Hansen - College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Allied Sciences
 
Teaching
Maxx Kureczko - College of Science and Mathematics
Craig Rood - College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Mohsen Hamidi - College of Engineering and Architecture
Brianna Stenger - College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
Meredith Wagner - College of Human Development and Education

North Dakota Renewable Energy Council Awards NDSU Grant for Collaborative Research on Green Technology | 5/13/2011

May 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – From agricultural crops to composite building products, research underway by a team of scientists and engineers at NDSU and the private sector could result in products to meet market demand for “green” composite building materials. The two-year $200,000 grant awarded by the North Dakota Renewable Energy Council will fund a portion of a project titled “Biobased Non-Isocyanate Urethane Hybrid Resins for Pultrusion Composites.” NDSU and Tecton Products, LLC, Fargo, N.D., are collaborating on the research.

Composites are traditionally made from glass fibers held together with a petrochemical-based binder resin. The interdisciplinary research team will develop new types of bio-based binder resins from agricultural products such as soybean oil, cellulose, and sugar.
 
Representatives on the collaborative research team include: Chad Ulven, assistant professor, NDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering; Dean Webster, professor, NDSU Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials; Dennis Wiesenborn, professor, and Judith Espinoza Perez, postdoctoral research fellow, NDSU Department of Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; and personnel from Tecton Products, LLC.

Using various chemical reactions on the agricultural raw materials, a series of candidate resins will be prepared for use in composites. The resins in composites will then be tested to identify the most promising resin candidates. NDSU and Tecton will collaborate to scale up the most promising resin systems for testing in a production environment.

"This type of material could be used in building products to meet a growing demand for ‘green’ composite materials,” said Ulven. The resulting product would be expected to have low or no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Such a product may also have enhanced physical properties, compared to its traditional counterpart. If successful, the composite materials could be commercialized and manufactured with the novel resin being developed with agricultural products.

The North Dakota Renewable Energy Council, under the State Industrial Commission, provided funding for the research to promote the growth of North Dakota’s renewable energy industries through research, development, marketing, and education.

The project underscores interdisciplinary research of scientific and engineering leaders to innovate in the area of renewable building products. In addition to North Dakota Industrial Commission funds, the North Dakota Soybean Council awarded $80,000 to support the research project.

About NDSU
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, NDSU links academics to opportunities. As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities without a medical school in the U.S., based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research

NDSU Researcher Studies Disease-Causing Bacteria | 5/9/2011

May 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — An NDSU researcher hopes her efforts can lead to the development of novel drugs to treat certain infectious diseases.

You can’t see them, but bacteria can cause serious health problems in the human body and on surfaces such as medical devices and food processing equipment. The bacteria may show up as plaque on teeth or cause otitis, a middle-ear infection, or cystic fibrosis, a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs. The bacteria also can lead to a sometimes deadly foodborne illness.

These collections of bacteria, called bacterial biofilms, are the subject of intensive research in North Dakota State University’s Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences. An estimated 60 to 80 percent of bacterial infectious diseases involve the formation of biofilms, according to the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Also, 76 million Americans suffer from foodborne illness each year.

Researchers don’t know how many of these foodborne illness incidents involve bacterial biofilms. “However, food processing equipment is often contaminated with bacterial biofilms,” says assistant professor Birgit Pruess, whose lab is focusing on studying biofilms. “This is of particular importance in a state like North Dakota, where so much of our nation’s and world’s food supply is being produced.”

Pruess is one of a group of scientists in the NDSU Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences conducting research on the development of infectious diseases and how organisms’ immune systems respond to those diseases. They are committed to understanding microorganisms and the disease process to enhance North Dakota’s efforts to protect against intentional and unintentional disease outbreaks.

But bacteria’s ability to form biofilm isn’t all bad: It can be used in bioindustrial processes. For instance, bioethanol production sometimes involves the formation of biofilm. This can be an advantage because the multiple species that form the biofilm are very close to each other, which facilitates the separation of the final products.

“The information that will be obtained from the research in my lab will constitute a major breakthrough in our understanding of the physiology that underlies biofilm formation and will have implications in several biofilm-associated problems and/or applications,” Pruess says.

One possible application is the development of novel drugs to treat biofilm-associated infectious diseases. Bacteria in a biofilm have a community lifestyle that has similarities to humans. They communicate with each other, are able to move to more desirable places and even have a molecular form of a memory that lasts about 20 seconds. “As a general rule, disrupting the communication pathways that lead to processes like biofilm formation is a promising alternative to traditional drug therapies that reduce bacterial growth while inducing resistance,” says Pruess, whose lab has a long history of studying regulatory pathways at the genetic level.

Biofilm-bound bacteria form three-dimensional structures consisting of multiple layers of bacteria. For example, bacteria at the outermost edge of the 3-D structure are exposed to more nutrients and oxygen than the bacteria in the center of the colony. The outermost bacteria also are exposed to the host’s immune system or, in cases of infectious diseases, antibiotics. “Drugs are often unable to penetrate deep into the biofilm,” Pruess says. “This means that they will need a target at the surface of the 3-D structure that constitutes the biofilm. We anticipate that this project will lead to the identification of a number of genes that can serve as targets for novel biofilm prevention and treatment options.” Her research aimed at identifying such surface targets is funded by a $358,750 grant from the National Institutes of Health.

A second project she is working on deals with determining the precise conditions under which bacterial biofilms form. Despite years of research on biofilms, few comprehensive studies address this question. Pruess, in collaboration with Anne Denton, an associate professor in NDSU’s Department of Computer Sciences, found that nutrients available to the bacteria are instrumental in determining the amount of biofilm that is formed. Pruess and Denton will pinpoint single nutrients that will inhibit biofilm formation, which also will be helpful in developing biofilm prevention and treatment techniques.

Pruess and Preeti Sule, a Ph.D. student, have studied a pathogenic E. coli strain grown on the surface of meat. E. coli is a naturally occurring bacterium found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most strains are harmless, but some can cause serious illness in humans. The strain Pruess and Sule studied would not form biofilm under most laboratory conditions. However, it probably does when grown on meat, Pruess says. They also found that eliminating flagella, the hairlike structures that help bacteria move, increased the bacteria’s ability to form biofilm, as well as the bacteria’s cell division rate and pathogenicity, or ability to produce an infectious disease in an organism.

“These findings open countless avenues to the development of novel meat treatments that would simultaneously reduce the cell number, the ability to form biofilm and pathogenicity,” Pruess says. “The research, which is funded by the State Board of Research and Education and the North Dakota Beef Commission, could help with one of the unresolved problems in meat processing: contamination with E. coli.”

Ossowski Named Director of NDSU Center for Computationally Assisted Science & Technology | 5/6/2011

May 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. – Dr. Martin Ossowski has been named director of the Center for Computationally Assisted Science & Technology (CCAST) at North Dakota State University. The appointment was announced by Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for research, creative activities & technology transfer.

At NDSU, Ossowski will work to enhance the capabilities of CCAST to provide scientific computational resources to researchers. Additional goals include partnering with the private, government, and university sectors in support of research opportunities. NDSU researchers use CCAST’s computing power to make discoveries in nanotechnology, agriculture, computer science, biotechnology and other fields.

“Computation has come of age as a critical tool for scientific discovery across all disciplines,” said Ossowski. “CCAST will continue to play an integral part in the already impressive portfolio of computationally assisted R&D at the NDSU while becoming a catalyst for creation of new and novel directions in scientific inquiry, engineering, technology transfer, and teaching in areas vital to the betterment of the state, the region, and the nation.”

“The two pillars of science have always been experimentation and theory,” said Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer. “For the 21st century, we have a third pillar, which is computation. At NDSU, we expect to be fully engaged in all three areas.”

Ossowski most recently served in the Research Computing Support Group at Rice University, Houston, Texas. In that position, he strengthened computational infrastructure and helped obtain funding for computing services for research. Ossowski previously served as a science consultant and coordinated multidisciplinary grant proposals at the Research Computing Core of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla., where he also served as a courtesy assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering.

In 2000, Ossowski received the National Research Council Resident Research Associateship Award and joined the Naval Research Laboratory’s (NRL) Center for Computational Materials Science. He worked to develop methods and algorithms for the efficient (linear-scaling) application of density functional theory. The methods developed at NRL were successfully used to study electronic, structural, elastic, and vibrational properties of complex oxides and other materials.

As a co-principal investigator and senior research personnel, Ossowski has secured approximately $10.7 million in funding for research from the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense and National Institutes of Health.

Martin Ossowski received his Ph.D. in theoretical condensed matter physics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL).  He worked as a post-doctoral research associate in the UNL Department of Physics and Astronomy on the first-principles computational extensions to the Gordon-Kim rigid-ion electron-gas model. Ossowski, a condensed matter physicist and quantum chemist, has authored or contributed more than 30 scientific articles and conference papers. He continues to work on algorithms toward greater efficiency of density functional theory methods.

The Center for Computationally Assisted Science & Technology, a unit within the NDSU Office of Research, currently supports more than 125 NDSU faculty, staff and student researchers in 20 departments. The Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, provides computing cycles which are used in research projects at NDSU that include developing materials that mimic bone, data mining, plant and soil science, multi-scale and 3-D modeling, quantum chemical calculations and calculations of enzyme structures, among others. The Center provides scientific computational resources to the NDSU research community and its partners to enable new discovery.

Students Receive ND EPSCoR Research Assistantship Awards | 5/6/2011

May 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Three students will be attending NDSU as recipients of Graduate Student Research Assistantship Awards from North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR).

Awardees, alma maters and areas of graduate studies at NDSU are: Jesse Martin, Valley City State University, chemistry-biochemistry; Fakira Soumalia Borkovec, Valley City State University, cereal and food sciences; and Thomas Shanandore, NDSU and an ND EPSCoR NATURE participant, civil engineering.

The Graduate Student Research Assistantship program provides North Dakota University System baccalaureate universities and tribal colleges/NATURE program graduates an opportunity to obtain master's or doctoral degrees in science, engineering and mathematics at North Dakota's two research universities, NDSU and University of North Dakota. Award stipend is $18,000 per student annually for two years.

North Dakota EPSCoR is a federally and state funded program designed to improve the ability of university researchers to compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in the sciences, engineering and mathematics. For more information on the Graduate Student Research Assistantship program, visit www.ndepscor.nodak.edu/programs.

NDSU Plant Sciences Graduate Student Receives $10,000 Grant | 5/6/2011

May 6, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Erin E. Burns, a master's degree student in the plant sciences department, has been awarded a North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Graduate Student Grant for $10,000. The title of her proposal is "Integration of biological control and native cover crops for Canada thistle control." She is co-advised by Greta Gramig, assistant professor of plant sciences, and Deirdre Prischmann-Voldseth, assistant professor of entomology.

NDSU College of Engineering and Architecture Recognizes Researcher of the Year | 5/3/2011

May 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Samee U. Khan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, received the 2011 College of Engineering and Architecture Researcher of the Year Award at a ceremony April 21.

Khan was recognized for his contributions to the field of large-scale energy-efficient distributed computing systems (green computing) and is considered an authority on green computing. He serves on the steering committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Technical Area of Green Computing and a dozen journal editorial boards. He has been on the technical committees of more than 50 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conferences.

Khan joined NDSU in the fall of 2008. Since then, he has published (accepted or appeared) 52 papers and served as an investigator of projects that have received grants in excess of $1 million. Khan also is an adjunct professor in the NDSU computer science department.

NDSU Students Present at North Dakota Academy of Sciences Meeting | 5/3/2011

May 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Five students represented NDSU at the North Dakota Academy of Sciences annual meeting April 18 at Turtle Mountain Community College.

Ambika Badh, a graduate student in Adnan Akyuz' lab, presented "Understanding growing degree days for corn in the United States of America." Krittanut Chaithawiwat, a graduate student in Eakalak Khan's and John McEvoy's labs, presented "Effects of nanoscale zero-valent iron on bacterial viability: role of growth phases." Priyankar Samanta, a graduate student in Birgit Pruess' lab, presented "Gene regulation in Escherichia coli biofilms."

Among the undergraduate students, Ty Lynnes, from Rubella Goswami's lab, presented data on "Development of a PCR-based assay for the detection of resistant isolates of Ascochyta rabiei to QoI fungicides" and Travis Rath, also from Goswami's lab, presented research on "Evaluating host based differences in aggressiveness of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum."

NDSU Civil Engineering Professor to Receive International Award for Scientific Contributions | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Dinesh Katti, professor of civil engineering at North Dakota State University, Fargo, was named the recipient of the “John Booker Excellence Medal,” a prestigious international award presented by the International Association for Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics (IACMAG).

The award is presented every three years to recognize individuals worldwide who have made significant contributions in research in geomechanics for nonlinear and time-dependent problems, including analytical and computational methods, constitutive modeling, consolidation and contaminant transport. Consideration is given to mathematical rigor and elegance that lead to fundamental understanding and insight into engineering and physical phenomena.

Katti will receive the award at the 13th International Conference of the IACMAG on May 9, 2011, in Melbourne, Australia.

Dr. Katti’s research uses quantitative computer modeling to understand molecular interactions between clays and fluids and how it impacts engineering properties. Both are critical to design structures and develop solutions to prevent bridges and roads that buckle, or buildings that shift or sink, as well as for design of clay liners to prevent contaminants from entering groundwater.

He was selected for the international award due to his major contributions to the field of geomechanics through the development of methodologies that describe the role of molecular phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical and permeability properties of swelling clays. Dr. Katti’s research impacts geotechnical engineering projects on swelling clays and geoenvironmental projects involving clay liners. His fundamental multiscale approach on mechanics of swelling clays also impacts nanoclays based composites for structural, geotechnical and biomedical applications.

“This award reflects the breadth and scope of contributions by Dr. Katti and his team to this important field of study, as well as the role of computational modeling to push the frontiers forward and change the landscape of 21st century research,” said Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer.

Dr. Dinesh Katti received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Arizona at Tucson and joined NDSU in 1996. He received his master’s degree in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India, and bachelor’s degree from the National Institute of Technology, Srinagar, India.

Dr. Katti has published more than 130 scientific articles and written three books and five book chapters. He has secured more than $2.3 million in federal and state funding for research. His research on clays is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation. Katti’s computational research is also supported by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the TeraGrid and the NDSU Center for Computationally Assisted Science & Technology. He currently serves as chair for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) technical committee on Properties of Materials and formerly chaired the technical committee on Poromechanics. He also serves as Associate Editor of the ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics and the Journal of Nanomechanics & Micromechanics.

About NDSU
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, NDSU links academics to opportunities. As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities without a medical school in the U.S., based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research.

NDSU Science Café to Discuss How Maternal Nutrition Affects Offspring | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. The connection between maternal nutrition and the well being of offspring will be explored at the next NDSU Science Café scheduled for Tuesday, May 10 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in Stokers Basement in the Hotel Donaldson, downtown Fargo.

Larry Reynolds, University Distinguished Professor at NDSU, will present "You Are What Your Mother Ate: How Maternal Nutrition Might Determine Health and Well Being of Her Offspring (and Beyond!)" to explain one of the major emerging concepts in all of biology and medicine - fetal or developmental programming.

In the past 20 plus years, research in developmental programming has shown that various maternal factors such as malnutrition, age, genotype and stress may affect not only fetal and postnatal growth and development, but also may profoundly influence health and well being of the offspring as adults. For example, poor maternal nutrition during pregnancy can lead to a much greater incidence of metabolic syndrome (obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) in her offspring once they reach adulthood, and even can have similar health consequences in subsequent generations.

Reynolds also will describe how various large animal models, including several of his research group's models in sheep, have contributed to our understanding of the basis of developmental programming and, most importantly, are providing promising and relatively simply strategies that clinicians and livestock producers might be able to use to minimize the negative consequences of developmental programming.

NDSU Researcher Studies Disease-Causing Bacteria | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. An NDSU researcher hopes her efforts can lead to the development of novel drugs to treat certain infectious diseases

You can’t see them, but bacteria can cause serious health problems in the human body and on surfaces such as medical devices and food processing equipment. The bacteria may show up as plaque on teeth or cause otitis, a middle-ear infection, or cystic fibrosis, a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs. The bacteria also can lead to a sometimes deadly foodborne illness. These collections of bacteria, called bacterial biofilms, are the subject of intensive research in North Dakota State University’s Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences.

An estimated 60 to 80 percent of bacterial infectious diseases involve the formation of biofilms, according to the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Also, 76 million Americans suffer from foodborne illness each year. Researchers don’t know how many of these foodborne illness incidents involve bacterial biofilms.

“However, food processing equipment is often contaminated with bacterial biofilms,” says assistant professor Birgit Pruess, whose lab is focusing on studying biofilms. “This is of particular importance in a state like North Dakota, where so much of our nation’s and world’s food supply is being produced.”

Pruess is one of a group of scientists in the Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences conducting research on the development of infectious diseases and how organisms’ immune systems respond to those diseases. They are committed to understanding microorganisms and the disease process to enhance North Dakota’s efforts to protect against intentional and unintentional disease outbreaks.

But bacteria’s ability to form biofilm isn’t all bad: It can be used in bioindustrial processes. For instance, bioethanol production sometimes involves the formation of biofilm. This can be an advantage because the multiple species that form the biofilm are very close to each other, which facilitates the separation of the final products.

“The information that will be obtained from the research in my lab will constitute a major breakthrough in our understanding of the physiology that underlies biofilm formation and will have implications in several biofilm-associated problems and/or applications,” Pruess says.

One possible application is the development of novel drugs to treat biofilm-associated infectious diseases. Bacteria in a biofilm have a community lifestyle that has similarities to humans. They communicate with each other, are able to move to more desirable places and even have a molecular form of a memory that lasts about 20 seconds.

“As a general rule, disrupting the communication pathways that lead to processes like biofilm formation is a promising alternative to traditional drug therapies that reduce bacterial growth while inducing resistance,” says Pruess, whose lab has a long history of studying regulatory pathways at the genetic level.

Biofilm-bound bacteria form three-dimensional structures consisting of multiple layers of bacteria. For example, bacteria at the outermost edge of the 3-D structure are exposed to more nutrients and oxygen than the bacteria in the center of the colony. The outermost bacteria also are exposed to the host’s immune system or, in cases of infectious diseases, antibiotics.

“Drugs are often unable to penetrate deep into the biofilm,” Pruess says. “This means that they will need a target at the surface of the 3-D structure that constitutes the biofilm. We anticipate that this project will lead to the identification of a number of genes that can serve as targets for novel biofilm prevention and treatment options.”

Her research aimed at identifying such surface targets is funded by a $358,750 grant from the National Institutes of Health.

A second project she is working on deals with determining the precise conditions under which bacterial biofilms form. Despite years of research on biofilms, few comprehensive studies address this question. Pruess, in collaboration with Anne Denton, an associate professor in NDSU’s Department of Computer Sciences, found that nutrients available to the bacteria are instrumental in determining the amount of biofilm that is formed. Pruess and Denton will pinpoint single nutrients that will inhibit biofilm formation, which also will be helpful in developing biofilm prevention and treatment techniques.

Pruess and Preeti Sule, a Ph.D. student, have studied a pathogenic E. coli strain grown on the surface of meat. E. coli is a naturally occurring bacterium found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most strains are harmless, but some can cause serious illness in humans. The strain Pruess and Sule studied would not form biofilm under most laboratory conditions. However, it probably does when grown on meat, Pruess says. They also found that eliminating flagella, the hairlike structures that help bacteria move, increased the bacteria’s ability to form biofilm, as well as the bacteria’s cell division rate and pathogenicity, or ability to produce an infectious disease in an organism.

“These findings open countless avenues to the development of novel meat treatments that would simultaneously reduce the cell number, the ability to form biofilm and pathogenicity,” Pruess says. “The research, which is funded by the State Board of Research and Education and the North Dakota Beef Commission, could help with one of the unresolved problems in meat processing: contamination with E. coli.”

Local Foods Symposium at NDSU to Discuss Challenges of Meeting Demand | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. In an ever-changing food environment, consumers are more aware of "local foods," but markets are unable to keep up with demand. To explore this issue and develop a broad roadmap for collaboration among the universities and communities, the Scaling Up Local Foods Research Symposium is scheduled at NDSU on May 19 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Prairie Rose Room.

This is not a technical conference, rather a symposium intended as an interactive session with facilitated discussions and working groups including scholars, educators and practitioners from a variety of disciplines.  Margaret Adamek, owner and principal of Terra Soma Consulting Services, a strategic services firm that builds capacity for cross-sector food systems change, and Holly Rose Mawby, director of the Entrepreneurial Center for Horticulture in Bottineau, N.D., will facilitate the discussions.

Symposium Objectives include:
            · Identify the questions and challenges related to scaling up local foods in the region;
            · Outline the opportunities for research collaborations among universities and communities;
            · Determine available and potential sources of funding and investments to enhance our collective expertise.
 
"We want to know what we can contribute as researchers and Extension educators," said Abby Gold, assistant professor and nutrition and wellness specialist for NDSU Extension Service.
 
This symposium is free, but limited to 50 people. Travel funds are available through the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program and rooms have been reserved at NDSU, so lodging, if necessary is covered.

For more information, contact Abby Gold at abby.gold@ndsu.edu

NDSU and Diabetic Retinopathy Project Receives Funding | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Eating for Your Eyes II: Diabetic Retinopathy, a project developed by NDSU in collaboration with the North Dakota Optometric Association, has been awarded $10,000 by Healthy Vision Community Awards. Project directors are Nancy Kopp, executive director of the North Dakota Optometric Association, and Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise science at NDSU, in collaboration with Julie Garden-Robinson, associate professor and food and nutrition specialist with NDSU Extension Service. Healthy Vision Community Awards are sponsored by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to make a difference in communities across the nation by supporting grassroots eye health education. The seed money supplies the spark to get projects started, which are then sustained through community partnerships.

Healthy Vision Community Awards, established in 2003, is a federal program that provides funding directly to communities to improve eye health awareness. Seed money goes to nonprofit and community-based organizations to implement innovative programs or expand existing services to new groups.

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetic retinopathy, a diabetic eye disease, accounts for 12,000 to 24,000 new cases of blindness every year and is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults. Prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes is estimated at 23.6 million people (7.8 percent of the population). A disproportionate number of people ages 60 and older, 12.2 million people (23.1 percent of the population), have diabetes. Of the various ethnic groups, American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest rates of diabetes at 16.5 percent. Prevalence of diabetes has increased by more than 3 million from 2005 to 2007. In North Dakota, 6.1 percent of adults were diagnosed with diabetes in 2007. Direct and indirect medical costs of diabetes in the United States are estimated at $174 billion.

Eating for your Eyes II: Diabetic Retinopathy project directors aim to increase awareness and knowledge of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, and associated risk and prevention factors, including eye examinations and diet. Stastny, a registered dietitian, will lead workshops throughout North Dakota during 2011-12.

NDSU Civil Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students to Present Paper | 5/2/2011

May 2, 2011, Fargo, N.D. NDSU civil engineering doctoral students Sreerama Kasi Somayajula and Yaping Chi, and G. Padmanabhan, professor of civil engineering at NDSU, had their paper, "Teaching flownet concepts to engineering undergraduates using electrical analogy of groundwater flow" accepted for presentation and publication in the Proceedings of the 118th American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exhibition scheduled for June 26-29 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The paper discusses a simple experimental setup to obtain flownets of selected groundwater problems with different boundary conditions using electrically analogous flow situations. Students are asked to study and understand the selected physical groundwater problems first. Next, they are asked to conceive the corresponding electrically analogous problem for solving which they could use the experimental setup. In addition, students study and understand the mathematical formulation of differential and difference equations of the problem.

Padmanabhan is a longstanding member of the American Society for Engineering Education. The organization has a worldwide membership of approximately 13,990 committed to furthering education in engineering and engineering technology and promotes excellence in instruction, research, public service and practice.

Collaboration Energizes NDSU Research | 4/26/2011

April 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Organic-based solar cells have the potential to revolutionize renewable energy technology. Cheaper and more flexible than their silicon-based counterparts, organic solar cells can be incorporated into places not ordinarily used for gathering the sun's energy, such as clothing, office windows and messenger bags.

Seven years of research collaboration between Seth Rasmussen, associate professor of chemistry at NDSU, and Paul Dastoor, professor of physics and director of the Centre for Organic Electronics at the University of Newcastle, Australia, have led to cutting-edge solar cell technology. Rasmussen and Dastoor specialize in a subset of the cells that can absorb near infrared light. In addition to development of solar cells that absorb more of the solar spectrum, such detection with cheaper materials could help in the development of better fiber-optic communication networks.

"The science behind these types of devices can't really be done by a single person," Rasmussen said. "We're both working on two halves of the problem." Rasmussen has been working with the materials used in these solar cells since 1999. Dastoor would have to rely on commercially available materials without a synthetic chemist.

"The main thing that's in it for me is being able to develop new materials and being able to contribute to the field," Rasmussen said.

‘Materials Science of Superheroes' to be Explored at Fargo Theater on May 3 | 4/25/2011

April 25, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Ponder this. Who is faster: Superman or the Flash?

How does Captain America’s shield work?

What type of metal is used in Wonder Woman’s bracelets that enables her to deflect bullets?

James Kakalios, author of the popular science book “The Physics of Superheroes,” will be the featured speaker for the 2011 NDSU College of Science and Mathematics Community Lectureship scheduled for Tuesday, May 3 at 7 p.m. at the Fargo Theatre. The event is free and open to the public, science teachers and students from junior high through college.

While materials scientists don’t typically consult comic books when selecting research topics, innovations first introduced in superhero adventures as fiction can sometimes find their way off the comic book page and into reality.

In his presentation, “Materials Science of Superheroes,” Kakalios will describe the real physics behind these comic book heroes. Kakalios served as the science consultant for the Warner Bros. superhero film, “Watchmen.” He is the Taylor Distinguished Professor at the University of Minnesota’s School of Physics and Astronomy.

Learn more about Kakalios and his science mission at http://www.physicsofsuperheroes.com

NDSU Mathematics Faculty and Graduate Students Receive Research Awards | 4/25/2011

April 25, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Mariangel Alfonseca, assistant professor of mathematics at NDSU, was awarded a three-year research grant from the National Science Foundation. Alfonseca's research applies Fourier techniques to the study of convex bodies, which have central importance in problems of optimization and linear programming.

Sean Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of mathematics, received the 2011 College of Science and Mathematics Excellence in Research Award on April 15. He was recognized for his work in commutative algebra and homological algebra. "Sean was widely known early on for his prowess in commutative algebra. He is widely considered one of the brightest rising stars in the field," wrote Jim Coykendall, James A. Meier professor of mathematics, in a letter of nomination. He noted Sather-Wagstaff has published or submitted 29 papers since joining the NDSU faculty in 2007.

Saeed Nasseh and Benjamin Anderson, both mathematics graduate students, were awarded two NDSU graduate school dissertation fellowships. Sather-Wagstaff is their adviser.

Lindsay Erickson won the college's graduate research award, which recognizes significant contributions to the student's scientific discipline as evidenced by publications, grants and/or recognition by the individual's professional organizations or community. Erickson's adviser is Warren Shreve.

Maxx Kureczko received the college's graduate teaching award. It recognizes outstanding performance in the classroom at the undergraduate or graduate level as indicated by knowledge, organization and presentation of the subject matter in an interesting and stimulating fashion, with continued impact or influence on the students.

The recipients of the awards were determined by the College Nominations and Awards Committee and the dean of the college.

NDSU Professor Named President-Elect of Western Social Science Association | 4/21/2011

April 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. Tom Isern, professor of history and university distinguished professor at NDSU, assumed duties on April 17 as president-elect of the Western Social Science Association. The principal duty of this position during 2011-12 is to serve as general program chair for the annual association conference that will take place April 11-14, 2012, in Houston. This involves the review and scheduling of some 800 papers and other program presentations across a range of social science disciplines.

In 2013, Isern will serve as president of the association. During past years he has served on the association's executive council and as its vice president. He also is the founder of its New Zealand and Australian Studies Section.

The Western Social Science Association is an international association of social scientists that meets each April in a western American city. Its peer-reviewed publication is the Social Science Journal. "The WSSA is distinguished among scholarly associations for its cosmopolitan character and its multi-disciplinary approaches," said Isern.

NDSU Lichens Expert Contributes to International Database | 4/21/2011

April 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Lichens are sometimes called "the most bizarre of all forms of life," because each species is composed of two, sometimes three, separate organisms. One is a fungus, while the other is an alga. Compounding the situation, there sometimes can be a bacterium that photosynthesizes. They are often found in trees and on boulders across North America and around the world.

Ted Esslinger, NDSU professor of botany/biology, previously published a checklist of more than 3,500 species of lichens found in North America. The checklist is updated annually, and now stands at approximately 5,000 species. He also is working with an international group building a database that contains more than 32,000 references dealing with lichens. Esslingeriana idahensis, a genus of lichens, is named in his honor.

"One of the things that make lichens special is they do really well in extreme environments. Some are well adapted to Arctic environments, others to Arizona deserts and still others to Minnesota forests," said Esslinger, who has found more than 100 previously unknown lichen species. "It's an inspiration to discover something no one else knows. That moment of discovery is truly wonderful."

Esslinger is currently collaborating on an effort to study the DNA of a group of lichens. He and his colleagues are hopeful by exploring the genetic makeup they may discover the evolutionary pathway that led to the organism's ability to adapt to diverse habitats.

Esslinger is a past member of the executive council and president of the American Bryological and Lichenological Society. He is a reviewer for many journals, including American Journal of Botany, Bryologist, Environmental and Experimental Botany, New Zealand Journal of Botany and Smithsonian Contributions to Botany.

NDSU Researchers Recognized for Scientific Article | 4/19/2011

April 19, 2011, Fargo, N.D. A scientific article by North Dakota State University researchers has been recognized by the scientific journal Soft Matter, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, United Kingdom. The journal promotes outstanding work by naming hot scientific articles that are featured on the journal’s web site. Editors highlighted work by NDSU researchers Ananiy Kohut, Xuliang Dai, Danielle Pinnick, Douglas Schulz and Andriy Voronov.

The article, titled “Host-Guest” Interaction between Cyclohexasilane and Amphiphilic Invertible Macromolecules,” examines the extent of the interaction between liquid cyclohexasilane (Si6H12) and candidate oxygen-containing polymers. The work is associated with ongoing research involving a system to allow targeted delivery of (Si6H12) for localized deposition of silicon-based electronic materials. Such research could result in advances in electronics and energy.

Kohut is a postdoctoral research fellow in the NDSU Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials and Voronov is an assistant professor in the department. Schulz is a senior research scientist in the NDSU Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE). Dai is a CNSE research scientist and Pinnick is an NDSU graduate in chemistry who served as an apprentice at CNSE.

The research by the NDSU team was supported by grants from the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research/National Science Foundation (EPS-0447679) and the Department of Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) under agreement number H94003-09-2-0905. More information about the research is found at http://pubs.rsc.org | doi:10.1039/C0SM01337D

The scientific journal Soft Matter has a global circulation and interdisciplinary audience with a particular focus on the interface between physics, materials science, biology, chemical engineering and chemistry.

NDSU Chemistry Professor Named to Editorial Boards | 4/14/2011

April 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Dr. Wenfang Sun, professor of chemistry and biochemistry at NDSU, has been selected to serve on the editorial board of two journals. She joins seventeen other members from around the world on the board of Reports of Theoretical Chemistry, an open access peer-reviewed journal that publishes original research, reports, reviews and commentaries in the field of theoretical chemistry. Professor Sun has also been selected to serve on the board of Organic Chemistry: Current Research. This journal was founded to provide a venue for the rapid dissemination of the most exciting research in the field of organic chemistry.

NDSU Faculty to Discuss Renewable Materials at Summit | 4/14/2011
 

April 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Chad Ulven, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at NDSU, will present "Renewable Materials Opportunities for the Region" at the BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota and LifeScience Alley Renewable Materials Summit: Emerging Markets in the Upper Midwest on April 27 at the Courtyard by Marriott in Moorhead, Minn.

The one-day program will feature industry leaders focusing on developing and established markets in renewable materials, while exploring issues yet to be confronted. Ulven is a member of the West Central Renewable Materials Coalition that will host the event. "The Midwest has the potential to be a global leader in the renewable materials industry," Ulven said. "Our region has considerable strengths in material science, engineering and processing. From feedstock to manufacturing, we have all the capabilities to establish and grow this industry."

The renewable materials market includes materials that are made from biological sources. These can be biofibers, biopolymers, biodegradable plastics and biopackaging. Familiar resources used to make these materials include corn, soybeans and wood fibers.

"The renewable materials industry is developing quickly," said Dale Wahlstrom, CEO/president of The BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota and LifeScience Alley. "Companies and communities need to be educated on these opportunities so they are in a position to capitalize on this growing market."

The student rate for the conference is $30 and early-bird registration is $50 until April 18. To register, visit  LifeScience Alley's homepage, http://www.lifesciencealley.org/programs_events/detail.aspx?id=597,  and click on the event calendar.

Human Development and Education Research at NDSU Internationally Recognized | 4/14/2011

April 14, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — An article by Kevin Miller, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. The article addresses the effects of increasing electrical stimulation frequency on cramp duration. Research observations indicated that increasing electrical stimulation frequency also increased cramp duration. Thus, if clinicians want to study the effectiveness of various cramp strategies, they can increase stimulation frequency to generate a cramp that lasts long enough to study the effectiveness of the treatment.

Miller also was interviewed by Richard Scott, a producer for a New Zealand radio program called "This Way Up" that explores the things humans use and consume. The interview related to Miller's research on muscle cramping and pickle juice. They heard about Miller's research from the interview given to Peter Smith published at www.good.is/post/how-pickle-juice-changed-the-world-of-sports-food-innovations-from-the-football-field.

Beth Blodgett Salafia and Kristen Benson, both assistant professors in human development and family sciences, presented a poster, "The roles of dating status and BMI in late adolescent girls' body image and sexuality," at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development in April in Montreal, Canada.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family sciences at NDSU, led a symposium in March at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development in Montreal titled "Promoting social-emotional development and preventing adjustment problems in middle childhood." He also had a paper in the symposium, "Bringing the rejected and rejecters together: Promoting peer acceptance and social competence in Early Risers Skills for Success."

"Comparison of Views of the Nature of Science Between Natural Science and Nonscience Majors," will be published in CBE Life Sci Educ 2010: 45-54 and will be featured in the Highlights issue of the journal. Authors include Marie C. Desaulniers Miller; Lisa M. Montplaisir, assistant professor of biological sciences; Erika G. Offerdahl, assistant professor of chemistry; Fu-Chih Cheng, assistant professor of statistics; and Gerald L. Ketterling, assistant professor of education at NDSU. To view the paper in its original publication, visit www.lifescied.org/cgi/reprint/9/1/45.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, had his paper, "The prevalence and characteristics of wellness programs and centers at two and four year colleges and universities," accepted for publication in the Recreational Sports Journal. The paper also was nominated for the Article of Distinction Award.

An article by Strand and Vicky Bender titled "Knowledge and Use of Appropriate Instructional Strategies by Physical Education Teachers," was published in The Physical Educator. Bender teaches physical education at Wilton, N.D., Public School and completed her master's degree in health, nutrition and exercise sciences.

Strand also is the lead editor of a book titled "Health/Physical Education and Model Technological Applications." The book brings together global scholars, researchers and practitioners to provide models and discussion regarding the use of technology in K-12 physical education and university teacher preparation. Its goal is to convey both the transfer of knowledge between disciplines and to exchange experience on the effective use of technology that leads to the creation of new behaviors and methods.

Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of dietetics at NDSU, co-wrote "Effect of nutrition facts panel and ingredient declaration on customer satisfaction and perception of nutrition," published in the Journal of Food Service Business Research. Stastny and Julie Garden-Robinson co-wrote "Eating for Your Eyes" published in theJournal of Nutrition Education Behavior.

Gary Liguori, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, has been selected to review research abstracts for the 139th American Public Health Annual Meeting (Food and Nutrition track) in 2011.

The North Dakota Counseling Association held the annual Midwinter Conference in Bismarck, N.D., where NDSU counselor educators contributed in the following areas: Carol Buchholz Holland, assistant professor, School of Education, presented two professional programs: "Planned Happenstance: How to Make the Most Out of Unplanned Life Events" and "Play and Creative Arts Activities for School Counseling Settings." Buchholz Holland also is a member of the North Dakota Counseling Association Governing Board that met during the conference. Bob Nielsen, professor, School of Education, presented "Remember When? From Historical Perspectives to Current Practice;" and Jill Nelson, assistant professor, School of Education, presided over the North Dakota Association of Counselor Education and Supervision Membership meeting. NDSU graduate students Amber Bach-Gorman, Sara Lybeck and Mary Onungwe presented at the conference.

Kellie Hamre, senior lecturer in apparel, design and hospitality management, completed a panel presentation at the Interior Designer Educators Council 2011 annual conference in Denver. The panel discussion, "Journey of Emerging Interior Design Educators: Survival, Growth, Acculturation, Adaptation, Assimilation," explored the journey emerging educators experience as they acculturate and assimilate into the environment of teaching interior design in higher education institutions. The panel presentation won the Member's Choice Award and was recognized as one of the Top 10 papers presented at the conference.

Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was selected as the Area 2 Outstanding Dietetic Educator representing a Coordinated Program in Dietetics. She received her award at the Area 2 DEP meeting in Indianapolis March 31-April 1.

Justin Wageman, associate professor in the School of Education, was awarded a grant for $129,033 to work with McREL on the review, development and facilitation of the new library/technology literacy content standards for North Dakota.

Beth Blodgett Salafia, assistant professor of human development and family sciences at NDSU, and recent graduate Jessica Lemer had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Child and Family Studies. The article, "Associations between multiple types of stress and disordered eating among girls and boys in middle school," is available online.

Laura Oster Aaland, doctoral student, and Myron Eighmy, professor, both in the School of Education, had their paper, "The impact of an on-line educational video and a medical amnesty policy on college students' intentions to seek help in the presence of alcohol poisoning symptoms," published in the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice.

Shanda Traiser, doctoral student, and Myron Eighmy, professor in the School of Education, had their paper, "Moral development and narcissism of private and public senior-level business students," published in the Journal of Business Ethics.

Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor in the School of Education at NDSU, presented "A Great Conversation with Jamaica Kincaid" on April 1 in Grand Forks, N.D. Lajimodiere also discussed her research related to Native American Boarding schools. Her presentation was titled  "Kill the Indian, Save the Man."

Amelia Asperin, assistant professor of apparel, design and hospitality management, was elected West-Midwest Regional Director for the Foodservice Systems Management Educational Council. The council's members are foodservice and dietetic educators and practitioners committed to improving research, education and practice in foodservice management.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of education/English and others from North Dakota represented the Red River Valley Writing Project at the spring meeting of the National Writing Project in Washington, D.C., March 30-April 1. The group asked for congressional support of the National Writing Project, whose mission is to improve the teaching of writing K-16.

Brenda Hall, associate professor of education, and counseling master's degree student Jamie Anderson presented at the National Youth-At-Risk Conference March 6-9 in Savannah, Ga. During their presentation, "Developing Positive Teen Dating Identities: A Group Counseling Model for Adolescent Males," they shared information from their research related to intimate partner violence prevention.

David Silkenat, assistant professor in the School of Education, had an article, "'In Good Hands, in a Safe Place: Female Academies in Confederate North Carolina," published in the January issue of the North Carolina Historical Review.

Jodi Burrer and Abby Milton, graduate students in the Master of Athletic Training program, had a peer-reviewed abstract selected for a poster presentation at the 2011 National Athletic Trainers' Association annual meeting and clinical symposia in New Orleans in June.

NDSU Gear Up for Grants Seminar Scheduled | 4/13/2011

April 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The NDSU Office of Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer has scheduled a Gear Up for Grants seminar titled "The New NIH Review & Scoring System - Get the Inside Story" for Wednesday, April 27, from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Family Life Center room 122.

At the seminar, panelists will discuss what it's like to be a reviewer of grant proposals. They will focus on the new review process and scoring system used by the National Institutes of Health for evaluating submitted grant proposals. Panelists will include Dr. Mukund Sibi, James A. Meier and University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry; Dr. Larry Reynolds, University Distinguished Professor of Animal Sciences; and Dr. Kent Rodgers, Professor of chemistry. Each has extensive experience as a National Institutes of Health grant applicant and reviewer of grant proposals.

They will discuss their experiences as panel reviewers with National Institutes of Health study sections, describe how the review process works and offer valuable inside tips to potential grant applicants for National Institutes of Health funds.

NDSU Faculty to Publish Paper in Journal of Neuro-Oncology | 4/13/2011

April 13, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, co-wrote the article, "The Natural History of Extracranial Metastasis from Glioblastoma Multiforme," that will be published in Journal of Neuro-Oncology.

According to the article, the extracranial metastasis is a unique but rare manifestation of glioblastomamultiforme. It is thought to arise from glioblastoma cells disseminated into the blood stream.

The authors undertook a comprehensive electronic search of extracranial glioblastoma and identified 88 cases published between 1928 and 2009. Cases included in the analysis were primary or secondary glioblastomas that subsequently invaded organs outside the brain or spinal cord. Non-glioblastoma histologies were excluded. The result showed that the median overall survival time was 10.5 months (range 0.0 - 60.0 months). The median time from symptom onset to glioblastoma diagnosis was 2.5 months, from diagnosis to detection of extracranial metastasis was 8.5 months and from metastasis to death was 1.5 months. From 1940 to 2009, there has been progressive lengthening of the interval from detection of extracranial metastasis to death, at a rate of 0.7 months per decade (95% confidence interval 0.5 - 1.0 months). Age, gender and site of primary glioblastoma did not influence overall survival. Patients treated with surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and cerebrospinal fluid shunting had the longest average survival interval from metastasis to death when compared to those treated with surgery alone; radiation alone; surgery and radiation; and surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Lung and concurrent leptomeningeal metastasis are prognostic factors of extremely poor outcomes.

The work was led by collaborator Eric Wong, associate professor and director of Brain Tumor Center and Neuro-Oncology Unit, Harvard Medical School. "From our observations, patients with glioblastoma extracranial metastasis have poor prognosis. There has been a progressive lengthening of survival in each successive decade from 1940 to 2000," Wu said.

Springer.com describes the Journal of Neuro-Oncology as a multi-disciplinary journal encompassing basic, applied and clinical investigations in all research areas as they relate to cancer and the central nervous system. It provides a single forum for communication among neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiotherapists, medical oncologists, neuropathologists, neurodiagnosticians and laboratory-based oncologists conducting relevant research.

Wu lab at NDSU is interested in tumor therapeutic targets, signaling pathways, drug discovery and biomarkers. Wu lab has had a close and long collaboration with Wong's lab at Harvard Medical School.

NDSU Accounting Faculty Receive 'Best Paper' at International Conference | 4/12/2011

April 12, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — A paper by Yongtao (David) Hong, assistant professor of accounting at NDSU, and Margaret Andersen, associate professor of accounting, received "best paper" recognition at the 2011 New Orleans International Academic Conference hosted by the Clute Institute.

The paper, "Corporate Social Responsibility Performance: An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Industry," examines the strengths and concerns of the corporate social responsibility performance of firms and if there are discernible industry effects.

Corporations operate within the context of society, and as a result have responsibilities to be good citizens within that society. At the same time, firms face competitive pressures from the economic environments in which they operate. Do the different legal, social and economic environments faced by corporations cause them to respond to their corporate social responsibilities in ways that are related to the industry in which they operate? Using ANOVA, the results indicate there are general industry-wide patterns in corporate social responsibility characteristics.

The Clute Institute was founded in 1985 for the purpose of disseminating the latest scientific research on various business and economics-related topics. The scope of their mission now includes the dissemination of knowledge related to college-level teaching and administrative issues. To accomplish this mission, the Clute Institute publishes 14 academic journals and sponsors multiple annual academic conferences.

NDSU Business Faculty's Paper Accepted to Journal | 4/12/2011

April 12, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Margaret Andersen, associate professor of accounting at NDSU; Yongtao (David) Hong, assistant professor of accounting; and Limin Zhang, assistant professor of management information systems, had their manuscript, "IT, CSR and Industry Relationships: A Descriptive Study," accepted for publication in the International Journal of Management & Information Systems.

In the paper, the authors investigate the research question, "Are there discernible relationships between a firm's information technology (IT) spending and corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the industry level?" The purpose of the paper is to offer an exploratory analysis into the relationship between IT investment and CSR. The findings indicate there is no immediate association between IT investment and CSR at the industry level.

NDSU Graduate Students to Share Research with Campus Community | 4/7/2011

April 7, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — From agriculture to cancer cells to exercise to flooding - NDSU graduate students' research covers a wide range of topics. To help individuals learn more about the diverse contributions graduate students make to the university and beyond, the NDSU Graduate Student Association has scheduled the third annual NDSU Graduate Research and Arts Forum for April 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Union.

The event highlights graduate students' research, outreach and creative endeavors. This year, the forum will include 40 posters, one panel and three individual presentations.

According to Trista Manikowske, a graduate student in exercise science and nutrition and president of the Graduate Student Association, the forum provides valuable experience for graduate students. "Submitting research for review and acceptance is an ongoing process in higher education," Manikowske said. "This is a great opportunity to show something to university peers before presenting to a national audience." She adds that participating in the forum can be included on an individual's vita and could help when applying to future programs or jobs.

The forum is open to anyone to attend. Manikowske especially encourages students considering graduate school to come see what it is about. But she says it is a good opportunity for everyone to get a glimpse of what the future will bring. "This is an opportunity to see some of the top research being performed in the Midwest, nation and even the world," Manikowske said. "Research being performed now at NDSU will soon directly and indirectly affect the state and our future."

McNair Scholar at NDSU Publishes in International Journal | 4/7/2011

April 7, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Garrett Brunell, former McNair Scholar, recently had his manuscript published in the prestigious international journal, "Composite Structures." Brunell worked with his NDSU faculty mentor, Jimmy Kim, assistant professor of civil engineering, for a research project concerning infrastructure rehabilitation with advanced composite materials. Specifically, Brunell has examined behavior of damaged steel beams repaired with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets. "The McNair Scholars Program truly inspires promising undergraduate students and fosters competitive professionals. Garrett's contribution to my research was significant and I am very happy to see his successful achievement," Kim said. Kay Modin, project director of the McNair Scholars Program, recalls Brunell's performance, "Through core classes in civil engineering, two successful steel bridge national competitions and research work under the mentorship of Dr. Kim, Garrett is one of many McNair achievers continuing a successful journey in graduate education." Brunell also was a co-captain of the ASCE Steel Bridge Team at NDSU that won the national competition in 2010.

The Ronald E. McNair Scholarship program is intended to help upper-division undergraduate students achieve academic success and increase the number of professors from traditionally under-represented populations. NDSU is one of 14 original universities chosen in 1989 to host the McNair Program established by the United States Department of Education. NDSU students who have earned more than 60 credits with the greatest potential for pursuing graduate studies are encouraged to be part of the scholarship program. Brunell is pursuing his master's in structural engineering under the direction of Kim.

Community Lectureship Sponsored by NDSU Explores ‘Materials Science of Superheroes’ | 3/31/2011

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — James Kakalios, author of the popular science book “The Physics of Superheroes,” will be the featured speaker for the 2011 NDSU College of Science and Math Community Lectureship scheduled for May 3 at 7 p.m. at the Fargo, N.D., Theatre. The event is free and open to the public.

In his presentation, “Materials Science of Superheroes,” Kakalios will describe the real physics behind Spider-Man’s webbing and ask questions such as: What type of metal is used in Wonder Woman’s bracelets that enables her to deflect bullets? What is the chemical composition of Captain America’s shield? And who is faster: Superman or the Flash?

Kakalios is the Taylor Distinguished Professor at the University of Minnesota’s School of Physics and Astronomy. He earned his doctorate in physics from the University of Chicago.

NDSU Mathematics Assistant Professor's Article Noted for Citations | 3/31/2011
 

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — A research article written by Sean Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of mathematics at NDSU, has been identified as one of the top 10 most cited articles from the journal, Communications in Algebra, from the years 2006 to 2010. The article, "Reflexivity and Ring Homomorphisms of Finite Flat Dimension," was co-written with Anders Frankild of the University of Copenhagen and appeared in 2007. It deals with some aspects of the homological theory of complexes and ring homomorphisms.

See www.tandf.co.uk/journals/cited/LAGB.pdf for more information.

NDSU Math Faculty, Students and Alumni Present at Conference | 3/31/2011

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Faculty members, graduate students and alumni of NDSU’s mathematics department attended the spring meeting of the American Mathematical Society’s Central Section March 19-20 at the University of Iowa, Iowa City.

NDSU faculty members Jason Boynton and Sean Sather-Wagstaff presented their research in the special session on Commutative Ring Theory. Graduate students Ben Anderson, Beth Kubik and Saeed Nasseh also presented in the session, as did NDSU alumnus Chris Spicer who is now a faculty member at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa. Graduate student Lindsay Erickson presented in a contributed paper session. The graduate students’ talks were based on their dissertation research.

Kubik’s paper was co-written with Micah J. Leamer (University of Nebraska) and Sather-Wagstaff and will appear in the Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra. Spicer’s paper was co-written with Jim Coykendall, NDSU professor of mathematics, and will appear in the proceedings of the American Mathematical Society. Nasseh’s paper also was co-written with Sather-Wagstaff and answers a 37-year old question of Vasconcelos. Coykendall and Sather-Wagstaff also gave research presentations in the ancillary mini-conference on factorization and zero divisor graphs.

NDSU Faculty Members’ Paper Selected as Best Paper | 3/31/2011

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Two NDSU faculty members have received notice that the paper they submitted has been selected as the best paper addressing the theme, “Organizational Leadership, Organizational Change, Institutional Effectiveness.”

Karen Froelich, NDSU associate professor of marketing and management and director of the master’s of business administration program, and Canan Bilen-Green, NDSU professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering and director of the FORWARD project, submitted the paper, “Creating a More Inclusive Academic Workplace.” The paper was submitted following their successful submission of a proposal for a conference session on the same topic at the 2011 Annual Conference of the Higher Learning Commission. The award for best paper includes a cash prize plus a certificate.

NDSU Professor Recognized by Society of Manufacturing Engineers | 3/31/2011

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — David L. Wells, professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering at NDSU, Fargo, is one of six individuals recognized by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers with a 2011 International Honor Award. The award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of manufacturing engineering in areas such as manufacturing technologies, technical writing, education, research, management and service to the society.

“SME is proud to pay tribute to these six individuals,” said Paul D. Bradley, the society’s 2011 president. “Through their diligent research efforts and technical achievements, they have each significantly contributed to advancing the manufacturing industry.”

The winners will be honored at the International Awards Gala, which will take place at the society’s Annual Conference, June 5-7, at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue in Bellevue, Wash. Wells will receive the Joseph A. Siegel Service Award for his significant and unique contributions to the society.

NDSU Grad Student Examines Ancient, Complex Game | 3/31/2011

March 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU mathematics doctoral student Lindsay (Merchant) Erickson is fascinated by the ancient game of Nim. A two-player pastime of combinatorial game theory, Nim's origins date hundreds of years ago in China.

"Nim is a game of perfect information, meaning that both players know what their opponent is doing at every step, and there are no elements of chance involved," Erickson explained, noting there is only one solution to the general game.

"Nim's not as difficult as mathematicians would like you to believe - I've taught the game to third graders. In fact, the only person to ever beat me in the general game of Nim is a third grader," said Erickson, who earned her bachelor's degree in mathematics at NDSU in 2006.

Now, Erickson has taken the game in a new direction, using graphs so the solution of the general game does not apply. Erickson's 60-page doctoral dissertation, "The Game of Nim on Graphs," demonstrates different solutions are dependent on the structure of the graphs. It's an intricate study of the complex game, with the goal to discover winning strategies and predict who will be the victor.

In her work, she extended the game to mathematical graphs such as complete graphs, Petersen graphs, hypercubes and bipartite graphs. Erickson assigned integer weight to each edge from a given vertex to correspond to the pile of stones used in an ordinary game of Nim. She took into account nearly every possible move and ended up putting her supporting materials on a CD, because the graphs would have filled a 2,000-page appendix.

An outstanding student, Erickson has received three National Science Foundation fellowships, a dissertation fellowship through the Graduate School and numerous scholarships. She also studied mathematics one summer in Hungary.

A native of Moorhead, Minn., Erickson will earn her doctorate in May. She hopes to find a post-doctoral position and eventually work at a research university.

NDSU Professor Publishes Book on Military Propaganda and Children | 3/28/2011

March 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Ross F. Collins, professor of communication at North Dakota State University, recently published the book "Children, War and Propaganda." Collins examines how modern U.S. propaganda influenced the activities of children during World War I and II. According to Collins, the military promoted their ideals and activities among children to reduce fear, build character, prepare for service and tangibly help the war effort.

The book is part of the Mediating American History series edited by David M. Copeland and aimed at scholars and students. The series includes a diverse range of works dealing with the mass media and its relationship to society.

Collins earned his doctorate in history from the University of Cambridge, Britain. He has published three books and many articles on the history of World War I, France and the American frontier. For more information on the book, visit http://www.childrenwarandpropaganda.com

NDSU Faculty Invited to Write Review for Pharmaceutical Journal | 3/28/2011

March 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, NDSU assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, has been invited to write a review article for the journal, Current Pharmaceutical Design. The article, "Advances in Biomarker Research for Pancreatic Cancer," will be published in a thematic issue focusing on targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer.

According to Wu and his co-authors, pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes for cancer-related deaths in the United States. The disease is diagnosed at its later stage because of the lack in early symptoms, which contributes to its high mortality. The only current curative approach to tackle this disease is by surgical resection. The complete removal of the tumor mass is difficult due to its invasive and metastatic nature. As a consequence, there is relapse because of drug resistance or presence of cancer stem cells that eventually leads to the death of patients. To improve the survival rate, early detection of pancreatic cancer is critical.

"This review aims to provide an overview of the biomarker research in pancreatic cancer. CA 19-9, a serum carbohydrate antigen, is the only biomarker available today with approximately 90 percent specificity to pancreatic cancer. However, routine use of CA 19-9 for assessing prognosis and monitoring patients with diagnosed pancreatic cancer is unproven at present. New biomarkers with high specificity to pancreatic cancer and advances in technologies for detecting these biomarkers are hence needed," Wu said. Kruttika Bhat, a doctoral student, and Fengfei Wang, research associate, both in Wu's lab at NDSU, share the first authorship for the article.

Current Pharmaceutical Design is published by Bentham Science Publishers and abstracted/indexed in a number of major abstracting/indexing agencies with Impact Factor: 4.414 (2009 SCI Journal Citation Reports), ranking 29th among 236 pharmacology and pharmacy journals. The "theme issues" contain reviews in important fields of current research activity, such as modern drug design including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, drug targets and disease mechanism, written by eminent experts in the field. The aim of the journal is to provide readers with comprehensive accounts of recent developments in the frontier areas of the field. For more information, visit http://benthamscience.com/cpd

NDSU Researchers Receive Competitive Coatings Award | 3/24/2011

March 24, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Two NDSU researchers have received a prestigious Roon Award at the 2011 CoatingsTech Conference, held March 14-16 in Rosemont, Ill.

Samim Alam, graduate student in the NDSU Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials, and Bret Chisholm, senior research scientist at the NDSU Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, received the first place award for their technical paper titled “Coatings Derived from Novel, Soybean Oil-Based Polymers Produced Using Living Carbocationic Polymerization.

Currently, organic chemicals are almost entirely derived from building blocks that are obtained from natural gas, petroleum, and coal. Since fossil resources are limited, there is an ongoing need to develop useful chemicals from renewable resources.

The research conducted by Samim Alam and Bret Chisholm focuses on a process developed to obtain vinylether-functional monomers containing fatty acid pendent groups directly from soybean oil, using base-catalyzed transesterification. Results demonstrated that the use of the soybean oil-derived vinylether monomers (polyVESFA) or its derivatives, in place of soybean oil or its derivatives, offers tremendous advantages in a variety of coating systems.

Based on the research results obtained by Alam and Chisholm, it appears that the novel soybean oil based polymer, polyVESFA, may have significant commercial potential in the coatings industry and the researchers have filed a provisional patent application. The North Dakota Soybean Council provided funding for the research.

The Roon Awards are considered one of the coatings industry’s highest technical achievements and are given for best technical papers submitted for consideration as part of the 2011 American Coatings Conference technical program.

NDSU Entomology Graduate Students Compete and Present at Conference | 3/24/2011

March 24, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — A team of NDSU entomology graduate students competed in the "Linnaean Games" entomological college quiz bowl competition at the 66th annual North Central Branch meeting of the Entomological Society of America. The conference was held March 13-16 in Minneapolis. In addition, two NDSU graduate students from the entomology department placed in the President's Prize for scientific presentations.

Msango Soko took second place in the master's competition with his oral paper, "Oviposition Preference and Larval Host Range of the Sugarbeet Root Maggot (Diptera: Ulidiidae)." Msango Soko is advised by Mark Boetel, NDSU associate professor of entomology. Kiran Ghising earned third place in the poster competition for his presentation, "Impact of Rag1 Aphid-resistant Soybeans on Binodoxys communis (Gahan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a Parasitoid of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)." Ghising is co-advised by Janet Knodel and Jason Harmon. Each award consisted of a cash prize and a certificate from the society in recognition of their achievements.

NDSU entomology has a reputation for performing well in the competition, having won the regional championship three times since 2002. At this competition, NDSU defeated the University of Kentucky (70-45) in the preliminary rounds, and fell to Michigan State University in the semifinals (30-80). "We were encouraged by the team's performance this year, and we're very optimistic about next year because we have a very young team. All of our team members were early-career students, competing against teams mostly comprised of Ph.D. students from large departments. The experience and knowledge our students gained this year will bring a lot of strength to the 2012 team," said Mark Boetel, associate professor of entomology.

Team members included Samantha Brunner (captain), Kondwani Msango Soko, Joseph Stegmiller and Rebecca Whalen. Jessica Fibelstad, an undergraduate zoology major, and Kiran Ghising served as alternates. The team was coached by Boetel and Gerald Fauske.

NDSU Animal Sciences Has Strong Showing at Midwest Meetings | 3/22/2011

March 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Students, faculty and staff from NDSU's Department of Animal Sciences were recognized at the Midwest meetings of the American Society of Animal Science/Dairy Science March 14-16 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Kimberly Vonnahme, NDSU associate professor of animal sciences, was named Outstanding Young Animal Scientist in the research category. She was recognized for her achievements in developing a nationally recognized research program in the area of reproductive physiology.

Sarah Wagner, NDSU associate professor of animal sciences, was named as the Outstanding Young Animal Scientist in the teaching category. She was recognized for her achievements in developing the large animal minor in the veterinary technology program.

Members of the NDSU Quadrathlon team (Beth Hendrickx from Bowman, N.D., Nathan Hayes from Big Lake, Minn., Quynn Larson from Brandon, S.D., and Phil Steichen from Ulen, Minn.) placed first in oral presentation and written exam and second place overall. The squad competed against 15 teams from universities throughout the Midwest. The team's adviser is Kasey Carlin, assistant professor of animal sciences.

NDSU graduate student Allison Meyer and Bryan Neville, assistant animal scientist, were recognized as Animal Science Young Scholars. This award recognizes students who are in the process of completing their doctoral program or who have recently completed their degree.

NDSU senior Phil Steichen also presented a paper, "Effect of feeding high sulfur vs. high crude protein diets on heifer growth and performance," in the undergraduate oral competition.

J.W. Schroeder, NDSU associate professor and Extension dairy specialist, chaired the graduate student poster competition and Eric Berg, associate professor of animal sciences, chaired the Growth, Development, Muscle Biology and Meat Science Section.

Greg Lardy, NDSU department head and professor, was recognized for his service as Midwest ASAS ADSA director.

David Buchanan, NDSU professor of animal sciences, and Lardy also presented invited papers. Buchanan's paper was titled "Teaching techniques for enhancing the learning experience of today's students: Engaging Students" and was presented in the Teaching Symposium. Lardy's paper was titled "You got the interview, now what? Part 1: Tips on interviewing for a graduate assistantship successfully," which was presented in the Graduate Student Symposium.

NDSU animal sciences students, staff and faculty wrote or co-wrote six poster presentations and seven oral presentations at the meetings.

NDSU’s Wolf-Hall Part of National Team Awarded $1.5 Million USDA Grant | 3/21/2011

March 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Charlene Wolf-Hall, NDSU professor of veterinary and microbiological sciences and assistant dean for the Graduate School, is part of a collaborative team that has been awarded a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative for addressing critical and emerging food safety issues.

The title of the five-year project is "Risk Assessment and Intervention Strategies for the Emerging Food Safety Threat of Ochratoxin in the United States." Other scientists involved with the project include Dojin Ryu from Texas Women's University, Jack Cappozzo from the National Center for Food Safety and Technology at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Lauren Jackson from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jeffrey Palumbo from the Western Regional Research Center of the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Jayne Stratton and Andreia Bianchini from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and Felicia Wu from the University of Pittsburg.

According to Wolf-Hall, several toxigenic fungi in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium are known to contaminate agricultural crops and produce ochratoxin A (OTA), a possible human carcinogen. OTA has been associated with nephropathic diseases in animals and humans, and its nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, immunosuppressive, mutagenic and teratogenic potency has been shown in animal studies. Due to diverse growth characteristics, the toxigenic fungi and OTA have been found in an exceptionally wide variety of agricultural commodities worldwide, including cereal grains, nuts, dried fruits, spices, meat, milk and many processed foods made from these commodities such as wine, beer, infant formula and baby foods. Most studies of OTA in food have been conducted in European countries where OTA levels are regulated. Currently, no regulation for OTA in foods has been set in the U.S. and there is an urgent need for up-to-date information on the incidence and levels of OTA due to international trade and consumer demand.

The project will include conducting a comprehensive national survey followed by health risk assessment of foodborne OTA to the general public and high-risk populations, and will investigate effective strategies to reduce exposure to OTA.

NDSU Cereal Science Paper is 'Editor's Pick' | 3/21/2011

March 21, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Harkanwal Sandhu, doctoral candidate in the NDSU cereal science graduate program; his adviser, Frank Manthey, professor in plant sciences; and co-authors Senay Simsek, assistant professor of plant sciences, and Jae-Bom Ohm, USDA-ARS, Wheat Quality Laboratory, Fargo, published a paper in Cereal Chemistry titled "Comparison Between Potassium Bromate and Ozone as Flour Oxidants in Breadmaking."

During bread baking, potassium bromate is converted to potassium bromide. Any residual potassium bromate in bread is considered to be unhealthy. The article presents evidence that ozone treated flour can be used as a replacement for potassium bromate. The paper was the Cereal Chemistry Editor's Pick and was the second most accessed paper from Cereal Chemistry Online in February.

Science Café at NDSU presents 'Who Believes in Global Warming … and Why?' | 3/16/2011

March 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — "Who Believes in Global Warming … and Why?" is the next Science Café scheduled for Tuesday, April 12, at 7 p.m. in Stoker's Basement in the Hotel Donaldson, downtown Fargo.

In this presentation, Allan Ashworth, University Distinguished Professor of geology at NDSU, will discuss research findings that persuade him global warming is here and that humans have contributed to the problem. Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Math and professor of psychology at NDSU, will share research that indicates enormous group differences in whether people "believe" in the problem of global warming.

The Science Café will conclude with both presenters discussing with the audience why the group differences exist and how to close the gap in beliefs about global warming.

NDSU Professor Kalpana Katti to Present Faculty Lecture | 3/15/2011

March 15, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Kalpana Katti, distinguished professor of civil engineering at NDSU, has been selected to present the 52nd annual Faculty Lecture on Tuesday, April 5, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Century Theater. Considered one of the most prestigious of NDSU's awards, the lectureship recognizes sustained professional excellence in teaching, scholarly achievement and service. In her lecture, " Engineering the Biology: The Final Frontier," Katti will discuss how nature forms the inspiration for developing new materials, such as creating engineered bone that is identical to human bone in form and function. By joining engineering, mechanics, materials, biology and basic science, researchers are going where they have never been before. As Katti puts it, "The final frontier is engineering the biological world." The lecture and reception in the Plains Room are free and open to the public.

Since joining NDSU in 1997, Katti has developed advanced materials laboratories to support research in nanotechnology and tissue engineering. Katti teaches courses in biomaterials, which are used in biomedical research, and nanotechnology. With research rooted in advanced composites, nanocomposites and biomedical engineering, she envisions a future where engineering and the sciences unite for unprecedented benefits to society.

Katti earned her bachelor's degree at the University of New Delhi, India; master's degree in solid state physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India; and doctorate in material science and engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Her honors include the Peltier Award for Innovations in Teaching, College of Engineering Researcher of the Year, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and Federation of Societies of Coatings Technology Roon Award. Her vita includes six books or book chapters, 61 journal papers, 55 peer reviewed conference papers and 33 technical invited talks. She has served as a paper reviewer for 20 journals. Since 2000, her research grants have totaled about $4 million. Katti reviews scientific proposals to federal agencies in the United States, Chile, Europe and New Zealand.

NDSU Human Development & Education Faculty Publish and Present | 3/10/2011

March 10, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU College of Human Development and Education faculty continue to publish research and generate presentations in their fields.

An article titled "Folic Acid Every Day: A Educational Intervention for Women of Childbearing Age" by Julie Garden-Robinson, NDSU associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, and Kimberly Beauchamp, graduate student in the communication department, was published in the February 2011 issue of the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Research conducted by Margaret Fitzgerald, associate professor of human development and family science, and her colleague, Glen Muske, was discussed in the Wall Street Journal.

Kevin Miller, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. The article addressed the effects of increasing electrical stimulation frequency on cramp duration. Research observations indicated that increasing electrical stimulation frequency also increased cramp duration. Thus, if clinicians want to study the effectiveness of various cramp strategies, they can increase stimulation frequency to generate a cramp that lasts long enough to study the effectiveness of the treatment.

Miller also was interviewed by Richard Scott, a producer for a New Zealand radio program called "This Way Up" that explores the things humans use and consume. The interview related to Miller's research on muscle cramping and pickle juice. They heard about Miller's research from the interview given to Peter Smith published at  www.good.is/post/how-pickle-juice-changed-the-world-of-sports-food-innovations-from-the-football-field/.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family science, published a paper with, Chris Swenson, MS '06, titled "Links from teacher beliefs to peer victimization and bystander intervention: Tests of mediating processes" in the Journal of Early Adolescence. Swenson is a therapist at Centennial Mental Health in Colorado.

Chuck Fountaine, PhD '08 and an assistant professor at South Dakota State University; his adviser Gary Liguori, NDSU assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences; Arupendra Mozumdar, adjunct faculty; and John Schuna Jr., wellness doctoral student, had their manuscript, "Physical Activity and Screen Time Sedentary Behaviors in College Students," accepted for publication in the International Journal of Exercise Science.

Twenty-one students majoring in health education accompanied Judy Ary, senior lecturer of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, to the 31st annual Minnesota School Health Education Conference in Bloomington, Minn. The conference provides health educators with effective lessons and strategies focusing on the achievement of national, state and local school health education learner outcomes.

David Silkenat, assistant professor of education, received word that his book, "Moment of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina," was published by UNC Press.

Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and Kelly Sassi, assistant professor in English, were informed that their manuscript, "An Ethical Dilemma:  Talking About Plagiarism and Academic Integrity in the Digital Age," will be published in the July 2011 issue of English Journal, themed "Ethics in the English Classroom."

In February, Liz Erichsen, assistant professor in the School of Education, published the article "Fostering Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research in Adult Education: Interactive Resource Guides and Tools" in SAGE Open with Cheryl Goldenstein from the University of Wyoming.

Marie C. Desaulniers Miller; Lisa M. Montplaisir, assistant professor of biological sciences; Erika G. Offerdahl, assistant professor of chemistry; Fu-Chih Cheng, assistant professor of statistics; and Gerald L. Ketterling, assistant professor of education, learned their article, "Comparison of Views of the Nature of Science between Natural Science and Nonscience Majors," will be published in CBE Life Sci Educ 2010: 45-54 and will be featured in the Highlights issue of the journal. To view the paper in its original publication, visit www.lifescied.org/cgi/reprint/9/1/45.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, had his paper, "The prevalence and characteristics of wellness programs and centers at two and four year colleges and universities," accepted for publication in the Recreational Sports Journal. The paper also was nominated for the Article of Distinction Award.

Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of dietetics, co-wrote "Effect of Nutrition facts panel and ingredient declaration on customer satisfaction and perception of nutrition," which was published in the Journal of Food Service Business Research. Stastny and Julie Garden-Robinson co-wrote "Eating for Your Eyes" which was published in theJournal of Nutrition Education Behavior.

Gary Liguori, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, has been selected to review research abstracts for the 139th American Public Health Annual Meeting (Food and Nutrition track) in 2011.

Mary Ollor Onungwe, a clinical mental health counselor and doctoral student, wrote a review on "Groups: Process and Practice, Eighth Edition" by Marianne Schneider Corey, Gerald Corey and Cindy Corey. The review was featured in Counseling Today.

Kristen Benson, assistant professor in human development and family science, has been invited by Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Ore., as a visiting scholar this summer to teach couple and family therapy students an intensive course on working with transgender clients.

NDSU Council for Interior Design Accreditation Self-Study Presentation - covering the interior design program's self-study process completed in preparation for accreditation site visit fall 2009 will be presented by Susan Ray-Degges, associate professor of apparel, design and hospitality management, at the Council for Interior Design Accreditation Workshop in Denver during the Interior Designers Educators Council's International Meeting on March 16. Council for Interior Design Accreditation is the national accreditation agency for interior design programs.

NDSU Professor Selected for Chamber of Commerce Honor | 3/9/2011

March 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Herbert Snyder, associate professor of accounting and information systems, has been selected to receive the Chamber of Commerce Distinguished Faculty Service Award, formerly known as the Chamber of Commerce Distinguished Professor Award. Snyder joined the NDSU faculty in 2003 and is considered one of the leading forensic accounting educators in the country. He has written two books, more than 30 refereed articles and given numerous conference presentations.

"The Chamber Distinguished Faculty Service Award Committee was very impressed with Dr. Snyder's exemplary record of accomplishments," said R.S. Krishnan, associate vice president for academic affairs and committee chair. He said Snyder will be recognized during NDSU's Celebration of Faculty Excellence on April 28 at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Center.

"Dr. Snyder is one of the pre-eminent fraud educators in the United States," wrote William Bowlin, professor and head of accounting, finance and information systems, and James Clifton, assistant professor of accounting practice, in a letter of nomination. "Herbert Snyder embodies the best aspects of what a faculty member at NDSU should be. He excels in the classroom, service to student learning and scholarly work."

In 2005, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners honored him with the Hubbard Award for the outstanding paper in fraud research. He was named the Accounting Professor of the Year by the NDSU Accounting Club and received NDSU's Peltier Award for Innovative Teaching. He also has received awards from the Institute of Management Accountants and is a member of the editorial board of Fraud Magazine. A Fulbright Scholar in the Ukraine during 2003, Snyder also received the 2008 Innovation in Accounting Education Award from the American Accounting Association. In 2010, he was recognized with the Fraud Educator of the Year Award by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners and the Innovation in Business Education Award by the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business.

Snyder earned his bachelor's degree at Babson College and his doctorate in information transfer from Syracuse University.

NDSU Students Discover that Studying the Past Leads to Their Future:
Group’s Research Uncovers Rare Artifact in South Pacific | 3/8/2011

March 8, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Summer on a tropical island in the Pacific sounded like a great idea to eight undergraduate and two graduate students from North Dakota State University studying anthropology. Led by Dr. Jeffrey Clark, professor of anthropology at NDSU, the students gain valuable knowledge in their field, experiencing both adventure and a few surprises during their month-long field research in American Samoa. Some of the students, along with a new group of students, are returning to the islands in 2011.

More than 6,000 miles from Fargo, N.D., American Samoa includes a group of five islands in western Polynesia in the South Pacific.  For Allison Aakre, a senior from Hawley, Minn., majoring in anthropology, the research experience provided valuable hands-on learning. “Not only did I learn proper field research techniques, but I learned a lot about myself on this trip.”

Worth the Wait
For Dr. Clark, who hadn’t been back to American Samoa since 1999, the trip with his students was worth the wait. The NDSU research group unearthed ancient stone tools, ornaments, fishhooks, shells, rocks and one very unexpected find. “I’ve never excavated anything like it,” said Clark, an archaeologist for more than 30 years.

What the NDSU student researchers discovered was a single large clay pot used for cooking, completely intact. “Nothing like that has ever been found in that region of the world,” said Dr. Clark.

“We conducted the excavation of the pot with dental picks, a 2-inch soft brush and a small wood splint until it was completely exposed,” said NDSU student Clayton Knudson, of Harvey, N.D.

The moisture-saturated clay prevented removing the pot as one solid unit, as it began to fragment. All pieces, known as sherds, were carefully removed, numbered and shipped back to Fargo, N.D., with 18 boxes of artifacts for further study. Students in the archaeology lab at NDSU are working painstakingly to reconstruct the pot, but the poor condition of the sherds will limit what can be done. Clark will use a laser scanner in his lab to create 3-D models of the intact sherds that will allow creation of a digital 3-D model of the pot. Though radiocarbon dating has yet to confirm the age of the clay pot, Clark estimates the rare artifact may be as much as 2,500 years old, placing at about 700 B.C.

For NDSU graduate student Seth Quintus of Dickinson, N.D., the field research in American Samoa provides the basis of his master’s thesis in anthropology. “The most striking thing you learn when on these islands is the adaptability of the people,” said Quintus. “The second thing I learned is how important the modern day people are to any archaeological study, especially in Samoa. They not only can serve to help in interpreting some of the data, but their enthusiasm can encourage and motivate you as a researcher,” said Quintus.  He and other students know that it is also important to share their research findings with the Samoan people, who may learn more about their cultural heritage as interpreted from archaeological data.

Dr. Clark agrees that such appreciation and understanding of another culture are benefits of this type of educational experience. “They get, I think, a little more understanding of the human connection, what we share, as well as the ways in which we’re different. That’s the heart of anthropology—how people are different and how people are similar over time and space.”

Jamie Pullen, a senior from Fargo majoring in anthropology, appreciated the experience. “The society is similar, yet so different from our own, and the people and their culture have had to find a delicate balance between progress and respect.”

Students’ Journeys Just Beginning
Though they are back from last summer’s field research in the South Pacific, these students’ journeys are just beginning. Lab work, scientific papers and presentations to announce the group’s research findings follow the field experience in American Samoa.
 
Allison Aakre is working in Dr. Clark’s lab recording, cleaning, measuring, and photographing artifacts to build a database of the group’s discoveries from last summer. She says the field research taught her proper excavation techniques, how to survey a large area and the importance of interacting with local populations. Aakre will graduate in May and is interested in pursuing her master’s degree in anthropology, with a focus on Pacific archaeology.
 
Clayton Knudson graduated in December and will be working in Yosemite National Park starting this summer, doing archaeological survey. He’ll hike into the park interior for days at a time, searching for and recording archaeological sites. Knudson, who previously served eight years in the U.S. Army with tours of duty in Iraq, South Korea and Egypt, provided valuable navigation and medical first aid skills while in American Samoa, along with an ability to improvise to get things done. All are skills that Clark calls extremely valuable to the group of students while conducting research on remote islands.
 
Jamie Pullen says the experience added to his global outlook. “It opened my eyes to a much larger world beyond my immediate environment and sparked my interest to travel further.”
 
Seth Quintus and Dr. Clark will attend the international 2011 Lapita Pacific Archaeology Conference in Samoa in June after the upcoming field research in American Samoa this summer. Quintus will then continue traveling to a remote set of islands known as the Tokelau group for additional field research. He hopes to pursue a doctorate degree in anthropology, eventually working in higher education.

Most of the students have worked in the archaeology lab at NDSU before or after the field research project.

NDSU Plant Sciences Professor Receives Award | 3/8/2011

March 8, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Senay Simsek, assistant professor in plant sciences at NDSU, received the NC-213 Andersons Cereal and Oil Seeds 2011 Early-in Career Award of Excellence during the Multi-state Project NC-212 annual meeting (NC-213 - The U.S. Quality Grains Research Consortium). The award recognizes "individuals early in their careers whose work has significantly contributed to improvements in science, innovation, technology implementation, policy formation and/or education related to quality of cereals and oilseeds from processing to consumption and who show outstanding promise of continuing those contributions into the future."

Simsek is responsible for directing hard spring wheat quality and carbohydrate chemistry related research activities.

NC-213 includes engineers, scientists and economists from leading U.S. land grant universities and government research centers that investigate and disseminate technical knowledge concerning the marketing and delivery of quality grains and bioprocess co-products.

NDSU Faculty Publishes Book on Tourists' Experiences at Memorial Sites | 3/8/2011

March 8, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Joy Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of anthropology at NDSU, published "Heritage That Hurts: Tourists in the Memoryscapes of September 11" in mid-February.

In the book, Sather-Wagstaff argues memorial sites are public spaces that are continuously negotiated, constructed and reconstructed into culturally meaningful landscapes through various performative activities. These activities are not limited to formal commemorative acts but also include tourists' activities and experiences at memorial sites and post-travel. Sather-Wagstaff's primary focus is on the former site of the World Trade Center in New York. This site-in-process is compared to other sites, including the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Vietnam Veterans Memorial. She demonstrates how tourists are critical to constructing memorial sites as broadly significant, rather than diminishing their social importance and in doing so, challenges existing academic theories on what is called "dark tourism."

The book is the fourth volume published in the Left Coast Press Heritage, Tourism and Community series.

Million-Dollar Grant Awarded to Research Start-Up Company Founded by NDSU Computer Science Professor | 3/4/2011

March 4, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a two-year, $1.08 million competitive grant award to Dr. Brian Slator, North Dakota State University computer science professor, for his faculty start-up venture known as WoWiWe (pronounced Wow’ ee) Instruction Co. The group develops internet-based educational software. The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant through NIH’s National Center for Research Resources will be used to develop a multi-user virtual biology environment for discovery-oriented science education. The award includes $369,276 for NDSU’s Center for Science and Mathematics Education, led by Dr. Donald Schwert, professor of geosciences.

While Hollywood film crews create blockbusters with Academy Award-winning animation software, a team of researchers at NDSU develops software that creates virtual worlds to teach science. For a generation of students whose daily existence is tethered to the Internet, the World Wide Web Instructional Committee at NDSU has developed unique methods to reach them. Slator established the WoWiWe research start-up company to commercialize educational simulation games developed by NDSU’s World Wide Web Instructional Committee.

The virtual worlds created by these educational software developers transport students inside cells, helping them learn complex biology. Students seamlessly enter a virtual world to become scientists: performing experiments, interacting with the world and with each other, applying the scientific method. “This approach represents the notion of learning by doing,” explains Slator. “You are having experiences in the role of a scientist.”

The grant award will make it possible for Slator and his team to produce educational software that helps students grasp complex biological concepts. The resulting software products will be targeted toward parents and high school students who want to better prepare for college-level science courses. Brad Vender, who received his master’s degree in computer science from NDSU, serves as principal investigator on the grant award.

Through NDSU’s Center for Science and Mathematics Education, graduate students in computer science and Dr. Tariq King, assistant professor in computer science, will provide software engineering expertise and testing of the educational software products being developed.

WoWiWe, Slator’s start-up company, stems from a decade of educational media research at NDSU, which includes the web-based Virtual Cell Lab. The simulation game and related animations transport students into virtual worlds that help them learn cell structure, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mRNA processing and other cellular and molecular operations. The Virtual Cell has received recognition in Science magazine, the journal Cell Biology Education and the National Science Foundation Discoveries, as well as first place in the education division from the South Beach International Animation Festival.

Virtual Cell represents a portion of the worlds created by the World Wide Web Instructional Committee at NDSU, an eclectic group of educational disciplines including geosciences, computer science, anthropology, education, statistics, and cell biology. Through a variety of online educational software, students discover geology, explore archaeological digs or operate a virtual retail store to learn about business and economics.

As WoWiWe Co. enters its next phase of research and development, it is planning to locate in NDSU’s Business Technology Incubator, working to create seven educational software modules.  “We try to make the learning engaging and keep the fun in learning,” said Slator.

More information:
WoWiWe Co. - http://www.wowiwe.net/
NDSU Center for Science and Mathematics Education - http://www.ndsu.edu/csme/
NDSU World Wide Web Instructional Committee – http://wwwic.ndsu.edu/

From Rome to Beijing to Fargo: Global Physics Conference to be Held at NDSU | 3/1/2011

March 1, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — North Dakota State University will be the site of an international physics conference to be held Aug. 8-12 at NDSU’s Barry Hall. The Discrete Simulation of Fluid Dynamics (DSFD) 20th International Conference will include attendees from more than 14 countries, according to Alexander Wagner, conference organizer and associate professor of physics at NDSU. Visit http://dsfd.org for more info and to register.

At this conference, most recently held in Rome and Beijing, distinguished international attendees will discuss physics, mathematics and engineering topics among leaders in the field. Fluid mechanics is the study of fluids and the forces on them. Fluid dynamics focuses on the science of fluids in motion. Such concepts are valuable in fields as varied as engineering, hemodynamics (blood flow), flow in porous media (oil recovery), or in sports performance, such as swimming to determine how swimmers can move faster through water.

The Fargo conference focuses on the theory and applications of simulation methods for Fluid Mechanics that, in contrast to traditional Computational Fluid Dynamics methods, are derived from a microscopic model. These methods continue to increase in popularity because of the simplicity of the algorithms and their suitability for high performance parallel computations.

DSFD conferences have emerged as the premiere forum for researchers in the field, and many exciting new discoveries in lattice models of fluid dynamics have been first announced at DSFD conferences.

Invited conference presenters include:
·      Dr. Ronojoy Adhikari, Chennai Institute of Technology, Chennai, India
·      Dr. Luca Biferale, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
·      Dr. Michael E. Cates, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
·      Dr. Aleksandar Donev, New York University, New York, N.Y.
·      Dr. Burkhard Dünweg, Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung, Mainz, Germany
·      Dr. Guiseppe Gonnella, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
·      Dr. Jari Hyvaluoma, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
·      Dr. Raymond Kapral, University of Toronto; Toronto, Ontario, Canada
·      Dr. George Karniadakis, Brown University, Providence R.I.
·      Dr. Tony Ladd, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
·      Dr. Ron Larson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
·      Dr. Jeffrey Morris, The City College of New York, New York, N.Y.
·      Dr. Stefano Ubertini, University of Naples, Parthenope, Naples, Italy
·      Dr. Stuart D. C. Walsh, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.

Visit http://www.dsfd.org for more info and to register. Discounted early registration is available until March 15.

NDSU Research & Technology Park Offers Entrepreneurship Academy for Youth | 2/28/2011

February 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Students in Fargo, West Fargo and Moorhead high schools will have an opportunity to learn hands-on about entrepreneurship this summer thanks to the NDSU Research & Technology Park.

Students in grades 11 and 12 (school year 2011-12) who demonstrate an aptitude in math, science and technology and have an interest in entrepreneurship can apply to attend the five-day, technology-focused Entrepreneurship Academy at NDSU June 12-17.

NDSU Research & Technology Park staff will lead the academy with critical assistance from industry leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Students will work in teams with a simple business case to determine the best way for the business to compete, identify capital needs to start the business and devise a plan for managing the business successfully.

Participants will be provided with business cases, two days of instruction and necessary materials for successful completion of the program. On the final day, teams will give a 15-minute "investor pitch" to a panel of judges in a business plan competition setting. The top two teams with the most solid business strategy and potential for success will be awarded tuition vouchers to NDSU.

Primary sponsors for the academy include the South East Educational Cooperative and Fargo, West Fargo and Moorhead school districts. Many local businesses contributed to the effort to interest high school students in business and entrepreneurship in the community.

The academy has a $50 registration fee. If a student's family is unable to pay, waivers for the fee are available.

For more information about the Entrepreneurship Academy, contact Paul Tefft at 701-499-3628 or paul@ndsuresearchpark.comor Jen Katke at 701-499-3600 or jennifer@ndsuresearchpark.com.

NDSU Faculty Paper Accepted to Accounting Journal | 2/28/2011

February 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — David Herda, NDSU assistant professor of accounting, has been notified his manuscript, "The Effects of Organizational Fairness and Commitment on the Extent of Benefits Big Four Alumni Provide their Former Firm," has been accepted for publication in Accounting, Organizations and Society, an international journal devoted to the behavioral, organizational and social aspects of accounting.

In the paper, Herda and co-author James Lavelle from University of Texas at Arlington examine why some big four alumni choose to benefit their former firm (post-employment citizenship) more than others. Grounded in social exchange theory, they find organizational fairness predicts perceived organizational support, which in turn, predicts organizational commitment. Organizational commitment predicts post-employment citizenship and perceived organizational support and organizational commitment partially mediate the positive relationship between organizational fairness and post-employment citizenship. The contributions, limitations and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

NDSU Faculty Paper Accepted to Business and Economics Journal | 2/22/2011

February 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Fariz Huseynov, assistant professor of finance at NDSU, has been notified his co-written manuscript, "Tax Policy and Macro-Finance in a Competitive Global Economy Where Government is Considered as Firm's Third Financial Stakeholder," has been accepted for publication in Global Business and Economics Review. The international refereed journal presents, discusses and analyzes advanced concepts, initial treatments and fundamental research in all fields of business and economics.

The authors propose a macro-financial model to be included with traditional financial macroeconomic theory postulating that economic activity results from aggregate effects of all domestic private and public saving and investment, net international trade, inter-country capital flows and consumption decisions. They modify Modigliani and Miller's capital structure propositions by adding government as the third major financial stakeholder where government possesses a stake in the firm because of the potential, just as stockholders, to receive future cash flows.

"We posit a 'conservation of value' where capital structure and domestic tax structure have no effect on total firm value; however, affect relative stakeholder values, discount rates, capital investment and flow of capital into and out of a country," Huseynov wrote. "We also develop an intertemporal model that allows for reinvestment of retained earnings and firm growth. Changes in tax structure, capital structure and dividend policy in the intertemporal model affect a firm's growth rate and its aggregate value as well as distribution of value across stakeholders. We observe that corporate taxes potentially have a greater impact on a firm's level of capital investment and resulting growth than personal taxes. At the aggregate, corporate taxes may also affect a country's level of capital formation and economic growth."

Next NDSU Science Café Addresses Bullying | 2/22/2011

February 22, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — "Bullying: What Do We Know, How Do We Know it, and What We Can Do?" is the title of the next NDSU Science Café scheduled for Tuesday, March 8, at 7 p.m. in Stoker's Basement in the Hotel Donaldson, downtown Fargo.

Media attention on bullying has increased in recent months as a number of suicides have highlighted the significant impact harassment from peers can have on children's health, well-being and safety. This has led to a great deal of information, and misinformation, being presented to the public. How prevalent is bullying exactly? How does it occur? Who is most at risk and what are the consequences for children's and adolescents' development?

Wendy Troop-Gordon, assistant professor of psychology at NDSU, will discuss how researchers study bullying and will provide an overview of what investigators have learned, including some of her recent findings from data collected in North Dakota and Minnesota. Discussion will focus on what we can do to prevent bullying and help youth who are victimized by peers.

NDSU Reaches Top National Rank of Carnegie Commission on Higher Education | 2/16/2011

February 16, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — North Dakota State University has joined the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity”. View the complete list.

“The Carnegie Commission announcement is an exciting recognition of NDSU’s emerging national status,” said NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani, noting the university’s annual research expenditures, as measured by the National Science Foundation, exceeded $114 million in 2008 and are anticipated to exceed that in upcoming 2009 NSF rankings. “NDSU is a student-focused, land-grant, research institution that has reached a level of contribution to our state and country on par with the nation’s best universities. We are honored by the Carnegie Foundation’s acknowledgement of our achievements, and the opportunity for a North Dakota university to join the nation’s most sought after higher education classification.”

The Carnegie classifications were developed in 1970, and dramatically revised in 2005, which is the last time the lists were updated. According to the Carnegie website, the classifications “provide the framework in which institutional diversity in U.S. higher education is commonly described. It is now the leading taxonomy of all accredited colleges and universities in the United States, currently developed using nationally available data from the U.S. Office of Postsecondary Education, the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, the National Science Foundation and the College Board.”

According to the foundation, the classifications “are intended to group institutions into meaningful, analytically manageable categories in order to allow researchers to make reasonable comparisons among similar institutions.”

Other universities in the “Very High Research Activity” category include Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Georgetown University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Princeton University, Stanford University, Texas A&M University, University of Minnesota, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Notre Dame, University of Southern California, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University and Yale University.

Patented Data Mining Technology Created at NDSU Licensed to Treeminer, Inc. | 2/9/2011

February 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– A novel vertical data mining method developed at NDSU offers significant accuracy and scalability advantages over current methods. University Distinguished Professor Dr. William Perrizo and his team at North Dakota State University (NDSU), Fargo, have developed a technology tool to help government and businesses quickly process massive data sets. Treeminer, Inc., announced today that it has concluded a license agreement with the NDSU Research Foundation (NDSU/RF).  The agreement gives Treeminer exclusive rights to further develop, market, and sell the patented, award-winning data mining solutions developed at NDSU by Dr. Perrizo. Treeminer will begin select demonstrations of the technology in the first quarter of 2011.

The amount of data available to businesses and governments is growing far faster than their ability to analyze the information. Significant advantage can be gained by being able to quickly make sense of millions or even billions of pieces of data, and applying the resulting knowledge. By organizing data vertically and then compressing it into a patented data structure called a pTree (predicate tree), dramatic reductions in analysis times can be gained over existing methods. Applications for the data mining technology based on pTree algorithms range from defense and intelligence to satellite image analysis, agriculture, computer network security, medical diagnostics, bioinformatics, resource allocation and many more.

“Today, data mining vendors are asking their customers to make trade-offs between the speed of analysis and its accuracy,” observed Mark Silverman, CEO of Treeminer, Inc. “The truly novel approach taken by the team at NDSU enables incredibly dramatic decreases in analysis time while actually improving the accuracy of the analysis. We think that data mining technology will be a critical, fundamental building block technology across the information technology spectrum, and have formed the world’s first Vertical Data Mining Company to bring this technology to a large and growing market.”

Dr. William Perrizo, NDSU distinguished professor of computer science, developed the patented algorithms and software on which the technology is based. “In the information science sphere, new approaches can sometimes effect increases in both the speed and accuracy of knowledge discovery. The pTree technology is an example of that,” said Perrizo.

Representatives from the NDSU Research Foundation introduced Dr. Perrizo’s work in data mining to Silverman, the entrepreneur who founded Treeminer. “Online analysis of large databases demands analysis that happens in seconds instead of hours,” according to Silverman.

The technology developed by Dr. Perrizo and his team represents approximately a 15-year effort in data mining research. “Efforts such as Dr. Perrizo’s illustrate the expertise available at NDSU that contributes to the body of knowledge in many areas, and contributes to the strength and vitality of state and national economic interests,” said NDSU President Dean Bresciani. “We congratulate Bill and his team on reaching this milestone,” said Bresciani.

With the technology licensed to Treeminer, Inc., data mining operations on the pTree structure generated from large databases means data analysis becomes blazingly fast. The algorithms and software patented by Dr. Perrizo efficiently, accurately and elegantly mine the data for useful information, like an archeologist sifting through the dust to uncover hidden treasures.

The data is turned on its head, sliced up to change it into a vertical structure resulting in long, skinny pieces of data that are then compressed into a pTree to better manage it. “That wouldn’t be all that useful if you had to uncompress every time you wanted to process the information. But we don’t. We can process the compressed pTrees,” said Dr. Perrizo.  This approach enabled Dr. Perrizo to win the prestigious 2006 Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining Cup in solving what had been once characterized as the “Holy Grail” of Computer Aided Detection (CAD) in medicine. Perrizo’s team on software development for pTree technology includes Dr. Greg Wettstein, chief computational scientist and principal engineer for Research Computing Services at NDSU. “Dr. Wettstein is one of the best systems programmers in the world today and we are fortunate to have him on this team,” said Perrizo.

“The coordinated efforts among NDSU researchers, the university’s Technology Transfer Office and the NDSU Research Foundation help lay the groundwork for commercialization of discoveries developed at NDSU,” noted Philip Boudjouk, vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer.

The NDSU Research Foundation’s technology and licensing income from NDSU research discoveries has grown from $1.20 million in fiscal year 2006 to $1.88 million in fiscal year 2010. NDSU inventors, colleges and departments actively involved in developing innovations share in net revenue distributed by the Research Foundation.

“We are thrilled to see Dr. Perrizo’s important work reach the market,” said Dale Zetocha, executive director of the NDSU Research Foundation. “It represents a great opportunity to commercialize this research.”

About Treeminer, Inc.
Treeminer, Annapolis, Md., is addressing a rapidly emerging challenge in data mining and analysis – the gap between the growing volume and granularity of data, and the lack of scalability of current data mining methods.  Treeminer’s patented and award winning Vertical Data Mining technology has shown the ability to address this gap by dropping analysis time from hours to almost instantaneous, by analyzing data vertically, rather than row by row as existing methods operate. Initially focused on the security, defense and intelligence segments, Treeminer is bringing to market a range of data mining solutions based upon vertical techniques, including classification and association rule mining methods.  www.treeminer.com

About NDSU
With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, North Dakota State University, Fargo, links academics to opportunities. As a metropolitan land grant institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities without a medical school in the U.S., based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects. www.ndsu.edu

About the NDSU Research Foundation
The NDSU Research Foundation is an independent, not-for-profit organization that supports NDSU in its teaching, research and public service missions. The Foundation manages the intellectual properties developed by faculty, staff and students doing research at NDSU and facilitates commercialization of these technologies. www.ndsuresearchfoundation.org

NDSU Faculty to Publish Pancreatic Cancer Research | 2/9/2011

February 9, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "Relationship between neural alteration and perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer patients with hyperglycemia," which has been selected for publication by PLoS ONE online journal.

According to the authors, patients with higher levels of fasting serum glucose have higher death rates from pancreatic cancer compared to patients with lower levels of fasting serum glucose. However, the reasons have not been studied. The goal of the current study was to examine the neural alterations in pancreatic cancer patients with hyperglycemia and to identify the relationship between the neural alterations and perineural invasion (PNI).

"In this study, we present the neural alteration and extent of PNI in the primary tumors of pancreatic cancer (PanCa) patients in the context of glucose control. Our data suggest that hyperglycemia, a common confounding factor associated with PanCa, may contribute to PNI. We demonstrated that patients with hyperglycemia display reduced expression of Myelin PO protein, and elevated expression of nerve growth factor and p75 in comparison to the patients with euglycemia. Furthermore, tumors from patients with hyperglycemia showed an elevation in the stage of PNI in comparison to tumors from the patients with euglycemia," senior author Wu said. "We have recently established a close collaboration with Dr. Qingyong Ma's laboratory at Xi'an Jiaotong University, China, in elucidating the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, a fatal disease."

PLoS ONE, which is produced by the Public Library of Science, is described as "an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication." It features reports of original research from all disciplines in science and medicine. By not excluding papers on the basis of subject area, PLoS ONE facilitates connections between papers within or between disciplines (www.plosone.org). During the past three years, Wu has published three papers in this journal (see previous news: www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/4587).

Wu's laboratory research interests include tumor therapeutic targets, drug discovery and biomarkers.  Both Wu and Wang joined NDSU in December 2008. Prior to joining NDSU, Wu and Wang worked at Harvard University for more than 10 and eight years, respectively. Wu was a faculty member at Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard University, and Wang was a research associate at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University.

NDSU Faculty Present and Publish Communication Research | 2/8/2011

February 8, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Elizabeth Crisp Crawford, assistant professor of communication at North Dakota State University, co-wrote the article, "Social Identity and Convergence: News Faculty and Student Perspectives on Web, Print, and Broadcast Skills," with Glenn Hubbard, assistant professor of communication at East Carolina University, Greenville, and Vincent Filak, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. Electronic News, an American educational journalism and mass communication journal, accepted the article for publication in March.

Crawford also had a competitive paper accepted for the Broadcast Education Association's national conference in Las Vegas. The paper titled, "Who's really converging, anyway? A survey of broadcast and print journalism student and faculty attitudes on cross-platform journalism and university education," focuses on the group psychology of convergence and the necessity of converged media education in the new media age. The paper also was co-written with Hubbard.

NDSU Professor Publishes Article on Trans-Atlantic Collaboration | 2/7/2011

February 7, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Bruce Maylath, professor of English, published an article in the December 2010 issue of IEEE-Transactions in Professional Communication with co-authors John Humbley of France's University of Paris-Denis Diderot, Birthe Mousten of Denmark's Aarhus University, and Sonia Vandepitte of Belgium's University College Ghent. The article, "Learning Localization through Trans-Atlantic Collaboration: Bridging the Gap between Professions," examines what has been learned during the preceding decade in matching technical writing students in the U.S. (including NDSU) with translation students in Europe in collaborative assignments.

Interdisciplinary Artist Names James Rosenquist Artist in Residence at North Dakota State University | 2/7/2011

February 7, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– The Department of Visual Arts at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has announced that James Sham, Houston, Texas, has been named the 2011 James Rosenquist Artist in Residence at NDSU.  Mr. Sham will work spring semester 2011 in the studio dedicated for the program at NDSU’s Visual Arts Department, interacting with students, holding public lectures, and opening his studio to visitors.

The focus of Mr. Sham’s work is to create interactions within the public sphere.  He is interested in producing and/or setting the stage for specific interpersonal actions, which often lead into mistranslations and unanticipated meanings.  This relationship is captured as video, performance, installation, photography, or sculpture.   At NDSU, Mr. Sham will teach a seminar course and his residency will culminate with an exhibition and donation of a piece of artwork to the James Rosenquist Artist Residency Collection.  Additional information about Mr. Sham can be found online at www.jamessham.com.

Mr. Sham holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.F.A. from Virginia Commonwealth University.  He has taught at Rice University, Houston, Texas, and is a visiting critic at the University of Houston.  His work has been exhibited at the Asian Arts Initiative, Philadelphia, Penn.; Kim Foster Gallery, New York, N.Y.; Kunstprojects, Berlin, Germany; Appetite Gallery, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, Wash., among others.  In addition to the James Rosenquist Residency award, Mr. Sham has been awarded graduate fellowship awards, the Wolfenden Fine Arts Award, Dartmouth College; and a Phi Kappa Phi Scholarship, Virginia Commonwealth University.

The James Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program for Visual Arts at NDSU honors James Rosenquist.  Born in Grand Forks, N.D., Rosenquist is considered one of the greatest living artists of the Pop Art movement of North America. His work and career are internationally known.  He was awarded an honorary doctorate from NDSU in May 2005.

NDSU introduced the James Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program in 2006 with its inaugural artist, Hedi Schwobel, of Ludwigsburg, Germany.  One of her artistic installations included sculpted salt blocks placed in pastures with cattle near Casselton and Leonard, N.D.  The second artist in residence, sculptor Jonathan Pellitteri, used his experience as a mason and carpenter to create artwork that included various mediums and processes representing his observations of the world around him.  The 2009 artist in residence, Min Kim Park, explored issues revolving around gender, ethnicity and identity using multimedia performances.  Last year’s artist, Michael Namkung, used video to capture kinesthetic drawing experiments that use the physicality of one’s body as the medium.

Artists participating in the residency program often integrate NDSU students and community members into the artistic process while in Fargo.

“The thriving Rosenquist Artist in Residency Program has brought international artists to campus over the past three years, providing additional learning options for NDSU students, as well as high school students, alongside activities with the regional arts community,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer, which funds the program.

National Magazine Features NDSU Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department | 2/3/2011

February 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –Products Finishing magazine highlights the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials (CPM) at NDSU in a recent article titled “Schools of Thought: More colleges offering programs in coatings; Coating companies using college labs for research.”

The article notes the CPM’s successful track record conducting coatings research for industry and government, as well as research opportunities available for NDSU students. “The demand for coating and polymer expertise exceeds the supply,” says Dr. Victoria Johnston Gelling, an assistant professor in the NDSU department, who is quoted in the article. “Our graduates are especially sought after by the coatings and chemical industries.”

Graduate students from the U.S., Asia, Europe, South and Central Americas are involved in the program. Graduates of the department work in a variety of settings, from paint companies to industry to cosmetics.

Internationally known for its excellent educational and research programs, the NDSU Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials has developed close partnerships with industry and government agencies. The magazine article notes that the NDSU Department maintains an industry advisory panel that includes 3M, Valspar, Cytec, Rohm and Haas, Toyota, Akzo, Bayer, BASF, Sherwin-Williams, PPG, Phoenix, Tecton, Air Products, Boeing and the U.S. Air Force, along with others.

The NDSU Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department includes eight professors, five postdoctoral researchers and 30 graduate students, in addition to undergraduate students. The Department includes the North Dakota Economic Development Center of Excellence for Surface Protection, a program initiated by former Governor, now U.S. Sen. John Hoeven, and the North Dakota Legislature. The Center provides companies an opportunity to partner with NDSU in coatings research and testing.

In the Products Finishing article, CPM Department Chair Stuart Croll points out the prevalence of coatings on materials used every day. “Coating science remains a fertile and interesting field because many modern inventions require protection, appearance or a special function provided by coatings.”

http://www.pfonline.com/articles/schools-of-thought-more-colleges-offering-programs-in-coatings

NDSU Researchers Release Cloud Computing Simulator | 2/3/2011

February 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Samee U. Khan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NDSU, and colleagues P. Bouvry and D. Kliazovich from the University of Luxembourg have released under the General Public License Agreement a sophisticated cloud computing simulator called GreenCloud.

According to Khan, the lack of detailed simulators on the market was the motivation to develop GreenCloud that allows researchers to observe, interact and measure cloud performance. There also was no provisioning for observing clouds for their energy-efficiency.

GreenCloud is an extension of the well-known NS2 network simulator. It is focused primarily on the communications within a cloud, i.e., all of the communication processes are simulated on packet level. About 80 percent of GreenCloud code is implemented in C++ while the remaining 20 percent is in the form of Tool Command Language scripts.

The Secrets of Seashells | 2/3/2011

February 3, 2011, Fargo, N.D. –– Mimicking nature could lead to new technologies, according to North Dakota State University Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering Kalpana Katti. She is quoted in the recent article “Seashells so tough they’ll kick sand in your face,” featured on MSNBC at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41378069/ns/technology_and_science-science/ and in LiveScience with the article “Seashells get their strength from interlocking bricks” at http://www.livescience.com/animals/where-sea-shells-get-their-strength-110201.html

“The seashells took some very humble materials, chalk and proteins, and made something a lot tougher,” said Katti in the article, which highlights other recent research done at Purdue University and published online in Nature Communications. Abalone seashells consist of an outer layer along with a tough inner layer called nacre (nay’ kur), more commonly known as mother-of-pearl. In the Live Science article, Katti notes that additional research is needed to understand nacre and its properties. “The organic in nacre is a cocktail of 30 proteins, and we don't know the structure of even one,” she told LiveScience. “The mechanics of nacre is very complex.”

While the dual life of mother-of-pearl encompasses beauty and strength, scientists aren’t interested in making seashells. “We want to use other materials and understand how seashells are made. Just like nature has taken calcium carbonate and made it 3,000 times tougher, we can take other composites and make them thousands of times tougher,” explains Katti. “It could make possible lightweight armored aircraft, body armor, artificial body parts, and protective coatings that are strong and flexible.” She points out that their research has shown that nacre’s interlocking bricks, platelet rotation and properties of organics are critical. “If we can play with those, we can engineer materials that are much better than what we have now.”

In addition, research done in the Katti and Katti group at NDSU has shown that mineral proximity plays a profound role on mechanics of proteins. This was observed through steered molecular simulations on mechanics of nacre proteins in proximity of calcium carbonate minerals in nacre. This fact was also observed by the group for synthetic polymers in close proximity of nanoclays and nanohydroxyapatite, and also observed for human bone. The conclusion is that organics in nanoscale proximity with charged mineral surfaces exhibit mechanical behavior far superior to their innate insitu behavior. Biology, such as in seashells and bone, often presents good examples of nanoscale proximity of organics with minerals.

Dr. Kalpana Katti and Dr. Dinesh Katti, professor of civil engineering at NDSU, have published more than 25 scientific articles regarding research on nacre. Interlocking bricks found in nacre’s structure were first discovered by the Katti research group at NDSU, with research results published in the Journal of Material Research, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 2005. More recent research results have been published in the Journal of Nanomaterials, Journal of Materials Science, Journal of Nanoscience, Journal of Nanotechnology, and the Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

About NDSU
With a reputation for excellence in teaching and multidisciplinary research, North Dakota State University, Fargo, links academics to opportunities. As a metropolitan land grant institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities without a medical school in the U.S., based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects. www.ndsu.edu

NDSU Prof Khan Appointed Associate Editor | 1/31/2011

January 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Samee U. Khan, assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering at NDSU, has been appointed associate editor of Cluster Computing. The journal presents the latest research in parallel processing, distributed computing, autonomic computing, grid computing, utility computing, cloud computing and computer communication networks. Cluster Computing is in its 14th year of existence and is published by Springer.

Wu Lab at NDSU to Publish a Paper in Cancer Letters | 1/31/2011

January 31, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, and Kruttika Bhat, doctoral student in the cellular and molecular program and pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "Stem cell factor/c-kit signaling enhances invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via HIF-1alpha under normoxic condition," which will be published by Cancer Letters.

According to the authors, the stem cell factor/c-kit signaling plays an important role in invasion of c-kit-expressing tumor cells; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been studied yet. Using a pancreatic cancer model, they demonstrate that stem cell factor/c-kit binding up-regulates the expression of invasion-related genes through the accumulation of HIF-1alpha. Furthermore, the expression of HIF-1alpha induced by stem cell factor is not dependent on the oxygen level, but rather on both the PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, under normoxic conditions, stem cell factor/c-kit binding increases expression of HIF-1α through the PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/ERK pathways, and the accumulation of HIF-1alpha up-regulates expression of invasion-related genes that augment the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer.

"In this study, we present SCF/c-kit enhances the pancreatic cancer invasion via HIF-1alpha. Pancreatic cancer is a fatal cancer; therefore, our results suggest that the inhibition of both c-kit and HIF-1alpha may be an effective strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy," Wu said. Wu lab research interests include tumor therapeutic targets, drug discovery and biomarkers. Wu's lab has a close collaboration with Qingyong Ma's lab at Xi'an Jiaotong University, China.

Cancer Letters is an international journal providing a forum for original and pertinent contributions in cancer research.

NDSU Professor Publishes Article on Factors that Affect Learning | 1/28/2011

January 28, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Amy Rupiper Taggart, NDSU associate professor of English and director of first-year writing, published an article in the International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning titled "What's Stalling Learning? Using a Formative Assessment Tool to Address Critical Incidents in Class." She conducted the research and collaborated on the article with H. Brooke Hessler, professor of English at Oklahoma City University.

The article reports on the use of Stephen Brookfield's formative assessment tool, the "Critical Incident Questionnaire" (CIQ), to help students and teachers identify and discuss key factors affecting learning. Rupiper Taggart and Hessler offer insight into two major areas: testing and adapting the existing tool to improve teaching and learning and identifying moments of potentially productive tension between the learner and the learning process. Their research questions were "Based on insights emerging from regular use of the CIQ, how might the tool be better worded to encourage productive student reflection?" and "What common stasis points do students identify when they reflect on their learning in the weekly CIQ?"

The research was conducted within the context of a longitudinal, cross-institutional study of reflective practices in writing courses. Responses indicated a tendency to report challenges related to the pedagogical approaches of the class more than challenges concerning the understanding of course content. The study yields insights into the use of the CIQ itself and into the kinds of "critical incidents" students considered most noteworthy. The fifth anniversary issue of International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning is available online at academics.georgiasouthern.edu/ijsotl/v5n1.html.

NDSU Prof Rasmussen Featured as Expert on Materials Website | 1/26/2011

January 26, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — Materials website, The A to Z of Materials (www.azom.com), invited Seth Rasmussen, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, to join their "Materials Thought Leaders" series as an expert in the field of organic materials chemistry.

The series includes articles that cover the key technology areas where materials are making an impact and where they will make an increasing impact. Experts who have been invited as recognized leaders in their fields write the articles.

 
Rasmussen's research focuses on design and synthesis of organic semiconducting materials for applications in solar cells and light emitting diodes. His work will be highlighted on the website through both a career profile and a feature article titled "Designing Organic Semiconducting Materials: The Promise of Flexible Electronics."

NDSU Professor Dean Webster To Receive Roy W. Tess Award In Coatings From American Chemical Society | 1/25/2011

January 25, 2011, Fargo, N.D.—Dr. Dean C. Webster of North Dakota State University (NDSU) Coatings and Polymeric Materials (CPM) Department will receive the prestigious Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2011 from the American Chemical Society (ACS). The Officers and Award Committee of the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) of the ACS made the award announcement.

Dr. Webster will receive the Tess Award from Dr. Todd Emrick, Chair of the PMSE Division, on Aug. 29, 2011, during the 242nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver, Colo. Dr. Webster will present an Award Address at that time. The purpose of the award is to encourage interest and progress in coatings science technology and engineering and to recognize significant contributions to the field. The Award consists of a plaque and a $3000 cash prize. Dr. Webster noted that three others once affiliated with NDSU are past recipients of the Tess Award including CPM department chairs Zeno W. Wicks, Jr. in 1988 and Frank N. Jones in 2001; and J. Edward Glass in 2005.

Dr. Webster joined the Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department of NDSU as a professor in 2001. His research includes developing green technology coatings that use biobased materials, polymers that use nanoparticles, coatings for flexible microelectronics, and non-toxic coatings for use on Navy ships. At NDSU, Dr. Webster’s specific areas of focus are:

  • Synthesis of new high performance polymers and thermosets.
  • Synthesis of novel polymer structures.
  • Use of biobased raw materials in high performance coatings systems.
  • The use of Combinatorial and High Throughput methods applied to Materials Science to explore and screen a wide variety of polymer and coating compositions in a short period of time.
  • Non-toxic fouling release coatings for Navy vessels.
  • Radiation curable polymers for printable conductors for flexible microelectronics.
  • Incorporation of nanoparticles into polymers.

Dr. Webster has authored more than 75 peer-reviewed papers and publications and is credited with 11 patents (an additional 18 pending) on coatings related topics. He is a past chair of the Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society. He serves on the Professional Development Committee of the American Coatings Association (ACA), and was recently named an Editor for the journal, Progress in Organic Coatings. Previously, Dr. Webster won Roon Foundation Awards for the best paper in the 2003, 2004 and 2006 International Coatings Exposition (ICE) of the American Coatings Association. He was the invited keynote Technical Focus Speaker at the 2004 International Coatings Exposition.

Dr. Webster’s career in the coatings industry began in 1984 in corporate R&D, followed by research for the Consumer Division of Sherwin-Williams in Chicago, Ill., where he was involved in resin development for industrial coatings, as well as long-range research in new resins and crosslinking chemistry. In 1993, he moved to Eastman Chemical Company where he led project teams in the areas of application development for new monomers, new chemistry for coatings systems, and polymer development for coatings.

Dr. Webster received his Ph.D. in materials engineering science at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1984. Prior to that, he received his B.S. degree in chemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Upcoming Science Café Addresses Biorefineries | 1/24/2011

January 24, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The next Science Café is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. in Stokers Basement in the Hotel Donaldson, in downtown Fargo, 101 N. Broadway.

Mukund P. Sibi, distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will present "Better Living Through Plants. Are Biorefineries the Next Panacea?"

Fossil fuels are currently the primary source of energy and chemicals. Debate continues on the sustainability of fossil fuels as an energy source for the future and its negative impact on global climate. Thus there is an urgency to identify eco-friendly alternatives to fossil fuels. Biomass has been hailed as a potential renewable resource alternative to fossil fuels. Sibi will discuss the pros and cons on the concept of biorefineries as a replacement for petroleum refineries to meet the growing needs of the 21st century.

For more information regarding upcoming Science Cafés, visit earth.physics.ndsu.nodak.edu

Innovation Week Scheduled for Jan. 24 to 28 | 1/24/2011

January 24, 2011, Fargo, N.D. — The second annual Innovation Week is scheduled for Jan. 24 to 28 at Richard H. Barry Hall. The event strives to cultivate and inspire entrepreneurship among students through presentations and interactive events. This year, Innovation Week will include seven breakout sessions, a keynote presentation, a reception with President Dean L. Bresciani and an expo featuring new technology. The breakout sessions are scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 25, and Thursday, Jan. 27, in Barry Hall conference rooms. Topics range from social media to angel investors.

"Innovation Week is a great opportunity for students to learn more about entrepreneurship," said Brenda Wyland, associate director for the NDSU Research & Technology Park. "The breakout sessions are one of the platforms used to educate students on a variety of topics related to new venture start-ups."

A reception with President Dean L. Bresciani will begin at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 25, in the Barry Hall Atrium. John Meyer and Scott Meyer of 9 Clouds will present the keynote presentation, "Entrepreneur: Y B 1," at 5:45 p.m. in the Barry Hall AgCountry Auditorium.

According to their website, 9 Clouds helps businesses understand and use online technology through education, speaking, consultancy, monitoring and engagement. Their presentation will showcase and teach the power and potential of online technology through humor, practical examples and brotherly banter.

The technology expo will be held in the Barry Hall Atrium Jan. 25–27 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibitors include: NDSU College of Engineering, Red River Valley Research Corridor, Ergologistics, IdeaOne, Aldevron, NDSU Tech Transfer, Avenue Right and OnSharp.

Innovation Week is co-sponsored by the NDSU Research & Technology Park, NDSU Technology Incubator and the College of Business to increase awareness of entrepreneurship, encourage students to consider entrepreneurship as a career, educate students on resources available for entrepreneurs and connect students with current entrepreneurs and business communities. All students and faculty are encouraged to participate in this free event.

For more information and details, visit www.ndsuresearchpark.com/about/Pages/events.aspx

NDSU's Khan Receives Best Paper Award | 1/19/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 19, 2011 — Samee U. Khan, NDSU assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering, received the best paper award at the inaugural International Conference on Green Computing and Communications (GreenCom) in Hangzhou, China, in December 2010. GreenCom was jointly sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He shares this award with his colleagues from the University of Luxembourg for the paper, "DENS: Data Center Energy-Efficient Network-Aware Scheduling."

Cook of NDSU Named to Editorial Board | 1/19/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 19, 2011 — Gregory Cook, NDSU professor and chair of chemistry and biochemistry, has been named to the editorial board of the journal, ISRN Organic Chemistry. The journal is part of the International Scholarly Research Network, a series of peer-reviewed, open access journals that are designed to provide a fast peer review process for all submitted manuscripts. ISRN Organic Chemistry is edited by a distributed editorial board covering all areas of organic chemistry and is published by Hindawi Publishing Corp.

NDSU’s Heuer Publishes and Presents Health-related Research | 1/14/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 14, 2011 — Loretta Heuer, associate dean and professor of nursing at NDSU, has co-written an article for Medical Care, the official journal of the medical care section, American Public Health Association. The article is titled "Positive and negative spillovers of the health disparities collaboratives in federally qualified health centers." Heuer also presented "North Dakota Partners in Nursing Gerontology Consortium Project" at a conference for the North Dakota Long-Term Care Association in Bismarck, N.D., in December.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Recent Research Activities | 1/11/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 11, 2011 — NDSU College of Human Development and Education faculty members are engaging in a variety of research activities, involving subjects ranging from food safety to youth sports, student supervisors, exercise science and science education.

Abby Gold, assistant professor and Extension specialist in health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, is presenting two sessions at the Urban Extension Conference in Des Moines, Iowa, this spring. One session is titled "Food Safety and New Americans: Developing Educational Materials for Impact," the other session, in conjunction with Shelley Sherman from the University of Minnesota Extension, is titled, "Simply Good Eating for English Language Learners: A Practitioner Evaluation."

Jared Tucker, assistant professor in health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, had a manuscript accepted for publication in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine. "Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: Compliance with the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans," uses nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to summarize physical activity levels among U.S. adults. It is the first article to report objectively measured physical activity levels in the U.S. according to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2008.

Jay Albrecht, assistant professor, and Brad Strand, professor, both of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, had two recent publications. The article, "A Brief History of Youth Sports," was published in the Journal of Youth Sports and "Basic First Aid Qualifications and Knowledge Among Youth Sport Coaches" was published in the Journal of Coaching Education. Albrecht and Strand previously presented a research poster at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance annual convention in Indianapolis titled "Youth Sport Coaches Qualifications and Knowledge of Basic First Aid." The papers and research poster all resulted from Albrecht's dissertation research.

Brent Young, assistant professor of Agricultural and Extension Education, co-presented a workshop titled "Capitalizing on Content: Evidence from NRCCTE Curriculum Integration Studies" at the Association for Career and Technical Education Annual Conference. Young highlighted the Science-in-CTE pilot study, a research project designed to parallel aspects of the successful Math-in-CTE curriculum integration model. Assistant professors Brent Young, Gary Ketterling and Mari Borr served as the State Project Director, State Science Specialist and Project Consultant, respectively. The project was conducted during spring semester 2010.

Jill Nelson, assistant professor in the School of Education, Clarrice Rapisarda (UNC-Charlotte) and Kimberly Desmond (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) have had an article accepted for publication in The Clinical Supervisor: An interdisciplinary journal of theory, research and practice. The article, "Student Reflections on the Journey to Being a Supervisor" is scheduled to appear in the Spring 2011 issue of the publication.

More Jobs and Increased Revenue:
Report Shows NDSU Research & Tech Park’s Economic Impact on Region | 1/5/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 5, 2011 — The NDSU Research & Technology Park (RTP) positively impacts economies, helps create jobs and helps generate revenue for local and state governments, according to a new report by an independent economic impact firm. Most notable, the total number of jobs in the Park jumped more than 74 percent over the past five years. By 2011, out-of-state revenues flowing to businesses in the Park are expected to have grown 74 percent, and international revenues will likewise have grown 77 percent.

“Research universities are uniquely positioned to foster and create a more diversified economy, and the unprecedented success of NDSU’s research park in the few years of its existence serves to illuminate that point,” said President Dean L. Bresciani.

The Idaho firm, Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc., (EMSI), examined a range of economic indicators to analyze the NDSU Research & Technology Park’s performance from 2007 to 2010, with projections for 2011.

Highlights of NDSU Research Park economic impact report:

  • The 19 businesses located at the NDSU Research & Technology Park account for 893 direct, on-site jobs, and an additional 551 indirect, off-site jobs.
  • Out-of-state sources pay for an estimated two-thirds of all jobs, earnings and local tax revenues generated by NDSU’s Research & Technology Park.
  • The total number of jobs in the Park increased more than 74 percent from 2006 to 2010, from 511 to 893.
  • Industries in NDSU’s Research Park pay out $50.9 million in wages annually and account for another $22.7 million in indirect off-site wages, due to multiplier effects, for a total of $73.6 million in labor income in North Dakota.
  • The NDSU Research Park generates an estimated $10.9 million per year for state and local governments, which includes $7.3 million in state government revenues through sales taxes, personal and corporate state income taxes and other charges, both directly and indirectly.
  • The Park generates an estimated $3.6 million annually for local governments through property taxes, other taxes and fees, both directly and indirectly.
  • Approximately 65 percent to 70 percent of the NDSU Research Park’s annual revenues originate from outside of North Dakota.
  • By 2011, out-of-state revenues flowing to businesses in the Park are expected to have grown 74 percent, while international revenues will have jumped 77 percent.
  • Total revenues flowing into the Park increased 51.8 percent from 2007 to 2010, from $95.8 million to $145.5 million. For 2011, projected revenues flowing into businesses in the Park are $172.8 million.
  • The report estimates that Research Park industries and off-site, linked businesses generate $28.4 million in direct or indirect property income in North Dakota. This measure includes retained earnings, dividend, interest and bond payments and depreciation allowances.
  • Companies in the NDSU Park conduct trade with 26 nations on six continents, contributing approximately 10 percent of the Park’s revenue.
  • Clients in the NDSU Technology Incubator received approximately $3.9 million in private and other grants, venture capital and angel investment funds in 2008. In 2011, such funding is projected to be $16.1 million.
  • Businesses in the Research Park pay an average salary of $57,000, up from $51,000 in 2005.
  • Four of 19 companies in the Research Park earn royalty and licensing revenues from patents and discoveries and for every $1 of costs incurred, companies earn $2.80 in present value terms.
  • On-site employment in the Park includes 138 jobs for NDSU students and 286 jobs for NDSU graduates, for an estimated 32 percent of Park jobs held by NDSU graduates and 15 percent held by NDSU students.

The report also provided an opportunity for NDSU graduate student James Dravitz of East Grand Forks, Minn., who led the data collection and coordinated the study. “The opportunity helped apply my critical thinking and communications skills as a master’s student in business administration at NDSU,” said Dravitz, who worked with tenants in the Park on the project. “It has been a great learning experience.”

Companies participating in the study included Bolder Thinking, located in NDSU’s Technology Incubator. “Launching a business is always challenging and is based on having a really good idea, a solid business model, and a great team,” said John Jasper, founder of Bolder Thinking. “The NDSU Research & Technology Park is a great platform on which to connect with the talent coming out of NDSU. As we grow our Cloud Telephony business, Bolder Thinking will continue to expand our technology development and business operations within North Dakota,” said Jasper.

Combining Park opportunities with NDSU’s areas of research expertise has been a key to achieving these results. “Companies have located in the Park for a variety of reasons, including access to NDSU student and faculty researchers in areas such as coatings, microelectronics and engineering.” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer at NDSU. “Companies here also have an interest in licensing the technologies developed at NDSU.”

The report’s summary noted: “The overall picture indicated by EMSI’s look at the RTP is one of strong economic performance, significant job and income-creating effects, and a substantial contributor to North Dakota’s tax base, both state and local. Future growth at the Park will contribute not only to the Fargo economy, but elsewhere in the state through economic multiplier effects.”

The NDSU Research & Technology Park commissioned the study at a cost of $8,500 to track economic impact and progress of the Park. NDSU’s Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics conducted a less comprehensive economic impact study in 2006.

The latest economic impact report is available at www.ndsuresearchpark.com/ABOUT/Pages/events.aspx

A list of businesses in NDSU’s Research & Technology Park is available at www.ndsuresearchpark.com/Tenants/Pages/default.aspx

About NDSU’s Research & Technology Park
The NDSU Research & Technology Park operates to enhance the investments in North Dakota State University by the citizens of North Dakota. Through partnerships with international, national and regional centers of excellence, high technology-based businesses, and the research community at NDSU, the Research & Technology Park works to achieve successful technology-based development and broaden the economic base of North Dakota. Located on 55 acres at the northwest edge of the NDSU campus, and five minutes from Hector International Airport, the Park serves as a business incubator and commercialization contributor to the local and regional economy, and provides technology opportunities to students and graduates.

About Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc.
Economic Modeling Specialists Inc. (EMSI) based in Moscow, Idaho, provides high-quality employment data and economic analysis via web tools and custom reports. The company produces comprehensive impact analyses for colleges and universities in the U.S. and internationally.

NDSU Scientists Featured on PBS Nova Show | 1/4/2011

Fargo, N.D., January 4, 2011 — Allan Ashworth, distinguished professor of geosciences at North Dakota State University, and Dr. Adam Lewis of NDSU are featured in the December 28, PBS NOVA show. “Secrets Beneath the Ice,” features video and interviews with the NDSU geologists about their fossil discoveries in Antarctica. The video originally appeared in the film “Ice People” by Anne Aghion who, along with her team, spent weeks filming Ashworth and Lewis, along with NDSU students who accompanied them, as they conducted field work in Antarctica. See the program at www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/secrets-beneath-ice.html

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