Press Room

Research News Releases—2012
 

NDSU Awarded Funds to Analyze Sugar Beets for Biofuel l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics is part of a grant to develop enhanced energy sugar beets that are optimized for biofuel production. The grant is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Other partners in the $1.8 million, three-year program are Plant Sensory Systems LLC in Baltimore and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Plant Sensory LLC and the USDA will engineer beets to use fertilizer and water more efficiently and produce higher levels of fermentable sugars, compared with current feedstocks. The energy beets will have lower production costs and increased yield for biofuels without competing against food-grade sugar. 

“The NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics will lead the project’s economic and environmental analyses,” said David Ripplinger, bioproducts and bioenergy economist and assistant professor in the department. “The award recognizes NDSU’s expertise in economic and life-cycle analyses and provides support to build on this expertise during the three-year project.” 

The grant recognizes the promise of energy beets as an industrial feedstock and a proprietary yield-enhancing technology to improve the competitiveness of energy beets as a feedstock. 

“This is good news for the development of the industrial sugar industry in North America, especially in the northern Plains, where there are advantages to growing energy beets, so there are ongoing efforts to introduce energy beets as an industrial crop, as well as the construction and operation of processing facilities and biorefineries,” Ripplinger says. “ARPA-e funding is extremely competitive, so the projects it selects become very high profile.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Center Co-Director Presents in Brazil l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kimberly Vonnahme, NDSU associate professor of animal sciences and co-director of the Center for Nutrition and Pregnancy, was an invited speaker at the International Symposium on Animal Biology and Reproduction, which was held Oct. 17-20 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Her presentation was titled “How the Maternal Environment Impacts Fetal and Placental Development: Implications for Livestock.” 

The event focused on environment and reproduction and was sponsored by the Brazilian College of Animal Reproduction. Presenters were from Brazil, Denmark, Belgium, Argentina, Chile, Canada and the United States. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Associate English Professor Researches American Novelist l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Gary Totten, associate professor of English, has published two articles on the American novelist, Edith Wharton. His essay, “ ‘Inhospitable Splendour’: Spectacles of Consumer Culture and Race in Wharton’s Summer,” was published in the journal, Twentieth Century Literature.

In the article, Totten examines the connections between Wharton’s depiction of the novel’s female protagonist, early-20th century consumer practices, and attitudes toward race and gender. In his book chapter, “Selling Wharton” in Edith Wharton in Context, Totten examines Wharton’s relationship to book publishing and marketing throughout her career. 

Totten also presented a paper at the Western Literature Association Conference in Lubbock, Texas, Nov. 7-10. In his paper, “Remembering Alta California in Frank Norris’s McTeague,” he discussed the novel’s depiction of a Mexican-American character and what it reveals about late-19th century racial beliefs in the United States. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Business Faculty to Publish Articles l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D.NDSU accounting faculty members Tom Dowdell, associate professor, and Bonnie Klamm, professor, had their manuscript, “Internal Control Reporting and Market Liquidity,” accepted for publication in Research in Accounting Regulation.

Ruilin Tian, assistant professor of finance, co-wrote the manuscript, “Managing Capital Markets and Longevity Risks in a Defined Benefit Pension Plan,” which has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Risk and Insurance. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Associate English Professor Researches American Novelist l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Gary Totten, associate professor of English, has published two articles on the American novelist, Edith Wharton. His essay, “ ‘Inhospitable Splendour’: Spectacles of Consumer Culture and Race in Wharton’s Summer,” was published in the journal, Twentieth Century Literature.

In the article, Totten examines the connections between Wharton’s depiction of the novel’s female protagonist, early-20th century consumer practices, and attitudes toward race and gender. In his book chapter, “Selling Wharton” in Edith Wharton in Context, Totten examines Wharton’s relationship to book publishing and marketing throughout her career. 

Totten also presented a paper at the Western Literature Association Conference in Lubbock, Texas, Nov. 7-10. In his paper, “Remembering Alta California in Frank Norris’s McTeague,” he discussed the novel’s depiction of a Mexican-American character and what it reveals about late-19th century racial beliefs in the United States. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU English Professor, Graduate Students Present Panel l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Bruce Maylath, NDSU professor of English, and English doctoral students Steven Hammer and Karen Sorensen presented the panel, “Infusing International Collaborations Throughout Technical Communication Programs,” at the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication conference held Sept. 27-29 in Houghton, Mich. Their presentations discussed aspects of growing, collaborating in diverse disciplines and editing translations in the Trans-Atlantic Project.

Founded in 1974, the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication brings together directors and administrators from across the United States and increasingly from other countries.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


North Dakota EPSCoR Announces New Faculty Start-up Awards l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Five NDSU departments received New Faculty Start-Up awards funded through North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. A total of $370,000 over two years will be provided in supplemental New Faculty Start-Up funds to new hires in the biological sciences, chemistry and biochemistry, civil engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and mathematics departments.

The New Faculty Start-Up program’s major goal is to staff North Dakota’s research-intensive universities with new faculty who will be nationally competitive for grants from federal agency research programs in science, engineering and mathematics.

“These funds give chairs of departments the means to provide start-up packages that allow new faculty to equip and staff their laboratories,” said Philip Boudjouk, co-chair of North Dakota EPSCoR and NDSU vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer.

ND EPSCoR is a federally and state-funded program designed to help university researchers compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in the sciences, engineering and mathematics. For more information, visit www.ndepscor.nodak.edu


NDSU Psychology Faculty Member Reviews National Patient Grant Proposals l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kevin McCaul, psychology professor and senior adviser at NDSU, was invited to be part of the first full review of proposals submitted to the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The independent, non-profit organization was authorized as the “research wing” of the Affordable Care Act. Its mission is to fund research that will provide patients and clinicians with evidence-based information that will lead to well-informed health care decisions.

McCaul traveled to Washington, D.C., in November for phase II and final review of proposals submitted to the Communication and Dissemination Research Panel. The panel was charged with focusing on the impact of the grant proposals, which already had been reviewed for scientific merit. 

“It was an interesting contrast to my prior reviewing experience, because we were asked to judge the likelihood that the results of the research would be disseminated and incorporated into practice quickly or at least within a short period of time, three to five years,” McCaul said. 

Each proposal was reviewed by a group of two scientists, a patient representative and a stakeholder. McCaul’s review group expected to recommend 14 awards for a total of $12 million in available funds. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU HD&E Faculty Present, Publish and Receive Awards l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several College of Human Development and Education faculty members at NDSU recently gave presentations, published research and received awards. 

Wendi Stachler, adjunct instructor in the School of Education, presented one of two papers named as the Research Conference Distinguished Manuscript at the 2012 North Central Conference of the American Association of Agricultural Education held in Champaign, Ill. The paper, titled “Sustainability of Professional Development to Enhance Student Achievement: A Shift in the Professional Development Paradigm,” was co-written with Stachler’s adviser, Brent Young, associate professor, and graduate committee member, Mari Borr, assistant professor, both School of Education.

The purpose of the study was to determine the sustainability of professional development and teacher utilization of the Science-in-Career and Technical Education (CTE) pedagogical model and science-enhanced lessons in curricula one year following the Science-in-CTE Pilot Study.

Anita Welch, assistant professor, School of Education, presented a paper, titled “A Psychometric Re-evaluation of the Epistemic Beliefs Inventory,” at the International Conference on Education and Educational Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey. Chris Ray, assistant professor, School of Education, was co-author.

Sharon Query, assistant professor of practice, human development and family sciences and Center for 4-H; Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor, nursing; and Brandy Randall, associate professor, human development and family science, were awarded a $49,780 grant from the North Dakota Department of Transportation for “Increasing Seat Belt Usage among Pre-Driving Youth in North Dakota.” Query also was awarded a grant for $29,995 from the North Dakota Department of Transportation, “Parents LEAD.”

Query presented a poster session, titled “Boundaries,” with Dena Kemmet, Mercer County Extension Agent, at the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents National Meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Claudette Peterson, Anita Welch and Chris Ray, all assistant professors in the School of Education, and Mustafa Cakir, a colleague in Turkey, presented a paper, titled “Cross-Cultural Use of Surveys and Instruments in International Research: Lessons Learned from a Study in Turkey and the United States,” at the conference of the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education in Las Vegas in November. 

Peterson, Ray and doctoral student Dina Zavala-Petherbridge, also presented the results of a study, titled “Perceptions of Adult Education Faculty Concerning Advising Graduate Students,” at the conference of the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education Conference, Commission of Professors of Adult Education in Las Vegas in November. 

Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, presented a poster at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) in Philadelphia in October. The abstract was co-written and the poster was designed with Amelia Asperin, assistant professor of apparel, design and hospitality management, and Ann Ragan, lecturer of apparel, design and hospitality management. The submitted abstract was titled "Changing a Campus Classroom Into a Restaurant” and was published in the Academy's September 2012 journal.

The NDSU Couples and Family Therapy program was awarded the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Training Award at its annual conference in Charlotte, N.C. This award honors one association member or training program for significant contributions to advancement of the field of marriage and family therapy by encouraging and training the next generation of couple and family therapy researchers and/or practitioners.

Sarah McDougall, second-year graduate student, human development and family science, also was one of only two students in the U.S. and Canada to receive the Minority Scholarship at the conference. The Minority Scholarship supports recruitment and retention of minority students in the field and is given to students who demonstrate particular promise as future scholars.

Tia Fuhrmann, a second-year student in the Master of Athletic Training program, was selected by the North Dakota Athletic Trainer’s Association as the student representative for the 2013 iLEAD Conference in Dallas in January. The conference is sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association to promote leadership among young professionals in athletic training.  

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


Research Geneticist Elected Foreign Fellow of National Academy of Sciences, India l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Prem P. Jauhar, research geneticist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service, Northern Crop Science Laboratory and plant sciences adjunct professor at NDSU, has been elected as a Foreign Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences of India for 2012.

Jauhar also was elected Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America in 1995, the American Society of Agronomy in 1996 and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2003. 

Additionally, Jauhar’s diverse research has been published in a variety of journals, including Nature (London), Chromosoma, Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Genome, Plant Breeding, Genetica, Hereditas, the Journal of Heredity and Crop Science. Since 1990, he has served as the associate editor of the Journal of Heredity, an international journal of genetics. 


NDSU Animal Sciences Faculty Publish Results of Study l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several NDSU animal sciences faculty at NDSU recently published an article in Domestic Animal Endocrinology. Anna Grazul-Bilska, professor; Larry Reynolds, University Distinguished Professor; Dale Redmer, professor; Joel Caton, professor; and Kim Vonnahme, associate professor, published “Overfeeding and Underfeeding have Detrimental Effects on Oocyte Quality Measured by In Vitro Fertilization and Early Embryonic Development in Sheep” in Domestic Animal Endocrinology.

The article can be found at www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0739724012000598.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Associate Professor to Publish Two Papers l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A faculty member in NDSU's College of Business recently had two papers accepted for publication. Fred Riggins, associate professor of management information systems, had his co-written paper, “Identifying Business Value Using the RFID e-Valuation Framework,” accepted for publication in International Journal for RF Technologies: Research and Applications.

He also had his co-written manuscript, “Planning and Sprinting: The Use of a Hybrid Project Management Methodology in a CIS Capstone Course,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Information Systems Education. He co-wrote the manuscript with Aaron Baird, assistant professor of health administration at Georgia State University. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Assistant Professor Presents at European Studies Conference l 12/18/2012

December 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kristi Groberg, assistant professor of art history at NDSU, attended the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies annual conference, Nov. 14-19, in New Orleans. She presented her paper, titled “Theofanis Stavrou’s 50 Years of Service to Eastern Orthodox Studies,” during a roundtable honoring Stavrou’s career as an active educator, researcher, author and mentor in various aspects of Slavic studies.

Groberg’s paper will be printed in the publication, “Festschrift in Honor of Theofanis G. Stavrou,” which was edited by Groberg and Soterios Stavrou. The publication is comprised of scholarly articles contributed by Stavrou’s students, colleagues and friends from throughout the world, and librarians, translators, cartographers, photographers, poets and musicians.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


North Dakota State University and Lawrence Livermore National Lab Announce Research Partnership l 12/14/2012

December 14, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – North Dakota State University (NDSU), Fargo, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., announced that they have entered into a memorandum of agreement to collaborate on research and development projects involving computational-based modeling and simulation for energy and energy-related applications. NDSU President Dean Bresciani, and LLNL Director Dr. Penrose Albright finalized the agreement, which was announced by U.S. Senator John Hoeven at a signing ceremony at NDSU on Dec. 14.

Senator Hoeven said collaboration between the national lab and NDSU’s advanced computing capabilities through the NDSU Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST) is expected to lead to opportunities for NDSU students and faculty participating in the R&D partnership.

“Using high-performance computing, NDSU and LLNL will collaborate on research and development projects aimed at boosting energy production from shale formations like the Bakken,” said Hoeven.

“The energy challenges of today and tomorrow require new kinds of partnerships to develop and use new kinds of technology,” said LLNL Director Dr. Penrose (Parney) Albright. “We look forward to a close partnership with NDSU faculty, staff and students bringing advanced supercomputing to real world problems in fossil energy and sustainability.”

“Collaboration between NDSU and LLNL is expected to include faculty, staff and students on research projects, once funding is secured,” said NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani. “This will provide a tremendous opportunity for students to gain experience in the use of advanced supercomputers for science and technology development.”

Potential research may include enhancing productivity for tightly-bound liquid hydrocarbons, such as those found in the Bakken oil shale formation in North Dakota. Other potential research projects could include high-throughput chemical design and development of new, novel materials for energy applications.

“These collaborations provide additional opportunities for faculty and research teams at NDSU to use supercomputing capabilities for research with potential national impact in a variety of areas,” said NDSU Provost Bruce Rafert.

The research partners at NDSU and LLNL plan to develop and refine high performance computer-based simulators of reservoirs of tightly bound hydrocarbons such as oil and gas found in shale formations. In another collaboration, NDSU and LLNL plan to seek funding for projects to harness the power of advanced supercomputing to develop new materials and methodologies for robotic-driven rapid experimentation. NDSU has one of the largest laboratories for high-throughput, combinatorial chemistry for polymers, coatings and other materials. The proposed goal is to build new capabilities in computational chemistry and cheminformatics for commercial and industrial applications.

Upon securing funding, the research team plans to design and evaluate potential catalysts for commercial energy applications. Such research may include gas-to-liquid fuel catalysts, gas separations processes and energy conversion. Research may include design of new functional polymers and coatings for energy applications.

“High performance computing represents a critical shift in how research is conducted,” said Dr. Philip Boudjouk, vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer at NDSU.  “Nationally, there is expected to be an increasing need for interdisciplinary research teams, as well as for scientists who are algorithm and code developers, informatists and for programmers who are scientists. Researchers and students at NDSU will have the opportunity to develop and expand these skills through NDSU’s supercomputing facilities and through this research collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,” said Boudjouk.

Supercomputing facilities at NDSU provide opportunities and tools for faculty and students to conduct next generation research. “We assist researchers in energy, materials, environment, health, security, and in other areas of national research priority,” said Dr. Martin Ossowski, director of the Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provides solutions to our nation's most important national security challenges through innovative science, engineering and technology. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

About NDSU
North Dakota State University is a leader in both high throughput experimental applied chemistry and in coatings development.  Researchers at NDSU have created first-of-a-kind materials (e.g., liquid silica) and catalysts, polymers, and coatings used in defense applications and in commercial applications. The Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST) at NDSU, provides high-performance computing infrastructure for the university, its Research and Technology Park and their industrial partners, and engages in its own original research. NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” www.ndsu.edu/research


Want Your Baby to Learn? Research Shows Sitting Up Helps l 12/11/2012

December 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – From the Mozart effect to educational videos, many parents want to aid their infants in learning. New research out of North Dakota State University, Fargo, and Texas A&M shows that something as simple as the body position of babies while they learn plays a critical role in their cognitive development.

The study shows that for babies, sitting up, either by themselves or with assistance, plays a significant role in how infants learn. The research titled “Posture Support Improves Object Individuation in Infants,” co-authored by Rebecca J. Woods, assistant professor of human development and family science and doctoral psychology lecturer at North Dakota State University, and by psychology professor Teresa Wilcox of Texas A&M, is published in the journal Developmental Psychology®.

The study’s results show that babies’ ability to sit up unsupported has a profound effect on their ability to learn about objects. The research also shows that when babies who cannot sit up alone are given posture support from infant seats that help them sit up, they learn as well as babies who can already sit alone.

“An important part of human cognitive development is the ability to understand whether an object in view is the same or different from an object seen earlier,” said Dr. Woods. Through two experiments, she confirmed that 5-and-a-half- and 6-and-a-half-month-olds don’t use patterns to differentiate objects on their own. However, 6-and-a-half-month-olds can be primed to use patterns, if they have the opportunity to look at, touch and mouth the objects before being tested.

“An advantage the 6-and-a-half-month-olds may have is the ability to sit unsupported, which makes it easier for babies to reach for, grasp and manipulate objects. If babies don’t have to focus on balancing, their attention can be on exploring the object,” said Woods.

In a third experiment, 5-and-a-half-month-olds were given full postural support while they explored objects. When they had posture support, they were able to use patterns to differentiate objects. The research study also suggests that delayed sitting may cause babies to miss learning experiences that affect other areas of development.

“Helping a baby sit up in a secure, well-supported manner during learning sessions may help them in a wide variety of learning situations, not just during object-feature learning,” Woods said. “This knowledge can be advantageous, particularly to infants who have cognitive delays who truly need an optimal learning environment.”

The research was supported in part by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, under grants HD-36741 and HD-46532 awarded to Dr. Wilcox. Additional research funding was provided by National Institute of Health grant P20 RR016471 from the IdeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) program of the National Center for Research Resources awarded to Dr. Woods. NDSU undergraduate and graduate students assisted in data collection for the study.

Research at The Infant Cognitive Development Lab at NDSU focuses on cognitive abilities in infants that are related to attention and memory. The lab is associated with the Center for Visual and Cognitive Neuroscience at NDSU, which is devoted to increasing understanding of the ways that information is perceived and processed by the brain.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 research universities with very high research activity as named by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in psychology, social sciences, computer science, chemistry, physical sciences, and agricultural sciences, based on FY11 research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Methodology Research l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kelly Sassi, assistant professor in the NDSU English department and School of Education, had an article accepted for publication in Qualitative Inquiry. “ ‘If You Weren’t Researching Me and a Friend ...’: The Mobius of Friendship and Mentorship as Methodological Approaches to Qualitative Research” will appear in volume 18, issue 10 in December.

The article explores the affordances and risks of practicing friendship and mentorship as methodological approaches in two qualitative studies: the mentor’s study in a diverse ninth grade classroom and the protégé’s subsequent study of teacher professional development in the same school. By including mentorship as an extension of “friendship as method” for qualitative research, Sassi asserts mentorship as methodology socializes peers into the conventions of qualitative research.

Sassi’s research crosses disciplinary boundaries, studying social justice issues, pedagogy and writing assessment practices.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Assistant Professor Receives Funding for Nanofiber Research l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Xiangfa Wu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, has received a three-year, $218,325 award from the National Science Foundation to conduct research outlined in his proposal, titled “Multi-Physics Modeling and Experimental Characterization of Needleless Electrospinning for Scalable Nanofiber Production.”

The funding also provides research opportunities to graduate and undergraduate students to develop computer-aided electrospinning strategies for continuous, scalable production of ultrathin fibers or wires with the diameter in the range of a few nanometers to micrometers.

The research program in Wu’s group focuses on using electrospinning to produce nanofibers of a variety of materials such as synthetic and natural polymers, carbon, ceramics and metals, with well controlled size and morphology for advanced applications including high-strength self-healing polymer matrix composites, high-performance electrodes for use in supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries, ultrafine liquid and gas filters.

Electrospinning is a low-cost, top-down nanomanufacturing technique based on the principle of electrohydrodynamic jetting. Recently, the nanofiber productivity of electrospinning has been enhanced in orders by introducing the concept of free-surface electrohydrodynamic jetting or needleless electrospinning. Yet, controllable needleless electrospinning has not been explored fully.

Based on the funding from the National Science Foundation, Wu’s research group will study computer-aided electrospinning engineering for intelligent mass production of nanofibers with tailorable properties. One of the research goals is to gain a fundamental understanding of the entire process of needleless electrospinning, including jet initiation and elongation, drying, phase separation and nanopore formation by developing an efficient three-dimensional multi-physics phase-field model and related experimental validation.

According to Wu, students involved in the proposed investigations will learn advanced computational multi-physics modeling, design and optimization of electrospinning devices, controllable nanofiber manufacturing and characterization.

The research is funded by National Science Foundation award No. CMMI-1234297. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Sociology Associate Professor Publishes Articles l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Christina Weber, NDSU associate professor of sociology, published “Putting the Family into the Military Mission: A Feminist Exploration of a National Guard Family Program” in Cultural Studies Critical Methodologies. The methodological article focuses on her work on gender and the military.

The second article, “Navigating the Gender Math Path: Understanding Women’s Experiences in University Mathematics Classes, ” was published in International Review of Qualitative Research. Co-written with Angie Hodge, the article focuses on the challenges and successes of students in mathematics classes. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor of education at NDSU, had a research manuscript, titled “Stringing Rosaries: A Qualitative Study of Sixteen Northern Plains American Indian Boarding School Survivors,” published by the Journal of Multiculturalism in Education in its October issue.

Mari Borr, assistant professor of education at NDSU, and Virginia Clark Johnson, dean of human development and education, along with colleagues from Central Washington University, Texas Tech University, South Dakota State University and University of Nebraska-Lincoln, had a feature article accepted for publication in the fall 2012 issue of the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences. The article, “The Use of Messages and Media inan Inter-institutional, Online Approach to FCS Teacher Preparation,” describes the inter-institutional master’s degree program in family and consumer sciences education offered through the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance, as well as distance teaching techniques they have developed in teaching courses within the program.

Joe Deutsch, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, had a manuscript, “Making a Case for Having a Physical Education Specialist,” accepted for publication in Strategies.

Kara Gange, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, was involved in a study with Sanku Mallik, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, which was published in Molecular Pharmaceutics. The study was titled “Ultrasound Enhanced Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Triggered Release of Contents from Echogenic Liposomes.”

Jim Deal, professor and head of human development and family sciences, published “Implementing an Online Major” in The Department Chair; “Significant and Serious Hypohydration’s Effect on Muscle Cramp Threshold Frequency” in the British Journal of Sports Medicine; “The Hierarchical Structure of Childhood Personality in Five Countries: Continuity from Early Childhood to Early Adolescence” in Journal of Personality; and “Operationalizing Family Resilience as Process: Proposed Methodological Strategies” in Handbook of Family Resilience.

Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor of nursing, and Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science, have been awarded a three-year, $1,164,141 Personal Responsibility Education Program competitive grant through the Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families. The goal of the grant is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection prevention programming grounded in healthy youth development to vulnerable, high-risk youth in the greater Fargo-Moorhead area. The grant will be facilitated through a subcontract with Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, and Rory Beil of the Dakota Medical Foundation had an article, titled “Streets Alive! – A Community Initiative to Increase Family Physical Activity,” published in The Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Doctoral Student Receives Support for Forest Resource Research l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – An NDSU environmental and conservation sciences doctoral student has been selected to receive a high-tech instrument to help conduct forest resource research. Buddhika Madurapperuma has been selected to participate in the 2012 Alexander Goetz Instrument Support Program, which is awarded to fewer than 10 individuals per year and encourages novel, unconventional and/or fundamental research in the field of remote sensing and near-infrared spectroscopy.

“This is indeed a great honor for Buddhika in recognition of his groundbreaking research work he had conducted on forestry resource and management,” said Peter Oduor, associate professor of geology and geography.

Madurapperuma will receive a FieldSpec 4 spectroradiometer system, which will be used to acquire the spectral signatures of Russian olive and its associated plant communities such as cottonwood and silver buffaloberry. He will conduct a two-month field research at a wildland-urban interface and receive a $500 grant for publishing or presenting his research. Madurapperuma has conducted forest resource research with funding by the U.S. Forest Service and Cooperative Forestry Assistance grants with flow-through funding from North Dakota Forest Service.

The Alexander Goetz Instrument Support Program recognizes the longstanding contribution of Alexander Goetz in the field of remote sensing. He was a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, for 21 years. Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. sponsors the program.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Releases Beef Research Findings l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Livestock feed has been the focus of considerable research at NDSU in the past year. Field peas, hull-less barley and distillers grains are among the potential beef cattle feeds they've studied. The researchers concluded that:

  • Dried distillers grains plus solubles can be used to supplement growing steers fed medium-quality hay.
  • Feeding dried distillers grains plus solubles on alternate days may be an option when forage availability is limited. 
  • Field peas make an excellent feedstuff for finishing diets for feedlot cattle. 
  • Hull-less barley is a viable grain for finishing feedlot cattle.

The objectives of the first dried distillers grains plus solubles study were to determine the effect of increasing supplementation of corn dried distillers grains plus solubles on forage intake, average daily gain, gain efficiency and feeding behavior in growing cattle fed medium-quality hay.

Previous research suggested that ethanol byproducts, such as distillers grains, can be an effective supplement for forage-based diets. However, less is known about the effects of supplementation on feeding behavior and behavioral factors contributing to differences in animals' responses to supplements.

Animal sciences researchers conducted a recent study that indicates supplementation with dried distillers grains plus solubles increased growth performance and total dry-matter intake in growing steers fed medium-quality hay and reduced their hay intake and the time they spent consuming the hay.

In another dried distillers grains plus solubles study, animal sciences department researchers evaluated the effects of feeding forage-fed steers dried distillers grains plus solubles on alternate days as a way to reduce feed costs. Researchers discovered feeding only hay and only distillers grains on alternating days resulted in changes in forage intake and concentrations of volatile fatty acids produced in the rumen without affecting digestibility.

These results indicate that the reduction in forage intake and limited metabolic consequences warrant further investigation of alternate-day feeding schedules as an option when forage availability is limited.

The field pea finding resulted from a feedlot finishing study researchers at NDSU's Carrington Research Extension Center and the animal sciences department conducted to evaluate how including field peas in yearling beef heifer diets affected feedlot performance, carcass traits and palatability in different muscles in the carcass.

The researchers learned field peas do not have any adverse effects on performance or meat quality. However, including field peas in the cattle's diet did not increase beef tenderness, which was contrary to the researchers' expectations.

In the barley study, researchers substituted hull-less barley for corn at varying levels in a finishing study with 158 crossbred steers. The researchers found that feed intake decreased as the proportion of hull-less barley increased, but overall gains were not affected, resulting in an improvement in feed efficiency.

For more information on these studies and other recent NDSU beef cattle-related research, visit the "2012 North Dakota Beef Report," which is available at www.ag.ndsu.edu/cattledocs/research-reports.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Business Faculty to Publish Articles l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several NDSU College of Business faculty recently had articles accepted for publication. David Herda, assistant professor of accounting and information systems, and James Lavelle, a faculty member at the University of Texas Arlington, co-wrote the manuscript, “How the Auditor-Client Relationship Affects the Extent of Value-Added Service Provided to the Client.” Current Issues in Auditing accepted the manuscript for publication.

Limin Zhang, assistant professor of accounting and information systems, had her paper, “An Exploratory Study of Social Loafing in Asynchronous Virtual Collaboration,” accepted for publication in the International Journal of Information and Decision Sciences. She co-wrote the paper with Fang Chen from the University of Manitoba and Joe Latimer, NDSU computer science senior lecturer.

Joe Szmerekovsky, associate professor of management and marketing, co-wrote the article, “Technical Note – Managing a Secret Project,” which has been accepted for publication in Operations Research.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Faculty Publish Articles on Nursing Care of Native American Elders l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Donna Grandbois, assistant professor of nursing; Donald Warne, Master of Public Health program director; and Valerie Eschiti, a colleague from the University of Oklahoma, co-wrote the guest editorial, “The impact of history and culture on nursing care of Native American Elders.” It was published in the Journal of Gerontological Nursing.
Grandbois also co-wrote an article with Greg Sanders, associate dean of the College of Human Development and Education. Their article, “Resilience and stereotyping: The experiences of Native American elders,” was published in the Journal of Transcultural Nursing.

Grandbois, Warne and Eschiti are all Native American faculty. Grandbois and Eschiti are among the fewer than 30 American Indian nurses who have earned their doctorate.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Accounting Faculty Publish Article l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Jill Zuber, assistant professor of accounting, and Bonnie Klamm, professor of accounting at NDSU, had their article, “Sales/Use Tax: Nexus and E-Commerce,” accepted for publication in The CPA Journal.

The CPA Journalis a technical-refereed publication for financial professionals such as practitioners, educators and regulators. It covers areas of accounting, auditing, taxation, finance, management, technology and professional ethics.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Animal Sciences’ Beef Research Accepted for Publication l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several faculty, staff and students in the NDSU animal sciences department had research accepted for publication in the December 2012 issue of Meat Science, the official journal of the American Meat Science Association.

Kasey Maddock-Carlin, assistant professor of animal sciences; Vern Anderson, Extension research animal scientist; Wanda Keller, research specialist; Eric Berg, professor of animal sciences; and graduate students Breanne Ilse, James Magolski, Ashley Lepper and Christina Schwartz investigated the usefulness of raw meat surface characteristics in predicting cooked beef tenderness.

The article is titled “Predicting Beef Tenderness Using Color and Multispectral Image Texture Features.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Sheep Unit Aids Research, Education l 11/20/2012

November 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – On an ordinary-looking farmstead west of the NDSU campus, researchers are hoping to find answers to improve sheep production in North Dakota and throughout the U.S. NDSU's Sheep Unit also has two other roles: Extension Service specialists use it to share what the researchers have learned with producers and others in the sheep industry through open houses, field days, tours and other educational programs, and students in NDSU's animal sciences courses receive hands-on experience in working with livestock.

"We try to do projects here that are producer-friendly, that let us disseminate the information that producers can put into use immediately in their sheep operations," said Sheep Unit manager Skip Anderson.

A couple of projects include evaluating a commercially available pregnancy detection and litter size test, and assessing a recently approved product designed to improve out-of-season breeding. The Sheep Unit also is breeding for sheep that lamb naturally out of season. These genetics ultimately will be made available for sheep producers in the region to purchase.

Another way the Sheep Unit is helping producers is by enrolling three of the unit's flocks in the National Sheep Improvement Program, a performance-based genetic evaluation program designed to help sheep producers choose breeding stock with the best genetics. Programs such as this for other livestock species have proven to be the best method of identifying animals that excel in commercially important traits, but few sheep have been enrolled in the program, Redden says. Based on NDSU's experience, he'll be able to inform North Dakota sheep producers about how the program works and how it can benefit them.

NDSU recently completed a multiyear remodeling project at the Sheep Unit. It included upgrading the lambing facility and the main barn's ventilation, regrading and landscaping the pen area to improve drainage, adding a fence line feeding system, reroofing the main barn, and replacing windows and lighting. The main barn was built in the 1940s, and two other structures for housing sheep and an equipment storage building were added later.

Anderson says the fence line feeding system was a good addition. Workers place the feed along the fence outside of a pen, which means they don't need to go inside pens to feed the sheep and they can use a variety of equipment to deliver feed to the fence line. Having the sheep eat through the fence also reduces feed waste.

"This allows us to manage sheep in different pens, and monitor feed intake and feed usage," he adds.
The unit has four purebred flocks: Hampshire, established in 1915; Columbia, established in 1945; Katahdin, introduced in 1999; and Dorset, added in 2008. In all, the unit is home to 300 mature breeding ewes and about 15 rams.

In the Sheep Unit's academic role, it serves as a classroom for students in a variety of courses, including animal science, behavior and handling, as well as judging and evaluation, and the Veterinary Technology program. But it's no ordinary classroom.

"I require the students to get dirty to put them in a situation where they are working with animals and seeing what a shepherd does on a daily basis," Anderson said.

Anderson has three goals for the Sheep Unit: continue to be a leader in research that directly affects producers, use new technology to produce efficient and healthy sheep, and continue to provide a place for students to receive hands-on experience.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Grad Student Receives National Award l 11/5/2012

November 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU doctoral student Qixin Zhou of Nanjing, China, recently received a Love of Learning Award in the amount of $500 from the Phi Kappa Phi honor society. Zhou, who is studying mechanical engineering, is one of 140 recipients nationwide to receive the award, which helps fund post-baccalaureate studies and career development.

Zhou's research focuses on the degradation behavior of organic coatings under the guidance of Yechun Wang, assistant professor or mechanical engineering. She plans to use the award to attend chemical and mechanical engineering conferences.

The Phi Kappa Phi Love of Learning Award program was initiated in 2007 to help fund graduate or professional studies, doctoral dissertations, continuing education, career development and travel related to teaching and studies for active society members. The society's scholarship and award program awards $1 million each biennium to qualifying students and members through graduate fellowships, undergraduate study abroad scholarships, member and chapter awards and grants for local and national literacy initiatives.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private research universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


ND NASA EPSCoR Awarded $375,000 l 11/5/2012

November 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The North Dakota NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research has received a $375,000 Research Infrastructure Development award from NASA. The award, which is for the period 2012-2015 with matching funding provided by the North Dakota State Legislature, will be used to fund statewide NASA-relevant seed research, including graduate research assistantships and researcher travel to NASA centers for developing collaborative research. Faculty from NDSU and the University of North Dakota will be eligible to compete for these grants.

Questions may be directed to Santhosh Seelan, professor and chair of the Department of Space Studies at UND and director of North Dakota NASA EPSCoR, at seelan@space.edu. For more information, visit http://ndnasaepscor.und.edu. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


ND Water Research Institute Invites Research Fellowship Applications l 11/5/2012

November 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute invites applications for its 2013 Graduate Research Fellowship program.

NDSU and University of North Dakota graduate students who are conducting or planning research in water resources can apply for fellowships of varying duration – three months to one year. The fellowship funds must be applied between March 1, 2013, and Feb. 28, 2014. A technical completion report co-written by the fellow and the adviser is expected of each fellowship research project.

Research proposed for fellowship support should relate to water resources issues in the state or region. Regional, state or local collaborations or co-funding will strengthen an application. Fellowships have a matching requirement of two non-federal dollars to one federal dollar. At the time of applying, applicants should have a plan of study filed and/or should have a thesis research topic selected. Applications need to be prepared in consultation with advisers. Advisers of the applicant should co-sign the applications. Applications from students and advisers who have not met the reporting requirements of their previous fellowship projects will not be considered for funding.

The general criteria used for proposal evaluation include scientific merit, originality, research related to state or region, and extent of regional, state or local collaboration and/or co-funding. The proposals will be reviewed by a panel of state water resources professionals.

Announcement of awards will be made by early January subject to the appropriation of funds for the FY 2013 program by the federal government.

Consult the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute website at www.ndsu.edu/wrri for background information on the program and guidelines for preparation of applications. Applications are due by 5 p.m., Nov. 30.
NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Business Faculty to Publish Research on Opportunistic Claiming Behavior l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Gerrard Macintosh, chair and professor of marketing at NDSU, and Charles D. Stevens, professor of management, co-wrote the journal article, “Individual Differences in Opportunistic Claiming Behavior.” It will be published in the 2013 Journal of Consumer Behaviour.

“Service-oriented companies often financially compensate customers as one means of responding to bad customer service. Generally, research shows that when service failures occur, customers seek fair compensation,” Macintosh said. “However, some customers may demand higher compensation and in some cases seek compensation in excess of the amount of their actual loss. Our research investigates why some customers are more likely to seek higher compensation or to act opportunistically.”

Macintosh and Steven’s results show that two individual difference variables, conflict style and social value orientation, influence the amount claimed and opportunistic behavior. “Service businesses can enhance their abilities to resolve service failures by understanding different customer motives and perspectives,” Mcintosh said.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Animal Sciences Professors Publish, Receive Award l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kim Vonnahme, associate professor of animal sciences at NDSU, and Anna Grazul-Bilska, professor of animal sciences, were members of a collaborative research team awarded the Robert B. Hunt Endowed Award by the editorial board of the Journal of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Their paper, “Barbed vs. Standard Suture: Randomized in a Single-Blinded Comparison of Adhesion Formation and Ease of Use in an Animal Model,” was published in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology.

The award is given to the best paper published in the journal during the previous year. It will be presented Nov. 6 at the opening ceremony of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists’ 41st annual meeting.

A second paper, titled “Barbed vs. Standard Suture: Effects on Cellular Composition and Proliferation of the Healing Wound in the Ovine Uterus,” also was published as a result of the research project.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
 

NDSU Assistant Professor Receives Best Article Honorable Mention l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of English at NDSU, received a 2012 Best Article Honorable Mention from the English Leadership Quarterly, a publication of the Conference on English Leadership.
Her article, “Misgivings and Opportunities: The Common Core Writing Standards," was included in the October 2011 issue themed "Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts." The awards committee said  Sassi's piece included a  "realistic portrayal of the tensions surrounding the Common Core writing standards."

Sassi has a joint appointment at NDSU in English and education. Her research agenda focuses on social justice issues, including race in the classroom, fair practices in writing assessment, feminist research methodologies, pedagogical approaches to Native American literature, multicultural field experiences and the high school to college transition in writing. Sassi also co-wrote two books, Writing on Demand (2005) and A Student Guide to Writing on Demand (2006), with Anne Gere and Leila Christenbury. 

Sassi serves as a consultant for the National Council for Teachers of English and is a trainer for Project CRISS, a research-based learning strategies program.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


Fort Abercrombie History Project Receives Funding l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The Center for Heritage Renewal at NDSU has received a grant of $43,219 from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program to determine battlefield boundaries from the 1862 Siege of Fort Abercrombie, which was part of the Dakota War of 1862-64.

Tom Isern, center director and University Distinguished Professor of History at NDSU, is principal investigator for the investigation of the Siege of Fort Abercrombie. Richard Rothaus, an experienced investigator in the field of cultural resource management, joins the center’s team to perform substantial work on the project. Project plans also incorporate consultations with tribal historians and elders.

The grant is one of 27 National Park Service grants totaling $1.25 million to preserve and protect significant sites from all wars fought on American soil. Funded projects help preserve battlefields from the Colonial-Indian Wars through World War II and include site mapping, archaeological studies, National Register of Historic Places nominations, and preservation and management plans.

“One of the fine things about this project is that it engages NDSU students with this subject of profound importance in regional history – the Dakota War,” said Isern. “Aaron Barth, a doctoral student in history, is a research historian for the investigation, and students from the history department’s senior seminar are doing primary research on the siege.”
Federal, state, local and tribal governments, nonprofit organizations and educational institutions are eligible for National Park Service battlefield grants, which are awarded annually. NDSU is one of only three institutions of higher education to receive grants in the current round of the American Battlefield Protection Program. Additional information is available at www.nps.gov/history/hps/abpp. Members of the NDSU research team are posting highlights from their research at heritagerenewal.org.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
 

NDSU Assistant Professor’s Auditing Manuscript Published l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – David Herda, assistant professor of accounting at NDSU, co-wrote the manuscript, “Auditor Commitment to Privately-Held Clients and Its Effects on Value-Added Audit Service,” which was accepted for publication in Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory.

Herda’s study examines auditor commitment to clients and how it affects the level of value-added audit service provided to them. His results “highlight the important role that perceptions of client fairness play in engendering social exchange relationships between individual auditors and clients.” His results also show higher quality relationships lead to higher levels of service. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Associate Professor’s Findings on Distillers Grains Published l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kendall Swanson, associate professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at NDSU, co-wrote a publication titled “Influence of feeding increasing levels of dry corn distillers grains plus solubles in whole corn grain-based finishing diets on total tract digestion, nutrient balance and excretion in beef steers.” The article appeared in the Journal of Animal Science Sept. 5.

Swanson studied the effects of increasing dry distillers grains plus solubles inclusion up to 50 percent of the diet dry matter in finishing cattle diets. He found feeding up to 50 percent of the diet as dry distillers grains plus solubles did not have a negative effect on nutrient retention by the animal, but increased the excretion of nitrogen and minerals (phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, sulfur and potassium). When feeding high levels of distillers grains, implications of increased nutrient concentrations in manure should be considered when developing manure management plans and when using manure as fertilizer.

Swanson’s work was completed at the University of Guelph with the help of his graduate student and others before he started his position at NDSU. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
 

Management and Marketing Faculty at NDSU to Publish Papers l 10/23/2012

Oct. 23, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Faculty in the Department of Management and Marketing at NDSU recently had papers accepted for publication.

Associate professor Rodney Traub co-wrote the paper, “Beyond the Use of Robotics: Operations and Supply Chain Control for Effective Inventory Management in a Health System Pharmacy,” that was accepted for the Annals of Information Systems’ special issue on “Medical Informatics.” The serialized, numbered volumes of the Annals of Information Systems address specialized topics or themes and are guest-edited by authorities in the specific areas. The volumes are available as individual books or as a serialized collection. The Annals of Information Systems series is allied with the Integrated Series in Information Systems (known as IS2).

Jin Li, assistant professor, and Chanchai Tangpong, associate professor, co-wrote the paper, “The Role of Interfirm Reciprocity Norm and Agent Conscientiousness in Supply Contract Adjustment Decision,” that was accepted for the Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing. The journal provides marketing faculty and executives with new ideas concerning business-to-business marketing.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
 

Initial Results Reported as NDSU CNSE Lab Analyzes Clay Samples from ND Oilpatch l 10/22/2012

Oct. 22, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Initial results of clay samples from western North Dakota show varying percentages of alumina content, a finding of interest to the North Dakota Geological Survey that commissioned the study. Scientists in a lab at North Dakota State University’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) are completing analysis of the clay, often referred to as kaolin, which could eventually play a role in proppants used for hydraulic fracturing in North Dakota oil exploration.

As part of a research agreement with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) in Bismarck, N.D., the Materials Characterization and Analysis Laboratory at NDSU CNSE is completing initial analysis of more than 200 clay samples from Stark and Dunn counties in North Dakota to determine their composition and suitability for use as a component in hydraulic fracturing. “The alumina (Al203 content) was above 20 percent for 66 percent of the Bear Den claystone samples and 38 percent of the Rhame Bed samples,” said Ed Murphy, North Dakota state geologist. “Roughly one third of the sites sampled averaged above 20 percent alumina for the entire exposed bed thickness.” 

A final report of the study conducted at NDSU CNSE is expected in late 2012 or early 2013. “We generated an alumina map of western North Dakota that companies can use to guide clay exploration if they determine that the alumina content issufficiently high for their needs,” explained Murphy.  “We will publish a final report with the clay mineralogy when that information is available.” https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/Clay map/GI_158.pdf

Murphy said it was extremely useful to have specialized scientific expertise available in North Dakota to conduct the study. “CNSE utilizes excellent analytical equipment and employs knowledgeable people with valuable experience. We have had a very good working relationship with the NDSU CNSE. We found them to be very dedicated to their work and generating a product that we could have confidence in.”

The clays show early promise for potential use as a key material known as ceramic proppant, used in the fracking process to help keep fractures open, particularly in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota. “It could potentially lead to the establishment of a ceramic proppant manufacturing plant if these claystones are determined to be suitable for this process.  The chemistry and bed thickness that we are providing will answer a number of the initial questions from industry,” explained Murphy. “If companies deem these results to be promising, they could potentially do additional exploration on their own which might ultimately lead to test manufacturing of ceramic proppant using these  clays.”
Currently, proppants used in western North Dakota oil development typically come from other states or other countries. Murphy notes that companies will use approximately five million tons of proppants in North Dakota oil development in 2012. In a recent report, the North Dakota Geological Survey estimates about 1.7 billion tons of economically mineable kaolin in western North Dakota.

Researchers at NDSU CNSE use x-ray fluorescenceto determine which elements and how much of those elements the samples contain.  CNSE scientists also conduct analysis of clay samples using x-ray diffraction to determine the amount of kaolinite, illite, chlorite and other substances in the samples.

“We frequently partner with agencies and industry on projects,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research at NDSU. “CNSE provides specialized instrumentation and scientific expertise to a variety of research partners across a spectrum of industries.” 

About NDSU CNSE
NDSU's Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, conducts multidisciplinary research with partners in government, industry, private and university sectors. CNSE's scientific capabilities include materials characterization and analysis, flexible electronics and materials, electronics miniaturization, wireless sensors, RFID, bioactive materials, combinatorial science, and coatings technologies. www.ndsu.edu/cnse

About North Dakota State University
NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in computer science, chemistry, and physical sciences, social sciences, and agricultural sciences, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


NDSU Receives $4.9 Million from National Institutes of Health for Biomedical Research l 10/16/2012

October 16, 2012, Fargo, N.D. –– Biomedical researchers at North Dakota State University (NDSU) have received a $4.9 million, five-year research grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for new strategies for targeting protease (pro’ tee aze) in disease (Grant No.: 1P30GM103332-01). Dr. Mukund Sibi, university distinguished professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, leads the research team. The funding provides continuing support for a nationally competitive biomedical center at NDSU, focused on fighting diseases such as cancer, asthma, hypertension and arthritis.

With the latest round of competitive funding, NDSU has received a total of $24 million in awards through the NIH Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) over the past 12 years. Initial funding was used to develop scientific labs, recruit exceptional research faculty, provide research opportunities for students, and conduct science outreach activities in the region. The funding helped to establish the Center for Protease Research at NDSU, along with a Core Biology Facility and a Core Synthesis Facility used by researchers across the region. The labs are available to scientists for research, data analysis and consultations.

A major scientific focus for the Center is cancer. NDSU researchers are focusing on breast cancer, prevention of prostate cancer, the effect of nutrition and diet on cancer and on compounds that show promise in treating certain cancers. In addition, a partnership has been forged for future research opportunities with Sanford Research and Sanford Health, headquartered in Sioux Falls, S.D., and Fargo, N.D.

“The nationally significant biomedical research being conducted at NDSU illustrates the type of contributions our faculty and students make to the state and beyond,” said NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani. “This research funding further recognizes NDSU’s role as one of the top 108 research institutions in the U.S. with very high research activity, as defined by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.”

“The Center for Protease Research’s contributions to help combat disease, as well as providing research opportunities across campus and the region, are significant,” said NDSU Provost J. Bruce Rafert. “These efforts, coupled with our research partnerships through the state-supported Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications and the North Dakota Genomics Institute constitute a commitment to life sciences research at NDSU.”

The Center for Protease Research at NDSU also supports science outreach efforts. Undergraduate students have annually presented posters on their scientific research performed at NDSU, including students from across the U.S. participating in the Center’s summer research program. The competitive program brings outstanding students to NDSU for scientific research in state-of-the-art lab settings. Students from North Dakota tribal colleges also participate in Center-based research. Local high school students participate as part of the Parents’ Involvement in Children, Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science program at NDSU. The Center also sponsors scientific symposia and seminars, bringing nationally and internationally recognized scientists to NDSU.

Phase I of the program focused on developing research infrastructure and providing junior investigators with mentoring and funds to compete for research grants. Phase II of the program included five projects, 11 pilot projects and two core laboratory facilities. An external advisory board of prominent U.S. scientists evaluates the program. It is anticipated by the end of Phase III, the self-sustaining core laboratories will support multiple disciplines, while strengthening biomedical research of the university and the state. Since 2001, researchers associated with the NDSU Center for Protease Research have published nearly 380 reports in scientific journals about their research.

“These types of grant awards are based upon an extremely competitive process,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU. “It again illustrates the caliber of faculty at NDSU who are exceptional researchers, while providing opportunities for students. The strides made by the Center for Protease Research and Director Mukund Sibi significantly contribute to growth of biomedical research in the region. Dr. Sibi and his team have laid the foundation for continued research excellence in the life sciences, providing opportunities previously not available in the state.”

“Understanding the biological role played by proteases, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and histone deacetylases (HDAC) in cancer and other diseases such as asthma is extremely important. Our research represents an exciting and emerging target for cancer chemotherapy and treatment of autoimmune diseases,” said Dr. Sibi. The MMPs belong to a class of enzymes called proteases that degrade proteins by cutting them into small pieces. Too much or too little MMP activities can contribute to diseases such as cancer. Controlling enzyme activity by using pharmaceuticals is seen as a potential strategy for treating the diseases.

Assistant professor Katie Reindl is focusing on how bioactive chemicals in foods can prevent the progression of various cancers. “We are interested in understanding the underlying mechanisms of how these food components influence cancer cell behavior, with the purpose of using these or similar agents for cancer therapy.”  Reindl initially became involved with the Center for Protease Research as a graduate student in pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU. Since then, the Center has provided support for her research as a faculty member in biological sciences, while enabling her to support additional graduate students in her research.

Another participant in the CPR is focusing on chronic complications of allergic asthma caused by fungus. Dr. Jane Schuh became involved in the CPR in 2007. “Recently, we have used insights gained with our work and are applying it to another problem. What happens when you have allergic asthma and are exposed to grain dust?” Schuh, associate professor in immunology, veterinary and microbiological sciences, notes the Center’s research support, ability to bring together biomedical researchers from different disciplines, scientific collaboration, and mentoring by CPR scientists and external advisory board members, all contribute to advancement of research.

NDSU investigators most recently participating in the Center for Protease Research include:  Peggy Biga, Kendra Greenlee and Katie Reindl in biological sciences; Christopher Colbert, Gregory Cook, Glenn Dorsam, Stuart Haring, Svetlana Kilina, Guodong Liu, Erika Offerdahl, Mukund Sibi, Sangita Sinha and Pinjing Zhao in chemistry and biochemistry; Jodie Haring and Tao Wang in the Core Biology Facility; Bin Guo, Steven Qian and Chengwen Sun in pharmaceutical sciences; John McEvoy and Jane Schuh in microbiology and immunology; and Rajesh Murthy, Yonghua Yang and Ganesh Bala in the NDSU Core Synthesis Facility.

Research reported in this publication is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under award No. 5 P20 RR015566-10.

About the NDSU Center for Protease Research
The Center for Protease Research (CPR) at NDSU has broad-based research programs to provide fundamental information on how proteases impact diseases. The Center carries out cutting-edge research in biomedical science, fostering growth of biomedical research in North Dakota by combining expertise from various NDSU departments in multi-disciplinary basic research to help combat diseases. Research at the CPR is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources and National Institute of General Medical Sciences as a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence.

The Core Biology Facility at NDSU, established in 2003, is a molecular biology, tissue culture, and bioassay laboratory with the scientific expertise to teach and train new users with techniques that may impact their science. The Core Synthesis Facility (CSF), established in 2008, is used to synthesize small molecules to assist in drug discovery and to supply reagents for use in biological systems. The CSF is the only synthesis facility of its type in a large region of the central northern plains. These Core laboratories serve Center of Biomedical Research Excellence investigators, as well as other investigators in and outside North Dakota.

Center Director, Dr. Mukund Sibi, has a wide range of synthetic expertise. He received the prestigious Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society in 2008. He was named a university distinguished professor and received the Paul Juell Mentorship Award in 2011 from the NDSU College of Science and Mathematics. Sibi joined the NDSU faculty in 1987. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Bangalore University in India and his doctorate from City University of New York. He held postdoctoral positions at Dartmouth College and University of Waterloo.

About North Dakota State University
NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in computer science, chemistry, and physical sciences, social sciences, and agricultural sciences, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


NDSU Microbiology Student Receives Research Fellowship l 10/15/2012

Oct. 15, 2012, Fargo, N.D. ––  NDSU senior Breanne Steffan received the prestigious Undergraduate Research Fellowship from the American Society of Microbiology. Steffan is a microbiology major from Fargo.

The fellowship is aimed at highly competitive students who want to pursue graduate careers in microbiology. Fellows have the opportunity to conduct full-time summer research at their institution with a society mentor and present their research results at the 113th General Meeting of the society in Denver, if their abstract is accepted.

Each fellow receives up to a $4,000 stipend, a two-year student membership to the society and funding for travel expenses to the Presentation Institute and General Meeting. This year, 122 applications were received and 56 were awarded.

Jane Schuh, assistant dean for academic programs and associate professor of veterinary and microbiological sciences, is Steffan’s research mentor. The title of their research project is “Antibody impact on allergic fungal asthma.”


NDSU Entomologist Receives Research Grant l 10/12/2012

Oct. 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. ––  Jason Harmon, assistant professor of entomology in the School of Natural Resource Sciences at NDSU, is a principal investigator on a five-year, $1.97 million collaborative National Science Foundation grant titled “The Role of Taxonomic, Functional, Genetic and Landscape Diversity in Food Web Responses to a Changing Environment.”

The research is centered on aphid pests and will study food webs to understand various dimensions of biodiversity and their impacts on ecosystem resilience under the context of agricultural systems. Collaborators include scientists from the University of Wisconsin and University of Georgia.

The research in Harmon’s proposal is funded by National Science Foundation’s Division of Environmental Biology grant award No. 1241031. The NDSU portion of the grant is $320,125.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Associate Dean Presents in Boston l 10/12/2012

Oct. 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. ––  David Buchanan, associate dean for academic programs in the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources, presented at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group held Sept. 20-22 in Boston. The meeting’s theme was “cruising in the ruins: the question of disciplinarity in the post/medieval university.”
Buchanan presented “Agriculture and the Humanities: How education became the family business for the children of a tinsmith and a blacksmith” during the session titled Families Old and New.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Management Assistant Professor Publishes Ethics Research l 10/12/2012

Oct. 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. ––  Sukumarakurup Krishnakumar, assistant professor of management at NDSU, and Doug Rymph, co-wrote the paper, “Uncomfortable Ethical Decisions: The Role of Negative Emotions and Emotional Intelligence in Ethical Decision-making,” which has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Managerial Issues.

“The intriguing relationship between morality and emotions goes a long way,” Krishnakumar said. “The previous few years have seen a number of accounting/management scandals and ethical violations in the business world (e.g. Enron). In this paper, we examined how emotions could influence managerial ethical decision-making, and the impact of emotional intelligence on the ethicality of decisions. Though it is widely known that ethical dilemmas involving other employees/managers are inherently emotional, not many studies have looked at this phenomenon.”

In two experimental studies, they found that such strong negative emotions as sadness and anger influenced individuals to make less ethical decisions, and that emotional intelligent individuals were able to make ethical decisions against the biasing influence of those negative emotions.

“As far as we are aware, this is the first empirical study to test the direct influence of emotional intelligence in ethical decision-making in a business context,” Krishnakumar said. “In light of these findings, organizations should consider selection and training procedures that will enable the use of emotional intelligence at work. This includes using well-established and validated tests for selecting and/or re-assigning employees and training procedures to enhance emotional intelligence skills of existing employees.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


TECHNOLOGY CREATED AT NDSU LICENSED TO C2RENEW CORP. Start-up Company Developed from NDSU Research Discovery l 10/10/2012

Oct. 10, 2012, Fargo, N.D. ––  A technology developed at North Dakota State University, Fargo, creates performance- driven biocomposite materials by incorporating agricultural by-products into plastics for a wide range of engineering applications. The technology also has led to a new start-up company set to serve a spectrum of markets. c2renew corp., a start-up company based in Colfax, N.D., announced today that it has concluded a license agreement with the NDSU Research Foundation (NDSU/RF) for the green technology.

Developed by Dr. Chad Ulven, associate professor of mechanical engineering and his research team at NDSU, the technology could be used anywhere commodity thermoplastics are typically used—but has been focused on agricultural equipment applications such as interior/exterior handles, consoles, and protective shrouds, as well as under-the-hood belt guards, fan shrouds, and ducting.

The technology offsets the costs and need to use petroleum-based polymers/plastics by using renewable agricultural by-products that are currently considered waste, being used as animal feed/bedding, or used as low-cost combustion by-products for heat energy.

“Six years ago, it was my vision from the start to see my research end up in a company located in North Dakota which supplies renewable based materials to a variety of molding companies, benefits agricultural producers, and is staffed with engineers who want to stay in this region with high-tech, well-paid positions,” said Ulven.

The process methodology developed by Ulven and his team uses lignocellulosic fibers from various agricultural sources mixed in with commodity thermoplastics to reinforce and strengthen the plastics. This method works with virgin and recycled commodity and engineered thermoplastics such as polyolefins and polyamides, respectively, where other natural fiber reinforcing processes have not succeeded, according to Dr. Ulven, who also serves as chief technology officer for c2renew.

The green technology developed at NDSU and licensed to c2renew has shown that agricultural by-products can improve stiffness, strength, heat stability, dimensional tolerance, and resistance to UV exposure when introduced correctly to plastics, while lowering the cost of the material. The company has conducted trials with the improved plastics in coordination with several global agricultural, heavy equipment and motor vehicle manufacturers.

“c2renew designs biocomposite materials to meet the performance specifications required by our customers with lower cost, renewable resources,” said Ulven. “We not only supply companies with drop-in plastic replacement solutions, but also assist them with component and process design.”

Michael Fuqua is a partner in developing the technology. He formerly served as a graduate student and postdoctoral research associate of Dr. Ulven’s at NDSU and is now a technical consultant for c2renew. Development of this technology was primarily funded by commodity groups in the state, such as the North Dakota Corn Council and AmeriFlax. Initial funding which helped the company conduct trials of their materials was provided by the North Dakota Agricultural Products Utilization Commission (APUC).

“Start-up companies generated by NDSU research provide pathways to economic success. The coordinated efforts among NDSU researchers, the university’s Technology Transfer Office and the NDSU Research Foundation help lay the groundwork for commercialization of discoveries developed at NDSU,” noted Philip Boudjouk, vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer.

“Licensing of this process methodology to c2renew represents a great opportunity to commercialize this research,” said Dale Zetocha, executive director of the NDSU Research Foundation. “In addition, licensing the technology to a North Dakota company further supports technology-led economic development in the state.”

The NDSU Research Foundation’s technology and licensing income from NDSU research discoveries has grown from less than $1 million in fiscal year 2000 to more than $2 million in fiscal year 2012. NDSU inventors, colleges and departments actively involved in developing innovations share in net revenue distributed by the Research Foundation.

About c2renew

c2renew, based in Colfax, N.D., designs, produces and supplies compounded biocomposites. The start-up company provides a drop-in material replacement that is a greener alternative to purely petroleum-based plastic products at a lower cost than traditional plastics, without sacrificing critical performance metrics. The process methodology licensed to c2renew from North Dakota State University utilizes agricultural by-products such as sunflower hulls, sugarbeet pulp, flax shive, and corn fiber from distiller’s dried grains with solubles that result from ethanol production to provide a higher value-added use for these by-products, while reducing the cost of input materials for molders of plastic components.

About the NDSU Research Foundation

The NDSU Research Foundation is an independent, not-for-profit organization that supports NDSU in its teaching, research and public service missions. The Foundation manages the intellectual properties developed by faculty, staff and students doing research at NDSU and facilitates commercialization of these technologies. By commercializing intellectual property, the Foundation is able to create resources that are returned to the individual inventors and to the University to promote continued research. www.ndsuresearchfoundation.org

About NDSU

NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in computer science, chemistry, and physical, social and agricultural sciences, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


October Science Café Explores Amazing World of Microbes l 10/9/2012

October 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – “Amazing World of Microbes: the Good, the Bad, the Ugly and the Beautiful” is the title of the Science Café presentation held on Oct. 9 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson, downtown Fargo.

Birgit Pruess, associate professor in the Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, discusses the large, diverse and intriguing microbial world.

“We are all painfully aware that microbes can make us sick at times. Do we also know that there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in and on our bodies than there are human cells?” Pruess asks. “Who recognizes that half of the oxygen we breathe has been produced by all those microbes that inhabit our oceans? How did the alcohol get into that glass of wine?”

In her presentation, Pruess covers some of the good, bad and downright ugly characteristics of microbes and provide answers to attendees’ questions. To complement the discussion, she presents images produced in her research lab.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation’s top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU, Monsanto Partner to Develop Better Wheat Varieties l 10/9/2012

October 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU and Monsanto announced Sept. 21 a collaboration that will allow both to improve their wheat breeding programs. The collaboration brings together the breeding research of Monsanto and NDSU to develop better wheat varieties.

"We are pleased and excited about this opportunity to accelerate our hard red spring wheat breeding program with this research partnership," said Ken Grafton, NDSU vice president for agricultural affairs; director of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station; and dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources. "Having our wheat improvement team utilize Monsanto's advanced breeding technology tools is an important step in allowing the NDSU program to remain successful well into the future. And joint research projects to develop new breeding and genetic tools will improve the breeding efficiencies of our programs, with the ultimate goal of providing the best genetic material to the North Dakota wheat grower."

"We are committed to delivering improvements in wheat through advancements in breeding and are pleased to be working with a public university that shares our commitment to enhancing the productivity of wheat," added Anthony Osborne, Monsanto wheat business development lead. "Monsanto has a strong history of collaborating with universities and public sector institutions around the world, and we believe growers will continue to benefit from collaborations that bring together complementary wheat research programs."

The relationship is consistent with the National Association of Wheat Growers' call for investment in wheat, and during a time when interest and support for new technologies in wheat remains high.

"Wheat producers always have sought new technologies to enhance their competitive advantage and move the industry forward," said Neal Fisher, North Dakota Wheat Commission administrator. "This public/private relationship builds on the longstanding producer partnership with NDSU, offering technological advancements to improve the competitiveness of wheat in all sectors, including greater producer profitability, continued emphasis on quality and premium end-use performance and ensuring the wheat industry's role as a leading contributor to the economy of North Dakota."


Elias M. Elias Named NDSU University Distinguished Professor l 10/9/2012

October 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani has recognized Elias M. Elias, professor of plant sciences, as a University Distinguished Professor. Bresciani made the announcement Oct. 4, during his annual State of the University Address.

NDSU established the University Distinguished Professorships to recognize the accomplishments of faculty. Professors who earn the designation have at least 10 years at NDSU of outstanding teaching, service, research and reputation within their disciplines. The designation is the highest honor NDSU has to celebrate outstanding faculty.

“Dr. Elias’ scholarly accomplishments and contributions to some of the most pressing needs of our state, nation and increasingly the world, define this recognition which he so richly deserves,” Bresciani said.

Elias, who joined NDSU in 1990, works with the durum wheat breeding and genetics program as the J.F. Carter Durum Wheat Breeding/Genetics Endowed Professor. The program develops durum wheat varieties to maximize the economic return for producers and provide excellent quality durum wheat for the pasta industry and international export market. He has been named Durum Man of the Year by the U.S. Durum Growers Association. He is the recipient of NDSU’s Larson/Yaggie Excellence in Research Award, Early Career, and the Waldron Award for Excellence in Research.

Elias earned his bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Aleppo University in Syria and his master’s in plant pathology from Montana State University. He earned his doctorate in agronomy from NDSU.

Elias joins a select group of faculty members with the designation, including Allan Ashworth, geosciences; Bill Perrizo, computer science; Mukund Sibi, chemistry and molecular biology; Neil Gudmestad, plant pathology; Bill Wilson, agribusiness and applied economics; Kalpana Katti, civil engineering; Tom Isern, history and religion; Jo Ann Miller, music; and Larry Reynolds, animal science.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education; that designation puts the university in the top 2 percent of all private and public universities in the nation.


NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present l 10/9/2012

October 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, presented the opening keynote address at the Southwest District Association of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance conference held in June. The title of the address was “The ROLE of a Leader.” Strand also presented the opening keynote address at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Leadership Development conference held in June. The title of the address was “Communicating Appreciation – Working with Colleagues.”

Abby Gold, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences and NDSU Extension Service, received funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture and Food Research Initiatives, with land grant faculty from Cankdeska Cikana Community College to study food literacy and explore the use of the Indigenous Evaluation Framework in the creation of a food literacy measurement tool.

Scott Allen, an alumni of the advanced athletic training master’s degree program; Kevin Miller (adviser), assistant professor in health, nutrition and exercise sciences; Jay Albrecht, former faculty member in health, nutrition and exercise sciences; Julie Garden-Robinson, professor in health, nutrition and exercise sciences; and Beth Blodgett-Salafia, assistant professor in human development and family science, had a manuscript accepted in the Journal of Athletic Training. The study entitled “Ad libitum fluid intake and plasma responses following pickle juice, hypertonic saline, and deionized water ingestion” examined how much water individuals drink when they consume salty beverages after exercise. The results debunk the claim that drinking small volumes of pickle juice or saline decrease thirst and the volume of water ingested after exercise.

Christi McGeorge, associate professor in human development and family science at NDSU; Kristen Benson, assistant professor in human development and family science; and Tom Stone Carlson, associate professor in human development and family science, were recently awarded two grants to support their research and projects associated with the NDSU Family Therapy Center. They received $60,000 from the Otto Bremer Foundation and $3,500 from the Fargo-Moorhead Area Foundation to increase the capacity of therapists and mental health agencies in the Fargo-Moorhead area to provide competent services to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.

Brent Young, associate professor of agricultural and extension education, will present a paper titled “Exploring the Technical Expression of Academic Knowledge: The Science-in-CTE Pilot Study” at the Association of Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference to be held in Atlanta, in November.

Wendi Stachler, 2012 spring master’s graduate and adjunct instructor in the School of Education, will present a paper titled “Sustainability of Professional Development to Enhance Student Achievement: A Shift in the Professional Development Paradigm” at the 2012 North Central Conference of the American Association of Agricultural Education to be held in Champaign, Ill. The purpose of the study was to determine the sustainability of professional development and teacher utilization of the Science-in-CTE pedagogical model and CTE science-enhanced lessons in curricula one year following the Science-in-CTE Pilot Study.

Bryan Christensen, associate professor of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences at NDSU, presented the following paper at the American College of Sports Medicine national conference in San Francisco: “Improved flexibility and core strength in four different levels of acute Pilates.” Co-authors were Lori Bruns, master student in exercise science, and Sherri Stastny, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences. Christensen also recently presented the following at the International Society of Sports Biomechanics conference in Melbourne, Australia.“

Beth Blodgett Salafia and Kristen Benson, assistant professors in human development and education, and Jessica Lemer, a previous human development and family science master’s student, recently had an article accepted for publication in the International Journal of Sexual Health. The title of the article is “The relationship between college women's sexual attitudes and sexual activity: The mediating role of body image.”

In addition, Benson had the article, “Seeking support: Transgender client experiences with mental health services, ” accepted for publication in the Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, and the article “The Queer Affirmative Caucus: 25 years of affirming sexual orientation and gender identity” published in the August issue of Family Therapy Magazine.

Stacy Duffield, associate professor of practice in the School of Education, received two grant sub-awards totaling $8,000 from Fargo Public Schools to determine the impact of curriculum materials developed with grant funding from the North Dakota and Arkansas Humanities Councils. The curriculum covers the 1957 desegregation of the Little Rock public schools and the role Judge Ronald N. Davies played in the historical event.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor in the School of Education and English at NDSU, presented a paper at the International Conference of Applied Social Sciences: “A Review of the Literature in Education on Pedagogical Approaches to Native American/American Indian Literatures.”


National Science Foundation Award Bolsters “Big Data” Research at NDSU l 9/13/2012

September 13, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – This is big. When it comes to research, scientists often generate oceans of data, which can create challenges to capture, store, analyze and understand. Standard computer systems cannot handle what is known as “big data”— high-volume, high-velocity data sets that are often in the terabyte and soon will be in the petabyte range. The National Science Foundation, in a competitive grant process, has awarded North Dakota State University a $400,000 grant over three years to create a Data-Intensive Cyberinfrastructure for Research and Education at NDSU, Fargo. The Office of the Provost will provide more than $171,000 in additional required matching funding. The computing infrastructure will be housed in NDSU’s Research and Technology Park.

The award will enhance research capabilities at NDSU. It will also provide opportunities for high school and undergraduate students, as well as students from underrepresented groups in computational research, said Dr. Martin Ossowski, director of the Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST) at NDSU, which will oversee the computational enhancements for researchers and a co-author of the grant proposal.

When completed, the system will be used by NDSU faculty, students and staff for research in photophysics and photochemistry, plasma physics, new-generation energy conversion devices, multifunctional nanomaterials, biomimetics and coatings, computational biology, clay micromechanics, human brain injury under blast and impact, overland flow modeling, climatology and agroinformatics, structural monitoring of bridges, data mining, stochastic and bio-inspired computing, design automation of system-on-chip and many other computational research areas. NDSU undergraduate students will be integrated into several of the research projects and data-intensive computing will be incorporated into senior design projects.

“The grant award will be used to develop and operate a new generation of advanced computing infrastructure at NDSU, Fargo,” said Provost J. Bruce Rafert. “The resources that NSF provided to NDSU through this highly competitive award both recognize and accelerate NDSU’s emerging leadership in cyber infrastructure.” The new system will consist of tiered storage subsystems, tape library subsystem serving policy-driven near-line active archive, and a heterogeneous distributed memory compute cluster.

“These facilities will allow researchers access to additional state-of-the-art research computing resources, where ‘big data’ analytics are transparently coupled to high-performance modeling and simulation environments,” said Ossowski. “What we are really excited about is that the system is designed to expand as NDSU’s computational needs grow, by using what’s called a ‘condominium model’ where individual researchers and research groups will be able to plug in their own hardware modules, resulting in unprecedented economies of scale.”

The system will be tightly integrated with national resources including the National Science Foundation’s Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) and the NSF-Department of Energy cross-agency Open Science Grid.

Outreach efforts of NDSU’s Computational Research and Education initiative will include working with dynamic student groups. With the grant, NDSU plans to develop high-performance computing (HPC) Summer Days to provide training in HPC for students in the Nurturing American Tribal Undergraduate Research and Education (NATURE) program. A cooperative effort between the state’s research universities and tribal colleges located in the region, NATURE offers opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math to tribal college students. NATURE is an initiative of tribal colleges and the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. Civil engineering chair Eakalak Kahn coordinates the NATURE program and Ruth Hopkins serves as ND EPSCoR Tribal Colleges liaison manager.

In addition, outreach efforts will include developing HPC Spring Days, a week-long program for local area high-school students. Proposed activities will include data intensive computing, as well as mentorship by an NDSU faculty member. Future outreach efforts will include HPC Fall Days, a project-based semester-long activity that pairs students involved in the ESTEEM Institute with NDSU mentors to tackle real-life computational science problems. The Institute, in its initial phases, includes area schools and colleges working to encourage opportunities for students in science, technology, engineering and math.

The NDSU Major Research Instrumentation team will also work with Dr. Pavan Balaji, a computer scientist from Argonne National Laboratory. He serves as Chair of the Technical Committee on Scalable Computing (TCSC) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Dr. Balaji will augment outreach activities by using NDSU facilities as a computing test ground to conduct the Midwest portion of a data-intensive programming competition called the IEEE TCSC HPC Cup. NDSU’s future outreach efforts also could include computational opportunities with private sector partners.

Twenty-five leading NDSU computational researchers contributed to the proposal to the National Science Foundation. Professor Dinesh Katti serves as principal investigator. Co-principal investigators include Anne Denton, Samee Khan, Martin Ossowski, and Wenfang Sun. NDSU faculty contributing to the proposal include Cristinel Ababei, Iskander Akhatov, Adnan Akyuz, Bret Chisholm, Xeufeng Chu, Doğan Çömez, Sivaguru Jayaraman, Kalpana Katti, Svetlana Kilina, Ghodrat Karami, Muhammet Erkan Köse, Andrei Kryjevski, Juan Li, Simone A. Ludwig, William Perrizo, Saeed Salem, Alexander Wagner, Yechun Wang, Changhui Yan, Mijia Yang, and Mariusz Ziejewski.

“The success of the proposal illustrates the importance of computational science as a unifying driver to researchers across the university,” said Dinesh Katti, principal investigator for the successful proposal. “The rapid growth of computational power, along with important developments in computationally-driven science and engineering, has and will aid in major discoveries in a wide variety of fields.”

“Computation often serves as a fourth dimension of research,” said Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer. “When looking for a needle in what are essentially billions of data haystacks, the new tools provided by this initiative become critical to researchers.”

The Data-Intensive Cyberinfrastructure for Research and Education (DICRE) at NDSU will be managed by the Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology. The process to set up the computational infrastructure at NDSU is expected to take more than six months. DICRE at NDSU is funded by National Science Foundation Award No. 1229316.

About North Dakota State University

CCAST at NDSU, provides high-performance computing infrastructure for the university, its Research and Technology Park and their industrial partners, and engages in its own original research. NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in computer science, chemistry, and physical, social and agricultural sciences, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


NDSU Animal Sciences Professor Awarded Breast Cancer Grant l 9/4/2012

September 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Chung Park, NDSU professor of animal sciences, was recently awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. The grant money, which totals $285,000 for two years, will be used to investigate whether supplementing methyl nutrients (choline, folate, vitamin B12 and methionine) in a mother’s diet will reduce the risk of her offspring developing breast cancer.

Park has received grant funds from the institute three times, the Department of Defense Medical Research Program twice and the American Institute for Cancer Research for his studies on the epigenetic influence of maternal dietary lipotropes (methyl nutrients including methionine, choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12) upon udder development, lactation and mammary carcinogenesis.  Park’s lab also recently received a grant from the Northern Canola Growers Association for $54,000. For the past several years, the USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the Northern Canola Growers Association have been supporting Park’s research on canola oil and human health.

The research is supported by the National Institutes of Health grant number 1R15CA164768-01A1. This content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Assistant Professor Gives Keynote at Nanotechnology Conference l 9/4/2012

September 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Andriy Voronov, NDSU assistant professor of coatings and polymeric materials, presented an invited keynote lecture at the third International Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications. He also served as a scientific committee member for the conference program. The conference was held at the McGill University, Montreal, Canada, Aug. 7-9.

Voronov’s topic was “Self-Assembly of Invertible Polymeric Micelles: New Promise for Polymer-Based Nanopharmaceuticals.” Voronov described the work of his NDSU research group on responsive polymeric micelles, nanomaterials that may have potential for many applications, including drug delivery. The micelles developed in Voronov’s group possess a unique ability to remain stable in homogeneous environments and rapidly invert their conformation, based on subtle changes in polarity of the environment. The approach is considered a new and promising concept in developing polymer micelles-based nanopharmaceuticals.

ICNFA is a series of international conferences that focus on all aspects of nanotechnology, with a goal to bring together international researchers working in the field and foster an environment conducive to research advancement. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Communication Professor Presents at International Conference l 9/4/2012

September 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Robert S. Littlefield, NDSU professor of communication, presented at the fourth Tokyo Conference on Argumentation sponsored by the Japan Debate Association held Aug. 10-12 at Sophia University in Kanagawa, Japan.

Littlefield and Michael D. Bartanen, professor of communication at Pacific Lutheran University, co-wrote the manuscript, “The Cultural Influences of Forensics Practice: The Cold War and Its Influence on American Forensics,” selected for inclusion in the conference proceedings.

Littlefield and Bartanen argued the onset of the Cold War in the United States had a significant effect on the nature of secondary and post-secondary education, including co-curricular activities such as forensics competition. Their paper discussed significant changes in American forensics resulting from a societal shift toward relying on schools and universities to produce increasing numbers of scientists, government workers and teachers and providing educational opportunities for citizens who formerly did not perceive the value or opportunity for higher education.

According to the paper, forensics was transformed by the significant change in the number of people seeking degrees and the public’s perception of the role of higher education. Competitive speech and debate changed from being understood and justified as a public good in the years prior to the Cold War to a private good benefitting the individual student participants.

According to Littlefield, participants from 14 countries in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and North America attended the conference. Topics ranged from reinventing Japanese national character after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis, to renditions of freedom of expression in Julian Assange’s moral argumentation about WikiLeaks.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Grad Student to Present at Engineering and Science Symposium l 9/4/2012

September 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU chemistry graduate student Anoklase Jean-Luc Ayitou has been selected to attend the Building Engineering and Science Talents Symposium Oct. 1-3 in Midland, Mich. Commonly known as BEST, the symposium is part of a program initiated by the DOW Chemical Co. to introduce African American, Hispanic and Native American U.S. doctoral and postdoctoral scientists to the wide range of rewarding careers in industrial research.

Ayitou is scheduled to give a short presentation about his graduate research work. A fifth-year doctoral student in the group of Sivaguru Jayaraman, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, Ayitou’s thesis focuses on using light to synthesize chirally enriched molecular building blocks.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Assistant Professor to Discuss ‘Why Stuff Sticks’ at September Science Café l 9/4/2012

September 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Andrew Croll, assistant professor of physics at NDSU, is scheduled to present the September Science Café, titled “Why Stuff Sticks: Geckos, Bugs, Nanotechnology and the Quest for Really Good Duct Tape,” on Tuesday, Sept. 11, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in Stoker’s Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

The talk will discuss the background behind modern adhesives and then explore the differences in how adhesion is accomplished by natural organisms such as the gecko. Topics will range from fundamental physics to engineering, nanotechnology and biology and will end with a look at the future for the modern gecko – bioinspired adhesives. “Wouldn’t it be great to be Spiderman and climb up a building?” Croll said. “If geckos can do it, why can’t we? The Spiderman effect wows people, but the basic idea is for scientists and engineers to look at the abilities of creatures and be able to scale it up.”

Why things stick has significant practical applications. Not only is there a considerable adhesives industry, but adhesion forms one of the biggest limitations on the design of nanotechnology, which is the science of manipulating materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices. A nanometer is 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.

“In general, nanotechnology means something created by humans, but this is not always the case,” Croll said. “The shiny colors of many insects are natural nanotechnology, as are the structures formed on gecko toes that allow them to stick.”

Stickiness limits nanotechnology design because nano-sized objects almost always stick to each other, Croll said. “Because of this stickiness we can’t just shrink down large things, such as gears, because the physics is different from our everyday large-sized lives.”

Croll said part of the solution to overcoming such issues could be found by mimicking nature. “A nice analogy is that for much of history, mankind was interested in flight,” he said. “We looked at birds and said, ‘they have feathers so, clearly, you need feathers to fly.’ That isn’t quite true – it’s the wing that is important. It’s similar to how we make discoveries in modern adhesives.”

Attendees must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees. For more information on upcoming Science Cafés, which are held monthly, visit http://earth.physics.ndsu.nodak.edu


NDSU Research Connects the Dots to Renewable Energy Future l 8/30/2012

August 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Svetlana Kilina, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $750,000 five-year award from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program. Funding will be used to conduct research outlined in Dr. Kilina’s proposal titled “Modeling of Photoexcited Process at Interfaces of Functionalized Quantum Dots.”

Dr. Kilina’s research occurs at the intersection of renewable energy, high-performance computing, nanotechnology and chemistry. Only 68 awardees were selected from a pool of about 850 university- and national laboratory-based applicants, based on peer review by outside scientific experts.

Quantum dots are nanocrystals discovered by scientists in the 1980s. Ranging in size from two to 10 nanometers, billions of them could fit on the head of a pin. Their tiny sizes belie the Herculean impact they could make in semiconductors and energy. Dr. Kilina’s work centers on new generation solar cells and fuel cells using quantum-dot-based materials.

Materials at the nanoscale level behave differently than at larger scales. Energized quantum dots absorb and emit light. The color of the light depends on the size of the dot. In addition, one quant of light can generate more than two carriers of electric current (two electrons-hole pairs instead of one) in quantum dots. As a result, quantum dots could convert energy to light or vice versa more efficiently than conventional energy materials based on bulk semiconductors such as silicon. That makes quantum dots very promising materials for solar cells and other energy applications.

“One of the main obstacles in the synthesis of quantum dots is the controllable chemistry of the quantum dot surface,” said Dr. Kilina. “Due to their nanosize, the dots are extremely chemically reactive, and different organic molecules from solvent/air environment interact with the surface of the quantum dot during and after synthesis. These molecules cover the surface of the quantum dot like a shell, influencing its optical and electronic properties.”

Dr. Kilina uses supercomputers to conduct computer-simulated experiments, investigate and advance her research in this field. Her goal is to generate theoretical insights to the surface chemistry of quantum dots, which are critical to design efficient quantum-dot-based materials for solar energy conversion and lighting applications.

To apply her model and algorithmic methods, Dr. Kilina’s research group uses supercomputers at the NDSU Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology, in addition to Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory leadership-class, high-performance computing facilities. The combination of NDSU supercomputing and government facilities substantially reduces the amount of time needed for the massive calculations used in this research.

“Dr. Kilina’s research aims to gain fundamental understanding of nanomaterials at the molecular and electronic level,” said Dr. Greg Cook, chair of NDSU’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. “Insights gained from this research will enable the progression of solar energy technology to help solve the world’s energy challenges. The Department of Energy award recognizes Dr. Kilina’s unique expertise in the area of theoretical modeling of these materials critical for the future,” said Cook.

Dr. Kilina’s research addresses fundamental questions of modern materials science that affect the design and manufacture of new-generation energy conversion devices. To design and manufacture such devices requires developing new multi-functional materials with controllable properties. It is anticipated that the acquired theoretical knowledge gained from the research at NDSU will help better explain and interpret experimental data and could facilitate rational design of new nanostructures with desired optical, transport, and light harvesting properties that are fundamental to a myriad of clean energy technologies.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy website, the Office of Science Early Career Research Program awards are designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most formative work. The research awards also aim at providing incentives for scientists to focus on mission research areas that are a high priority for the Department of Energy and the nation. Dr. Kilina’s research is funded by the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, Award No. DE-SC0008446.

Dr. Svetlana Kilina joined the faculty at NDSU in 2010. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M., after receiving her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. She received a master’s degree in physics from Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus.

Dr. Kilina’s research was selected for most recent funding by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the U.S. Department of Energy Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. She previously received research funding from the North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research from 2010 to 2012. For more info regarding Dr. Kilina’s research, visit http://www.ndsu.edu/chemistry/people/faculty/kilina.html

NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution, NDSU is listed in the Top 100 research universities in the U.S. for R&D in computer science, chemistry, and physical, social and agricultural sciences, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. www.ndsu.edu/research


Author Taps into NDSU Professor’s Expertise l 8/24/2012

NDSU communication professor Ann Burnett is serving as an expert source for a Washington Post reporter who is writing a book on the fast pace of life.

Writer Brigid Schulte recently visited Fargo to talk to Burnett about her research on how people talk about their lives in holiday letters and how women think about time. Schulte’s working title is “Overwhelmed. Frenetic families in a chaotic time in search of an elusive moment of peace.” The book will be published by Sarah Crichton Books, an imprint of Farrar Straus Giroux. It is slated to come out fall 2013.

The genesis of Schulte’s book was a 2010 Washington Post magazine story about her own chaotic life as a working mother and a sociologist’s claims that she and other women like her have 30 hours of leisure time a week. What Schulte thought was a very personal story about feeling too busy to do anything well resonated with people from all walks of life, from all over the world.

“They got sucked into a workaholic-worshipping culture and once they found a few hours open on their calendars, they were seized with anxiety because they didn’t know what to ‘do’ with it, they didn’t know how to be ‘productive’ and therefore worthy and valuable,” Schulte wrote in an email. “If so many feel this way and it isn’t mass hysteria, there must be something structural going on; it must be more than just an individual problem with an individual solution.”

To explore why things are this way and how they can be better, Schulte looked at time-use research and the work of sociologists, anthropologists and economists. Then she found Burnett’s communication research through the Work and Family Research Network, a new consortium of academics and researchers who explore how to balance work and family life.

“I was struck by Ann’s use of language, the way we communicate with each other to pass on cultural and social mores,” Schulte wrote in an email. “I was especially fascinated with her analyzing the annual Christmas letter as a window into our modern souls, so to speak, and how they speak volumes for how our busyness has become, almost unconsciously, the new way to Keep Up with the Joneses – a new status symbol for an overloaded, overworked and overwhelmed age.”

Schulte contacted Burnett about her research in spring 2012. When Schulte commented she thought the fast pace of life was an East Coast phenomenon, Burnett offered to set up a Fargo focus group for her. In July, Schulte visited Fargo to follow up on earlier interviews with Burnett and to review the holiday letters Burnett used in her research. She also interviewed a graduate student and former graduate student about their involvement in Burnett’s research. 

As promised, Burnett pulled together a focus group of busy Fargo professionals. She planned for eight participants. Five showed up. “Three got too busy to come,” she said with a smile. This isn’t the first time Burnett’s research has garnered national attention. Her holiday letter research was the subject of a front-page Wall Street Journal story. She has been interviewed by other reporters from across the country.

Burnett is thrilled to share her research for Schulte’s book. “It’s nice to be called by the Washington Post,” Burnett said. “It makes it seem like what I’m doing matters.”

Burnett also is associate dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and director of Women and Gender Studies.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities through the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Pharmacy Research Published l 8/24/2012

August 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several faculty in the NDSU pharmacy practice department recently presented or published papers.

Cynthia Naughton, associate professor, and Dan Friesner, professor, published the article, “Comparison of Pharmacy Students’ Perceived and Actual Knowledge Using the Pharmacy Curricular Outcomes Assessment,” in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.

Andrea Huseth-Zosel, grants coordinator for the Master of Public Health program, published “Front Versus Rear Seat Placement of Children Aged 12 or Younger Within Vehicles: A Rural/Urban Comparison in North Dakota” in Traffic Injury Prevention.

Amy Werremeyer, associate professor, led a round-table presentation on “Patient Medication Education Groups” at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists national meeting in Tampa, Fla., in April.

In addition, Werremeyer and Elizabeth Skoy, assistant professor, had their paper, titled “Medical Mission to Guatemala as an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience,” accepted for publication in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.

Wendy Brown, associate professor, is presenting “Building Bridges from the Foundation: Strengthening Community Connections with Medical Homes,” as part of the Association of Asthma Educators pre-conference workshop, Her topic is “Bringing Specialty Asthma Care to Rural North Dakota: Implementation and Assessment.” It highlights how asthma disease management can be successfully delivered via telepharmacy technology to improve asthma control and meet local institutional asthma health outcomes.

Brown also recently completed a book chapter, titled “Asthma Pharmacotherapy,” which will appear in the Association of Asthma Educator Case Based Monograph. The monograph is intended to serve as a review tool for the Asthma Educator›s Certification examination and a continuing education resource for practicing asthma educators.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Animal Sciences Professor Presents Seminar in Spain l 8/24/2012

August 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Anna Grazul-Bilska, NDSU professor of animal sciences, was invited by Alex Bach, research professor at the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies and head of the Department of Ruminant Production of the Institute of Research in Agriculture and Technology, to present in Barcelona, Spain.  During her  visit in July, Grazul-Bilska interacted with faculty and students and presented a seminar titled “Diet Before and During the Peri-Conceptual Period: Effects on Oocyte Quality and Early Embryonic Development in Sheep.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


Grindberg Departs NDSU Research Park Position for Appareo Systems Opportunity l 8/24/2012

August 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani announced that Tony Grindberg, executive director at the NDSU Research and Technology Park, is resigning effective Sept. 30, and has accepted a position as the Business Unit Manager for the Aerospace Business Unit of Appareo Systems, LLC. Appareo Systems is headquartered in the NDSU Research Park on the NDSU campus. Grindberg has been with the NDSU Research Park for the past 10 years.

“Tony’s leadership in bringing the Research and Technology Park forward has been exceptional. It is a loss for us, but we are pleased he will be joining one of our park’s success story companies,” Bresciani said.

“It has been an honor and privilege serving as the first executive director of the research park," Grindberg said. "The opportunity to contribute to the overall economic growth of the State of North Dakota has been most rewarding.”

In 2009, Grindberg was elected to a prestigious position on the board of directors of the Association of University Research Parks, a professional association that promotes development and operations of research parks that foster innovation, commercialization and economic competitiveness in a global economy. The 16-member board includes research park directors from national leading universities such as University of Wisconsin, University of Maryland, Ohio State University, Purdue and Virginia Tech.

During his tenure the NDSU Research and Technology Park has grown to include seven facilities totaling 370,000 square feet with capital investment of nearly $70 million. In 2010, a study issued by EMSI reported nearly 900 people employed by research park tenants.

In 2007, the NDSU Technology Incubator opened as part of the park to provide value-added services to start-up companies. Bobcat is the anchor tenant in the facility and seven other companies in various stages of development reside in the incubator. Appareo Systems exited the incubator to move into a new multi-tenant facility located southeast of the Technology Incubator.

Appareo Systems, which began as a start-up in NDSU’s Research 1, moved to NDSU Research 2 as it grew, and then moved to the NDSU Technology Incubator prior constructing its own Batcheller Technology Center in the Park. The business began as a custom engineering company specializing in the design and manufacture of high-tech products for the aviation and defense industries, and is now a leading supplier of light aircraft data storage systems and general aviation radio products worldwide. In 2010, Appareo Systems was named to Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 500 list of the fastest growing private companies in the nation. Making the list at No. 159 overall, Appareo was also the No.1 fastest growing engineering firms in the country. 

Bresciani has named Brenda Wyland as interim director, while a search is conducted. Wyland has been with the park since 2008.


NDSU Assistant Professor’s Accounting Manuscript to be Published l 8/24/2012

August 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – David Herda, assistant professor of accounting, had his manuscript, “Auditors’ Relationship with their Accounting Firm and its Effect on Burnout, Turnover Intention and Post-Employment Citizenship,” accepted for publication in Current Issues in Auditing. It is scheduled for publication in December.

Current Issues in Auditing is published by the Auditing Section of the American Accounting Association. It is devoted to advancing the dialogue between academics and practitioners on current issues facing the auditing practice community, such as new opportunities and challenges, emerging areas, global developments, effects of new regulations or pronouncements and effects of technological or market developments on audit processes.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Graduate Student Researches New Use for Wetland Model l 8/24/2012

August 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Twice a week, graduate student Alex Stalboerger parks on the edge of a dirt road near Embden, N.D. He straps on his waders and carries a cooler through a field to the treatment wetland he built last summer.

The cooler isn’t for refreshments. It’s to keep water samples cool until he can test them in the lab at NDSU.

The wetland is designed to treat water for minerals that are common in North Dakota soil and in agricultural run-off. In high concentrations, the minerals can make humans sick and can make fish die. The water samples show how well the wetland is doing its job. Used widely in Europe and by some U.S. industries, the treatment wetland model has not been used much by U.S. farmers. Stalboerger, a master’s student in environmental and conservation science, aims to change that.

Wetlands and water quality
Wetlands are important because they improve water quality, provide fish and wildlife habitats, store floodwater and maintain surface water flow during dry periods. Since the 1600s, however, more than half of U.S. wetlands have been drained for other uses, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

To protect against further losses, the Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation if a wetland is lost to some other use, such as agriculture. The treatment wetland will provide a new method to help North Dakota farmers to meet water quality regulations in a cost-effective way. “We are developing a wetland that a farmer can build onsite as part of the mitigation process,” he says. “But we are designing it in a way where it pays for itself. The costs of water treatment alone will pay for the wetland within a year if they were to be monetized.”

Designed for North Dakota
Treatment wetlands, Stalboerger explains, can be natural or constructed but are always modified to treat specific chemicals, compounds or minerals. The wetland he built is based on research conducted in Ireland by Marinus Otte, professor of biological sciences at NDSU, and one of Stalboerger’s co-advisers.

“The problems in Ireland were excess sulfate in mine drainage water at a major zinc mine and excess phosphate in waste water from a dairy processing plant,” Otte says. “Wetlands are effective in removing both from water and it was one of the areas of research we pursued. In both cases, as here in North Dakota, we constructed wetlands, which were successful in lowering the levels of both pollutants.”

Stalboerger spent this past summer constructing the wetland adapted for North Dakota soil and environment. It is made from 13 tons of cinder block as well as soil and decomposed manure, willows, broadleaf cattail plants, pvc pipe and a 200-gallon basin. This spring he started collecting data to see how the wetland is affecting water quality.

At the wetland, he picks his way through long grass and plants to a basin where drainage from the field collects. He submerges a plastic bottle in the water. Samples from that location give him baseline data about sulfate and phosphate levels before the water goes through the treatment cells. 

The first treatment cell is a sediment pond. The mucky mixture of soil and decomposed manure removes sulfates. Common in North Dakota soil, high levels of sulfates cause digestive problems, such as diarrhea, in humans. The anaerobic process that removes sulfates, however, increases phosphates, Stalboerger explained. Excess phosphates cause algae to grow out of control. And excess algae deplete oxygen in the water, causing fish to die.

The second treatment cell, where the second sample comes from, has deeper water where broadleaf cattails and willows oxygenate the water. The oxygen immobilizes the phosphates, preventing them from entering the creek that flows into the river. Stalboerger said the willows have potential as a biofuel that can be burned for heat or electricity generation. A landowner could either use the energy or sell the biofuel to generate income.

He takes the last two samples from a creek and finally the river. Ultimately, the goal of the research project is to effectively treat water for sulfates and phosphates as well as build the wetland at a low initial cost to the landowner in a way where it pays for itself and has the potential to generate income. “All of these have to be supported through actual data, which is where I come in,” he said.

The wetland research is funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency and North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute.

When Stalboerger graduates, he plans to put his knowledge to work for an environmental consulting firm, a government agency or a private company that specializes in natural water treatment systems. Other NDSU students will continue to use the treatment wetland to conduct field research. Stalboerger’s other co-adviser is Donna Jacob, research assistant professor of biological sciences.

NDSU Faculty Member Receives NSF Funding for Chemistry Research l 8/20/2012

August 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Sivaguru (Siva) Jayaraman, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a three-year, $429,500 award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to conduct research outlined in his proposal titled “Light Induced Enantiospecific Chiral Transfer in Solution.” The funding also provides research opportunities to graduate and undergraduate students to develop environmentally benign, green strategies to perform chemical reactions.

The research program in Dr. Siva’s group focuses on using light to transfer molecular chirality in photochemical reactions (reactions initiated by light) to produce molecules that are chiral (have two non-superimposable mirror images) and make only one of the two possible forms (a single enantiomer). Based on the funding from the National Science Foundation, his research group will study light-induced enantiospecific chiral transfer in solution. One of the research goals is to gain a fundamental understanding of interaction of light with photoreactive substrates, coupled with an intricate control over molecular reactivity, dynamics and non-bonding interactions to enhance stereoselectivity in the photoproducts.

“Synthesizing chiral compounds with high stereoselectivity during light-induced transformations provides an opportunity to develop sustainable strategies with minimal impact on the environment,” said Dr. Jayaraman. “Students learn how modern chemical methods can be used for synthesizing compounds with minimal environmental impact.” With this most recent NSF funding, students involved in the proposed investigations will learn both traditional techniques to characterize and evaluate asymmetric induction during enantiospecific phototransformations and modern spectroscopic methods and characterization techniques to assess excited state reactivity.

The award is a renewal grant of Dr. Jayaraman’s CAREER award, which includes research opportunities for NDSU students. His research also provides opportunities to area high school students through a program called PICNICS (Parents Involvement with Children, Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science).

As part of the PICNICS program, top area high school students conduct a variety of research each summer alongside graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NDSU, Fargo. The PICNICS program was developed by Dr. Jayaraman as an outreach component in his NSF CAREER award to engage high school students and their parents about recent science and technology advancements and to encourage high school juniors and seniors to consider science as a career path.

Dr. Sivaguru (Siva) Jayaraman joined the faculty at NDSU in 2006. He was promoted to associate professor in 2011. He previously received an NSF CAREER award in 2008, a Grammaticakis-Neumann Prize from the Swiss Chemical Society in 2010, a Young-investigator award from the Inter-American Photochemical Society (I-APS) in 2011, and a Young-investigator award from Sigma Xi in 2012.

At NDSU, Dr. Jayaraman received the 2010 Excellence in Research Award, 2011 Excellence in Teaching award and 2012 Peltier Award for Innovation in Teaching. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Columbia University, New York, N.Y., after receiving his Ph.D. from Tulane University, New Orleans, La. He received a master’s degree in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India, and completed a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from St. Joseph’s College, Bharathidasan University, Trichy, India. For more info regarding Dr. Sivaguru Jayaraman’s research, teaching and outreach visit http://sivagroup.chem.ndsu.nodak.edu/

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities with very high research activity by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Equine Science, Mechanical Engineering Partner for Experiential Learning l 8/15/2012

August 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – For the second year, the NDSU Equine Science program partnered with the Department of Mechanical Engineering to offer equine experiential team building and leadership training to students enrolled in the Pre-Engineering Education Collaborative. The collaborative, starting the third year of a five-year program funded by a $4.8 million National Science Foundation Grant, connects NDSU with four North Dakota tribal colleges to prepare and support Native American students who want to pursue an engineering career. The goal is to improve the diversity and education of engineering graduates in the state and to expand the resource on reservations.

This year, 13 individuals participated in the equine-guided training as part of the 12-day summer session at NDSU. Equine-guided experiential learning is based on the premise that human interactions with horses are essentially pure from the horse’s perspective. Horses survive by reading the body language of other animals and consequently offer a very literal mirror of human intention and emotion. After participating in specially designed exercises with the horses, participants process their actions and those of their team. Differences in leadership style as well as concepts of leadership, team building and communication are addressed through post-exercise discussions. Because the insights reaped from expertly guided sessions come out of experiential learning, the retention and impact of those experiences are greatly enhanced.

Bob Pieri, NDSU principal investigator for the grant and professor of mechanical engineering, said “The students and instructors I’ve talked with say that they really saw leadership skills in a different light after the session. The horses have proven to be a great training aid. We are planning on continuing the session in the future.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Receives Grant for New 3-D X-ray Imaging System l 8/15/2012

August 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU has been awarded a $482,807 grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Biological Infrastructure for a versatile state-of-the-art X-ray inspection and computed tomography system. The principal investigator for the Major Research Instrumentation grant is Kendra Greenlee, assistant professor of biological sciences. Co-principal investigators are Scott Payne, assistant director of the Electron Microscopy Center, and Jayma Moore, laboratory manager of the Electron Microscopy Center.

The computed tomography system, also known as a microCT system, will allow thorough external and internal evaluation of intact objects up to about 30 square centimeters and 25 pounds, not otherwise possible without permanent damage. Like computed tomography, or “CAT scanning,” microCT equipment acquires successive X-ray image slices of an object. Once the images are obtained, the microCT software can manipulate them to provide highly detailed information: digital 3-D reconstruction, exterior and interior measurements, density analysis, defect inspection and surface rendering for finite element analysis.

Nondestructive testing has wide-ranging research and commercial applications. With resolution in the sub-micron range, microCT bridges the imaging gap between the resolution of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

Also funded was a lyophilizer, or freeze-dryer, which will be used for preparing biological samples for microCT analysis. Greenlee, a National Science Foundation CAREER scientist, studies the internal gas-exchange system of caterpillars – work for which she currently must travel to Illinois in order to use facilities at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. “Having this equipment here at NDSU will benefit not only my research and that of several other researchers on campus, but this makes NDSU a regional center for others who are interested in analyzing samples with microCT,” Greenlee said. “In addition, this award speaks very highly of Moore and Payne’s vision and dedication to increasing the services and capacity of our Electron Microscopy Center.”

The new microCT system will contribute to comprehensive imaging and analysis services along with the high-resolution analytical transmission electronic microscope obtained through National Science Foundation funding in 2008 and the field-emission scanning electron microscope and cross section polisher supported by the foundation in 2009. In 2006, an analytical scanning electron microscope system was received, involving Electron Microscopy Center personnel in four successful National Science Foundation Major Research Instrumentation proposals within six years.

The microCT unit supplies faculty and students with a new and exciting research tool different from anything now available in the area. Anticipated users of the new instrumentation include partners from other universities and industry as well as NDSU scientists in a range of disciplines from biology and anthropology to engineering and chemistry. Twelve NDSU researchers from seven departments contributed project descriptions to the successful microCT proposal.

Installation of the microCT system, to be housed at the Electron Microscopy Center, is expected in 2013. NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Equine Science, Mechanical Engineering Partner for Experiential Learning l 8/15/2012

August 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – For the second year, the NDSU Equine Science program partnered with the Department of Mechanical Engineering to offer equine experiential team building and leadership training to students enrolled in the Pre-Engineering Education Collaborative. The collaborative, starting the third year of a five-year program funded by a $4.8 million National Science Foundation Grant, connects NDSU with four North Dakota tribal colleges to prepare and support Native American students who want to pursue an engineering career. The goal is to improve the diversity and education of engineering graduates in the state and to expand the resource on reservations.

This year, 13 individuals participated in the equine-guided training as part of the 12-day summer session at NDSU. Equine-guided experiential learning is based on the premise that human interactions with horses are essentially pure from the horse’s perspective. Horses survive by reading the body language of other animals and consequently offer a very literal mirror of human intention and emotion. After participating in specially designed exercises with the horses, participants process their actions and those of their team. Differences in leadership style as well as concepts of leadership, team building and communication are addressed through post-exercise discussions. Because the insights reaped from expertly guided sessions come out of experiential learning, the retention and impact of those experiences are greatly enhanced.

Bob Pieri, NDSU principal investigator for the grant and professor of mechanical engineering, said “The students and instructors I’ve talked with say that they really saw leadership skills in a different light after the session. The horses have proven to be a great training aid. We are planning on continuing the session in the future.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Receives Grant for New 3-D X-ray Imaging System l 8/15/2012

August 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU has been awarded a $482,807 grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Biological Infrastructure for a versatile state-of-the-art X-ray inspection and computed tomography system. The principal investigator for the Major Research Instrumentation grant is Kendra Greenlee, assistant professor of biological sciences. Co-principal investigators are Scott Payne, assistant director of the Electron Microscopy Center, and Jayma Moore, laboratory manager of the Electron Microscopy Center.

The computed tomography system, also known as a microCT system, will allow thorough external and internal evaluation of intact objects up to about 30 square centimeters and 25 pounds, not otherwise possible without permanent damage. Like computed tomography, or “CAT scanning,” microCT equipment acquires successive X-ray image slices of an object. Once the images are obtained, the microCT software can manipulate them to provide highly detailed information: digital 3-D reconstruction, exterior and interior measurements, density analysis, defect inspection and surface rendering for finite element analysis.

Nondestructive testing has wide-ranging research and commercial applications. With resolution in the sub-micron range, microCT bridges the imaging gap between the resolution of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

Also funded was a lyophilizer, or freeze-dryer, which will be used for preparing biological samples for microCT analysis. Greenlee, a National Science Foundation CAREER scientist, studies the internal gas-exchange system of caterpillars – work for which she currently must travel to Illinois in order to use facilities at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. “Having this equipment here at NDSU will benefit not only my research and that of several other researchers on campus, but this makes NDSU a regional center for others who are interested in analyzing samples with microCT,” Greenlee said. “In addition, this award speaks very highly of Moore and Payne’s vision and dedication to increasing the services and capacity of our Electron Microscopy Center.”

The new microCT system will contribute to comprehensive imaging and analysis services along with the high-resolution analytical transmission electronic microscope obtained through National Science Foundation funding in 2008 and the field-emission scanning electron microscope and cross section polisher supported by the foundation in 2009. In 2006, an analytical scanning electron microscope system was received, involving Electron Microscopy Center personnel in four successful National Science Foundation Major Research Instrumentation proposals within six years.

The microCT unit supplies faculty and students with a new and exciting research tool different from anything now available in the area. Anticipated users of the new instrumentation include partners from other universities and industry as well as NDSU scientists in a range of disciplines from biology and anthropology to engineering and chemistry. Twelve NDSU researchers from seven departments contributed project descriptions to the successful microCT proposal.

Installation of the microCT system, to be housed at the Electron Microscopy Center, is expected in 2013. NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

American Indian High School, Tribal College Students Conduct Research with NDSU Faculty l 8/8/2012

August 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – With a closing ceremonial drumming and the handing out of completion certificates, Nurturing American Tribal Undergraduate Research and Education, or NATURE, wrapped up its 12th year on June 15.

Eighteen American Indian students from four tribal colleges and five reservation high schools from North Dakota participated in the two-week program. During the camp, students worked with NDSU and University of North Dakota faculty on research projects in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields.

Goals of the camp are to increase American Indian high school graduation rates and to encourage students to pursue STEM fields in college by tying culture to the sciences. “We’re encouraging students to go to college with this program,” said Bob Pieri, professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and one of the founders of NATURE. “We try to help them figure out what they want to do or study.”

Changing the trend

According to the Department of Education, North Dakota American Indian high school graduation rates have hovered around 60 percent since 2006. Pieri hopes to keep students going through the NATURE program interested in school, especially in math and science courses.

To nurture students’ curiosity, the camp has them pick something they want to learn more about. Then they conduct hands-on research in physics, chemistry, biochemistry, mechanical engineering, computer science, agriculture engineering, food science, geosciences, microbiology or weather and climate for two weeks. The final step is to present their work to NDSU faculty.

The camp focuses on STEM because American Indians are among the groups under-represented in these disciplines. There is a national push to draw people who have diverse backgrounds and perspectives into STEM fields to drive innovation. Experts say these fields are critical for the nation to compete globally. But that doesn’t mean students have to disconnect from their culture and communities, Pieri said.

When he and others started the program, tribal colleges in North Dakota were seeing an outflow of students to larger cities. To find a way to keep students involved in their community after graduating, reinforcing culture became a main concept in NATURE. “We’re tying culture to the sciences in NATURE,” Pieri said. “We’re not trying to change who the students are to get involved in STEM programs. We just want the students to be able to relate the two.”

Katherine Ouellette, who will be a freshman majoring in nursing at Sitting Bull Community College next fall, saw the benefit of the camp. “This program is important because it gets us interested in math and science and prepares us for college-type courses,” she said.

Connecting lab work to the real world

One of the research programs students participated in was looking at drug addictions by examining fish; one that had been exposed to cocaine and one that had not.

“My favorite part of the research was looking at the fish brains under the microscope and being able to see the effects of the drugs from one fish to another,” said Logan Luger, who will be a freshman studying pre-medicine at Sitting Bull College this fall. Other students tested soil compaction and how it affects water transmission to plants or looked at the different metals that pennies are composed of and how it has changed over the years.

Not everyone was in a lab the entire camp though; some students did their research in the kitchen. “My group studied protein in chickpeas and peas as a substitute for eggs in cakes and cookies. What we researched is important because it shows alternatives to people with egg allergens, but it was fun because we got to taste all the food that we made,” said James Henry, who will be transferring from Turtle Mountain Community College to NDSU to study mechanical engineering next year.

Many of the students who participated in the program were recommended by teachers or professors in their high schools, colleges or the Sunday Academy program, where NDSU faculty provide practice in science, math and engineering once a month to the high schools. NATURE is an education outreach program sponsored by North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or ND-EPSCoR. 


NDSU Accounting Faculty, Lecturer Receive Awards, Publish l 8/6/2012

August 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Herb Snyder, professor of accounting; James Clifton, associate professor of accounting practice; and William “Bud” Bowlin, professor of accounting and head of accounting, finance and information systems at NDSU, received first place in the Institute of Management Accountants Inc.’s 2012 Case Writing Competition for their case, “Auditing Alchemy – An Internal Audit Case.”

In addition, Bowlin’s case, “Performance Measurement at Great Persons Inc.: An Application of the Balanced Scorecard,” took third place in the competition.  Both cases will be published in the IMA Educational Case Journal.

Nancy Emerson, accounting lecturer, had her article “Render Unto Caesar What is Caesars: The Importance of Documenting Charitable Contributions,” accepted for publication in The Presbyterian Outlook. The article provides guidance on a recent tax court decision that affects the documentation needed to claim a charitable deduction.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Animal Sciences Group Participates in International Conference l 8/6/2012

August 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Faculty, staff and students from NDSU’s Department of Animal Sciences participated in the 2012 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association/American Society of Animal Science. The event was held July 15-19 in Phoenix.

NDSU faculty, staff and students wrote or co-wrote 17 poster and 21 oral presentations during the meeting. NDSU co-authors had four poster presentations selected for the American Society of Animal Science’s Presidential Picks recognition, which recognizes research that the society’s president and president-elect find particularly innovative.

Erika Berg, associate professor of equine science at NDSU, presented an invited paper, titled “Research in Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies,” in the Horse Species Symposium. Ely Camacho, doctoral student, tied for third place in the Western Section’s Graduate Student Oral Presentation Competition. Students Quynn Larson, Phil Steichen, Christen Jackson and Megan Van Emon also competed in the competition. Nichole Chapel presented her undergraduate research in the American Society of Nutrition/American Society of Animal Science/American Dairy Science Association poster competition. She placed third overall in a competition that included master’s and doctoral students.

David Buchanan, professor of animal sciences and associate dean, was named fellow of the American Society of Animal Science’s teaching category. The awards program noted Buchanan’s teaching career for its diversity, innovation and concern for students. Carrie Hammer, associate professor of equine science, and Chris Schauer, director of the Hettinger Research Extension Center, chaired sessions at the meeting. Kim Vonnahme, associate professor and co-director of the Center for Nutrition and Pregnancy, continues her term on the American Society of Animal Science’s board as a director-at-large and Greg Lardy, professor and head of animal sciences, began his term as president-elect July 18.

Lardy and Larry Reynolds, University Distinguished Professor and co-director of the Center for Nutrition and Pregnancy, were invited speakers in the Western Section American Society of Animal Science’s Graduate Student Lunch and Learn program where they discussed the role of international opportunities for students in animal sciences.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


NDSU Doctoral Students Receive Award at International Biology Congress l 8/6/2012

August 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Heather Bergan and Chad Walock, doctoral students in the cellular and molecular biology program at NDSU, were co-recipients of the Best Poster Award at the 10th International Congress on the Biology of Fish held in Madison, Wis., July 15-19.

Their joint paper, titled “Nutritional state modulates growth hormone-stimulated insulin-like growth factor and hormone sensitive lipase mRNA expression,” was selected for the novelty and significance of the work as well as for its layout and presentation. “This award recognizes both Heather and Chad’s accomplishments and potential, and enhances the stature of NDSU in the scientific community,” said Mark Sheridan, director of the cellular and molecular biology program at NDSU.

The International Congress on the Biology of Fish brings together researchers from around the world to discuss physiological processes, tools and techniques aimed at understanding how fish function, how to manage and protect aquatic resources and how to improve the production of fish for food.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


Research Symposium Showcases High School Students’ Research at NDSU l 8/6/2012

August 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Local top high school students spent the past six weeks conducting college-level chemistry and biochemistry research at NDSU. The Summer Research Symposium in the Molecular Sciences culminated Thursday, Aug. 2,  in the NDSU Memorial when students presented posters on their research. The event was hosted by the NDSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Each summer the department hosts students from area high schools as part of the Parents Involvement with Children, Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science program. Also known as PICNICS, the program informs parents and their children about recent advancements in science andtechnology, and encourages high school juniors and seniors to consider science as a career path. Under the direction of NDSU faculty, students from Fargo North High School, Fargo Davies High School and Northern Cass High School conducted a variety of research alongside graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

One of this year’s students studied the use of light as a reagent to synthesize chemical compounds and develop environmentally benign, green strategies to perform chemical reactions. Another student worked on synthesizing chemicals from biomass to be used to make everyday materials like plastics.

“Students learn how modern chemical methods can be utilized for synthesizing compounds with minimal impact on the environment,” said Sivaguru Jayaraman, NDSU associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry. “All have been top-notch students and essentially carried out research similar to undergraduate students who work in our labs.”

Initiated in 2007 as part of Jayaraman’s National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development program, PICNICS has developed into a summer internship program that typically hosts five or six high school students. They undergo safety training to perform research and learn about the instrumentation used in a laboratory setting. Jayaraman, Mukund Sibi, Gregory Cook, Erika Offerdahl, Svetlana Kilina and Guodong Liu, all NDSU faculty, hosted students in their research groups.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Students Receive Doctoral Dissertation Awards l 8/6/2012

August 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Four NDSU students are recipients of the Doctoral Dissertation Award program through North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. The recipients will receive stipend support ranging from 10 to 24 months and totaling $104,155. Seventeen students competed for the awards.  North Dakota EPSCoR’s Doctoral Dissertation Award program is designed to increase the completion rate of doctoral students enrolled in the science, engineering and mathematics disciplines at North Dakota’s two research-intensive universities; and to increase the number of competitive proposals submitted to the National Science Foundation.

Student recipients, their departments and advisers are: 
• Kumarasamy Elango, chemistry and biochemistry, Sivaguru Jayaraman
• Buddhadev Layek, pharmaceutical science, Jagdish Singh
• Zhongjing Li, chemistry and biochemistry, Wenfang Sun
• Neha Singh, pharmaceutical science, Chengwen Sun

North Dakota EPSCoR is a federally and state funded program designed to help university researchers compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in the sciences, engineering and mathematics.

NDSU Prof Gives Plenary Keynote at Engineering Mechanics Institute Conference l 7/30/2012

July 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Dinesh R. Katti, professor of civil engineering at NDSU , gave an invited plenary keynote lecture, titled “Molecular Interactions Impact the Mechanics of Nanomaterials: A Paradigm Shift in Mechanics,” at the Engineering Mechanics Institute’s international conference June 17-20. The conference was held at the University of Notre Dame.

The Engineering Mechanics Institute represents engineering mechanics worldwide and promotes research and application to address a variety of engineering and societal issues.

In his talk, Katti described “A tale of four nanomaterials,” and that “this is the best of times, with accessibility of high performance computational resources as well as advanced nanoscale instrumentation, enabling the robust incorporation of molecular scale behavior in mechanics.”

Katti described the work of his research group at NDSU on four nanomaterials – nacre (the inner layer of seashells), bone, polymer-clay nanocomposites and swelling clays. The research highlighted that molecular scale phenomena play vital qualitative and quantitative roles across a range of nanomaterial systems that include materials of biological, synthetic and geologic origin.

Katti described the advent of a new era in engineering mechanics that deals with advanced nanomaterials requiring a paradigm shift in the evolution of engineering mechanics as well as a need for a shift in education of the next generation of engineers. The plenary lecture was followed by discussion with panelists Zdenek P. Bazant, professor at Northwestern University and member of the National Academy of Science and National Academy of Engineering, and Christian Hellmich, head of engineering mechanics at Technical University, Vienna, Austria. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.


Undergraduates Gain Experience in Summer Research Program at NDSU l 7/11/2012

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – This year’s NDSU 2012 summer undergraduate research program is under way until mid July. The program’s focus is to give under-represented U.S. students the opportunity to gain valuable research experience with a faculty mentor in one of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics areas. The eight-week experience culminates with poster and oral presentations by the attendees.

Students in the program have the opportunity to work with top-notch faculty mentors on research in their respective fields. Students can learn from a variety of fields, including food systems, plant sciences, mechanical engineering, computer science, biological sciences and pharmaceutical sciences. Students learn research methodology and application, and oral and written communication skills. Making this a well-rounded experience, students also attend presentations on topics like professional development and graduate school by Evie Myers, vice president for equity, diversity and global outreach, and David Wittrock, dean of the Graduate School at NDSU.

The summer research program was initiated in 2009 and gives students from across the country the opportunity to experience NDSU and to learn from NDSU faculty. A total of 55 students have been admitted to the program since it began. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Associate English Professor Publishes Research l 7/11/2012 

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Gary Totten, associate professor of English at NDSU , recently published the article, “ ‘Objects Long Preserved:’ Reading and Writing the Shop Window in Edith Wharton’s ‘Bunner Sisters,’ ” in the Winter 2011 issue of the journal, Studies in American Naturalism. In the article, Totten examines the influence of consumer culture on Wharton’s depiction of female characters.

Totten also presented papers at two recent conferences. He presented “Zitkala-Sa and the Material Cultures of Citizenship” at the American Literature Association conference May 24-27 in San Francisco. At the conference, Totten also chaired two panel sessions and business meetings for the Edith Wharton Society, which he currently serves as president, and the International Theodore Dreiser Society. Totten was named president of the International Theodore Dreiser Society during its business meeting.

Totten attended the “Edith Wharton in Florence” conference in Florence, Italy, June 6-8, where he presented his paper, “The Politics of Affect in Edith Wharton’s Travel Writing.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Assistant Professor Receives Superior Paper Award l 7/11/2012

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers recently selected Ganesh Bora, assistant professor in agricultural and biosystems engineering at NDSU, for the 2012 Superior Paper Award. His paper, titled “Performance of a Pulse Width Modulated Single to Multifold Outlet System for Variable-Rate Anhydrous Ammonia Application,” was published in the journal, Transactions of the ASABE.

The Paper Awards are selected annually from papers of engineering merit published during the prior calendar year in publications of Applied Engineering in Agriculture, Transactions of the ASABE, Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health or Biological Engineering Transactions. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers president, Sonia Jacobsen, will honor paper award recipients during the General Session Recognition Program at the annual international meeting to be held in Dallas July 29-Aug. 1.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Emergency Management Faculty Present at FEMA Conference l 7/11/2012

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Four faculty from the Department of Emergency Management at NDSU gave presentations at the 2012 Federal Emergency Management Agency Higher Education Conference June 3-8 in Emmitsburg, Md. Faculty offered a total of 10 presentations at the conference with an additional presentation by doctoral student Sarah Bundy.

Daniel J. Klenow, head of the emergency management department at NDSU, gave three presentations: “Maintaining and Improving Bachelor’s-Level Emergency Management Programs,” “University Politics – Survival and Success!” and “How Emergency Management Research Builds the Base of the Discipline and Serves the Practitioner Community.” The latter presentation was co-written by George Youngs, professor of emergency management.

Carol Cwiak, assistant professor of emergency management, gave a plenary presentation titled “The State of Higher Education Programs 2012,” and two other presentations titled “Utilizing Curriculum Outcomes to Develop, Evaluate, Enhance and Validate Emergency Management Degree Programs” and “Emergency Management Accreditation Programs: Are Any Right for You?”

Jessica Jensen, assistant professor of emergency management, gave an invited presentation titled “Graduate Study in Emergency Management,” and three additional presentations titled “Confronting Research Issues in Emergency Management,” “Serving Students for Whom Emergency Management is a Career of First Choice,” and “Maximizing the Potential of Emergency Management Higher Education Programs.”

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Animal Sciences Professor Lectures in Germany l 7/11/2012

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Joel Caton, professor in animal sciences at NDSU, traveled to Germany and Madagascar this past spring to provide lectures and expand study programs.

In Berlin, he provided lectures for the “Guest Lecture Series of the Graduate Programme; Hormonal Regulation of Energy Metabolism, Body Weight and Growth.” Caton presented an invited lecture in Germany titled “Impact of Maternal Nutrition and Selenium Supply on Growth, Development and Health Status in Offspring with a Focus on Vascularity of Key Nutrient Transferring Tissues.” He also presented a brief workshop on animal models of developmental programming with an emphasis on maternal nutritional models developed in sheep at NDSU. 

After the invited lecture series in Germany, Caton headed to Madagascar for exploratory efforts toward joint study programs with university students. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Faculty, Students to Participate in Infectious Disease Conference l 7/11/2012

July 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Faculty, administrators and students from NDSU will participate in an international conference to discuss progress on the Capacity Building in Integrated Management of Transboundary Animal Diseases and Zoonoses project in Kampala, Uganda, in mid July.

Margaret Khaitsa, associate professor of veterinary and microbiological sciences at NDSU, serves as U.S. partnership director for the event, which employs the “One World, One Health” integrated health management approach to build human and institutional capacity at Makerere University in Uganda and in higher education institutions in network countries within East and Central Africa.

The meeting will provide a forum for partners in the Africa-U.S. Higher Education Initiative to: review the progress that has resulted from implementation of the first phase of the Capacity Building in Integrated Management of Transboundary Animal Diseases and Zoonoses project; share project findings with stakeholders; meet with other synergistic networks in the region; and finalize the action plan for the remainder of the first phase of the project.

The project is being implemented by NDSU and Makerere University, the lead partnering institutions in collaboration with partnering higher education institutions in the United States and East and Central Africa.

The conference was organized with the support of Higher Education and Development and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Participants will include representatives from partner institutions in the Africa-U.S. Integrated Disease Management Network.

One Smart Egg: Birds Sense Day Length Before Hatching and Change How They Develop l 7/10/2012

July 10, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – This is one smart egg. Talk about adjusting your internal clock.  New research at North Dakota State University, Fargo, shows that some chicks can sense day length, even while they are still in the egg, which in turn, affects how they develop.

Dr. Mark E. Clark, associate professor, and Dr. Wendy Reed, head of biological sciences at NDSU, found in their study that embryos in eggs appear to sense external environments and adjust how they develop. The research is being published in Functional Ecology, a British Ecological Journal, available in early view online.
 
Franklin’s gull is a bird that migrates long distances and requires precise timing.  It winters along the west coast of South America until returning to the prairie wetlands of North America, where it nests in large colonies come springtime.  Clark, Reed and NDSU graduate and undergraduate students conducted field research at J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge and Lake Alice National Wildlife Refuge in north-central North Dakota along the Souris River.
 
The dark hood, gray wings and pink-tinted breast of Franklin’s gulls are a harbinger of spring to the people of the Northern Great Plains, who call it the prairie rose gull.  Soon after large wetlands thaw, Franklin’s gulls arrive to build floating nests from wetland vegetation to hold three green-and-black speckled eggs.
 
Inside these dark eggs, the developing chicks also sense spring days.  “The growing embryos integrate signals from the nutrients provided to eggs by mothers with the amount of daylight,” said Dr. Clark.  “The signals let the chick know whether the egg was laid at the beginning, or at the end of the nesting period.”
 
Clark and Reed note that chicks from eggs produced at the beginning of nesting take longer to hatch, but are larger than chicks from eggs laid at the end of nesting. Contrast that with eggs laid at the end of the nesting period, which hatch in less time, but at a smaller size.

“Chicks hatching later in the season have less time to grow, less time to become independent, and less time for flying lessons before they must migrate to South America in the fall,” said Dr. Reed.
 
According to Dr. Clark, data indicate embryos in late season eggs appear to be sensing external environments and adjusting their development. These changes in development time and size may be important for chicks to successfully migrate.
 
Many birds, including Franklin’s gulls, are arriving earlier on their breeding grounds. “This research suggests that the impacts of changing seasonal signals have far reaching effects on bird biology, including chick development,” said Dr. Clark. Researchers collected early and late season eggs, separating some into component parts and incubating others for short or long photoperiods. Upon hatching, chicks were evaluated for size and yolk sac reserves.
 
As a student, NDSU graduate Nathaniel Cross from Maple Grove, Minn., worked with Franklin’s gulls in the J. Clark Salyer Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. He monitored nests, recording hatch dates and banding chicks. “It was my first time working out in the field, so I had to learn all the ins and outs of data collection and management and the difficulties of conducting research in an uncontrolled situation. I also learned a lot about the behavior of Franklin’s gulls nesting and parenting strategies,” said Cross, who plans to pursue a master’s degree in wildlife biology.
 
Former NDSU graduate students who participated in the research include Shawn Weissenfluh and Emily Davenport-Berg.  “I conducted nest checks and collected eggs during the breeding season,” said Weissenfluh of Princeton, Minn., who noted that birds that initiate nests later in the season are in poorer condition.  Other NDSU students who assisted in the research include Peter Martin, Dan Larsen, Michelle Harviell and Andrew Nygaard, along with Petar Miljkovic of Grinnell College.
 
Results of the study show that hatchling size is sensitive both to egg contents provided by mothers and to photoperiod, and development time increases across the season. When cues of season from eggs are mismatched with cues from photoperiod, alternate phenotypes, which are an organism’s physical or biochemical characteristics, are created.
 
Clark and Reed also found that seasonal variation in egg size, yolk, albumen or shell content of the eggs does not account for the seasonal maternal egg effect on hatchling size. “We expect our results to initiate new studies on how vertebrate embryos integrate environmental cues with maternal effects and offspring responses to optimize the expression of offspring phenotype,” said Clark.
 
Research funding was provided by the National Science Foundation (IOS-0445848), the North Dakota Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
 
North Dakota State University, Fargo, is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology. NDSU is among the top 108 universities in the country with very high research activity, as determined by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
 
A British Ecological Society journal, Functional Ecology publishes high impact papers on organismal ecology, including physiological, behavioural and evolutionary ecology.

Small Kids Discover Big Ideas l 6/29/2012

June 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Dozens upon dozens of elementary school students jammed the lobby of the Fargo Public Library’s James Carlson branch in south Fargo on June 28. They waited to hear not from a sports star, but from a scientist.

More than 60 kids, plus their parents, packed the Community Room of the James Carlson Library to learn about nanoscience. Led by Dr. Kalpana Katti, University Distinguished Professor and professor of civil engineering at North Dakota State University, students were taken on a journey to discover everything from how tall they are in nanometers, to dreaming how they might use nanotechnology in the future.

Holding up a yardstick, Katti asked students how long it measured. “A meter,” came a chorus of replies.

In her presentation, “Nanoscience: It’s Itsy-Bitsier Than Teeny-Tiny!” the third through sixth graders learned that a nanometer can’t been seen without a microscope. “You are going to see what’s the big deal about something so small,” said Katti to her rapt audience.

“I am 1.6 billion nanometers tall,” said the petite Katti, as adults chuckled in the background. Every child had their own opportunity to measure and record their height in nanometers, underscoring how tiny these building blocks of science really are. To understand scale, she told them the length of a piece of chewing gum measures 75,000,000 nanometers. Or they could compare a tiny marble with the size of the planet Earth.

“Scientists understand how things work. Engineers build things. With nanotechnology, you build large objects with these very small nanoparticles and it opens up a whole different way of doing things,” she said.

Professor Katti also wants kids to understand the concept of top down and bottom up.  “Often when we make things, we start big and make small. With nanotechnology, we start with little tiny objects.”

NDSU graduate students Him Upadhyay from Nepal, Avinash Ambre from India and Chunju Gu from China assisted at the event. They are pursuing doctoral degrees in civil engineering and materials and nanotechnology at NDSU.

At the event coordinated by the Fargo Public Library, the younger students occupied the floor and chairs, with standing room only, and a line forming out the door, wondering what they would learn from their college counterparts.

Kids attending the program also received a paper on which they could measure the length of their hands in nanometers. “Do you measure from the thumb or the palm?” asked one girl.

Students received a brief history of nanotechnology too, as Katti mentioned Richard Feynman, considered the father of nanotechnology. “There is a book in this library called, ‘Surely you are joking, Mr. Feynman!’ that I’d encourage you to check out.”

To introduce the concept of fullerenes made of carbon molecules, and buckyballs, which resemble a soccer ball and are composed of hexagons and pentagons with a carbon atom, Katti explained to students that the human body is made mostly of carbon. “What else is made of carbon?”   “Diamonds!” exclaimed one student. “You are a smart kid,” said Katti, encouraging the student, a comment she repeated numerous times to kids at the event.

They also learned about carbon nanotubes, first discovered in soot. Katti explained they could be used to make things that are stronger than steel. “How cool is that? she said, enthusiastically.

Katti pointed out that nanotechnology is used today in products such as sunscreen, medicines, computers, sporting goods and clothing.  But she also encouraged kids to imagine the future of things made of nanoparticles. These could include drugs delivered directly to targeted cells to fight disease, nanopaint on bridges in which paint can indicate if there are structural problems, self cleaning concrete made of nanoparticles, cars that don’t require washing, glass windows on buildings that don’t need to be cleaned, or flexible TV screens on a wall.

“Nanotechnology will change our lives,” said Katti.

She also noted that things in nature such as seashells are examples of how nature uses nanotechnology and by studying nature, scientists learn even more that could lead to such things as engineering bone tissue.

Katti encouraged the potential future scientists and engineers to always ask questions.

“Always ask why. That is the most important question. We need inquisitive minds like yours. It’s not maybe so necessary that you are good in science and math, but that you have excitement about the subject. You need to love it. Good happens later.”

Kids lined up to receive white, cardboard cutouts that they could take home and make into a model of a buckyball. Third grader Andy Tischer from Fargo certainly enjoyed the session. “They had really cool pictures of things under the microscope!”

His mother Maureen said they visited a children’s museum with a nanoscience exhibit and he was hooked on the subject. The blond 8-year-old came bounding out of Dr. Katti’s session. “Mom, that thing that I wanted to be before, a chemist. Now I think I want to be a civil engineer!”

North Dakota State University, Fargo, is among the top 108 universities in the country with very high research activity, as determined by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. NDSU is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Present, Publish l 6/26/2012

June 26, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The BBC interviewed Kevin Miller, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, about his research. He discussed why sodium losses and dehydration might not be the cause of muscle cramping. The interview can be found on the BBC’s website at www.bbc.com/future/story/20120430-are-cramps-due-to-lack-of-salt.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, has co-written two articles with Brandi Niemeier, a former doctoral student who holds a faculty position at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. “Weight-related Health Behaviors and Body Mass: Associations Between Young Adults and Their Parents, Moderated by Parental Authority” will be in the American Journal of Health Education. “Parent Participation in Weight-Related Health Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” also was co-written with Kathy Enger, former School of Education faculty member, and will be in Preventive Medicine.

Lori Quintus of Century High School in Bismarck, N.D.; Stacy Duffield, associate professor; Mari Borr, and Larry Napoleon and Anita Welch, assistant professors in the School of Education; had an article, titled “The Impact of the Cornell Note-Taking Method on Students’ Performance in a High School Family and Consumer Sciences Class,” accepted for publication in the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences Education.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, served as an invited delegate from the United States to the Global Forum on Physical Education Pedagogy held in Velen, Germany, May 9-11. Strand was one of 60 delegates who represented 40 countries. He presented a paper titled “Let’s Move in School – AAHPERD’s Prevention Policy of Active Living in U.S. Schools.”

Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, and John Schuna Jr., wellness doctoral student, along with colleagues in Colorado, had the manuscript “An Objective Assessment of Children’s Physical Activity During the Keep It Moving! After-School Program” accepted into the Journal of School Health. The same group will present the abstract at the upcoming American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

WooMi Jo Phillips and Amelia Asperin, assistant professors of apparel, design and hospitality management, and Kara Wolfe, former NDSU apparel, design and hospitality management faculty and associate professor and hospitality leadership director at Bradley University, will be presenting a paper, titled “Effects of Food Neophobia and Attitude Toward Consuming Unfamiliar Cuisine” at the 2012 Asia Pacific Tourism Association Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, in June.

Abby Gold, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences and Extension, had the article “Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation” accepted for publication in the Journal of Extension.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Agribusiness and Applied Economics Faculty Present at Conferences l 6/26/2012

June 26, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Won Koo, professor and director for the Center for Agricultural Policy and Trade Studies, at NDSU delivered a keynote address at the 13th Annual Conference of International African Academy of Business Development in El Jadida, Morocco, May 16. Koo discussed Africa’s economic development strategy under globalized trade environment. His presentation was focused on economic development policy under a dual economic system in which the economy is divided into agricultural and industrial sectors. Koo emphasized that nations in Africa should focus first on the development of the agricultural sector and then the industrial sector on the basis of the nations’ resource endowments. At the conference, Koo received an outstanding research award for his research on economic development and trade.

Saleem Shaik, assistant professor of agribusiness and applied economics at NDSU, presented two abstracts at the North American Productivity Workshop held at Rice University in Houston June 6-9. His presentations were titled “Alternative Panel Stochastic Models to Evaluate the Importance of Farm Programs/Crop Insurance on Efficiency/Productivity” and “Short/Long-run World Agriculture Efficiency (Technical) Measures.”

The North American Productivity Workshop and its companions, European Workshop on Efficiency and Productivity Analysis and Asia-Pacific Productivity Conference bring together academic scholars and practitioners in the field of productivity and efficiency analysis from all over the world. The workshop includes theoretical and empirical papers on productivity, production theory and efficiency measurement in economics, management science, operations research, public administration and related fields. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Students’ Start-up Business Named a Semifinalist in National Silicon Valley Competition l 6/20/2012

June 20, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The Cleantech Open announced its semifinalists for their internationally-renowned competition, and has announced Fargo’s own start-up business Switch as a semifinalist in the ‘Smart Power, Green Grid and Energy Storage’ category. Teams from around the nation will be traveling to Silicon Valley today to prepare for the world’s largest cleantech accelerator.  The Cleantech Open looks to find, fund and foster entrepreneurs with big ideas that address today's energy, environmental and economic challenges. Fargo-based Switch was created by Jake Joraanstad, a senior from Rolla, N.D., majoring in computer engineering at North Dakota State University.

“We are extremely pleased to be a part of The Cleantech Open,” said Joraanstad. “It’s an honor to have the opportunity to present the benefits of Switch to leaders in the industry.”

Switch, (http://www.switchincorporated.com/) an energy monitoring and automation software with a completely free and open interface, allows users to access and monitor energy consumption at their home or business with their computer or mobile phone.  Switch provides simple yet elegant reporting tools, interactive graphs, social network sharing and integration, scheduling, automation, and intelligent learning capabilities to give the user a clear picture on energy consumption for the past, present, and future.

“Switch is committed to providing energy consumption data and letting the consumer make the decision on how to monitor their energy,” said Joraanstad.  “Everyone’s needs are different, so homes and businesses will have the ability to remotely prioritize and monitor their energy needs according to their schedules.”    

The Switch product team includes Ben Whittier, a senior in electrical engineering at NDSU from Canby, Minn., and Ross Eickhoff, a junior in electrical engineering at NDSU from Canby, Minn. Other contributors to Switch include NDSU graduates Ryan Raguse and James Dravitz.

Wasted electricity can cost billions of dollars each year, with homeowners and businesses seeking energy management tools to control costs.  According to Parks Associates, a market research and consulting firm, “60 percent of U.S. households will have energy management technologies, deployed by utilities, service providers, or retailers, by 2022.”

In addition to this competition, Joraanstad is also a cofounder and manages Myriad Devices, a successful mobile software solutions company providing phone apps to businesses, located in the NDSU Research & Technology Park.

Joraanstad said the Cleantech Open provides an exceptional opportunity for entrepreneurs. After rigorous preparation, feedback from industry leaders and educational seminars later this summer, Switch will present in front of the judging committee and winners will be announced later this fall.  Semifinalist companies compete for regional prizes that include combined cash and in-kind services worth up to $20,000, with regional winners advancing to compete at the national level for a grand prize of up to $250,000 in cash and services, and an overall prize chest of nearly $1 million. 

NDSU Business Faculty Publish Research l 6/18/2012

June 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Fariz Huseynov, assistant professor of finance at NDSU, co-wrote “Government as the Firm’s Third Stakeholder: Impact on Capital Structure, Discount Rates and Valuation.” The manuscript has been accepted for publication in The Engineering Economist, a refereed journal published jointly by the Engineering Economy Division of the American Society of Engineering Education and the Institute of Industrial Engineers. The journal publishes articles, case studies, surveys, book and software reviews, and readers’ comments that represent current research, practice and teaching involving problems of capital investment.

Huseynov also co-wrote a paper with Bonnie Klamm, associate professor of accounting at NDSU, titled “Tax Avoidance, Tax Management and Corporate Social Responsibility.” The paper has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Corporate Finance. The journal publishes theoretical and empirical work related to corporate finance. 

NDSU Communication Student, Faculty Publish Research l 6/18/2012

June 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU Department of Communication doctoral student Laura Farrell and professor Robert Littlefield’s article, “Identifying Communication Strategies in Cases of Domestic Terrorism: Applying Cultural Context to the Fort Hood Shooting,” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The journal is listed on the ISI Master Journal List.

The article investigated the crisis communication strategies revealed through U.S. media during the immediate post-crisis phase of the Nov. 5, 2009, shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. A textual analysis identified situational crisis communication theory strategies employed by different representatives and groups. Cultural context emerged as the key variable in explaining what happened when culturally insensitive policies and procedures were revealed. The case illustrates the importance of incorporating a culturally sensitive approach to homeland security policies, procedures and understanding.

Communication doctoral student Katherine Gronewold, professor Ann Burnett and communication department chair Mark Meister’s article, “Farmers’ Cynicism Toward Nature and Distrust of the Government: Where Does that Leave Conservation Buffer Programs?” has been accepted for publication in the journal, Applied Environmental Education and Communication. The journal is the official publication of the North American Association for Environmental Education and the World Conservation Union Commission on Education and Communication.

NDSU to Host American Society for Microbiology Meeting l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU is scheduled to host the 72nd annual meeting of North Central Branch of the American Society for Microbiology Oct. 12-13.

The organizing committee for the branch includes NDSU faculty in veterinary and microbiological sciences: Birgit M. Pruess, associate professor; Penelope Gibbs, associate professor; Anuradha Vegi, researcher and teacher; Shelley M. Horne, research specialist; and Jerie Little, administrative secretary. A number of student committees also are helping with arrangements for the meeting.

States that contribute to the North Central Branch are North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. About 150 participants from undergraduate to professional levels are expected to attend the meeting. The meeting is an opportunity for NDSU undergraduate and graduate students to present research in the form of oral presentations or posters to an expert audience.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Students Present Research at Renewable Materials Summit l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU mechanical engineering students presented their research during a poster session at the “Renewable Materials Summit: Markets for Building the Biorefinery.” The summit highlighted and explored companies and markets that are driving the emerging bioeconomy.

The one-day event was held May 15 at the Holiday Inn in Fargo. NDSU’s mechanical engineering department was a co-sponsor.

Chad Ulven, associate professor of mechanical engineering at NDSU, organized the poster session to help students share their work with industry leaders and spur networking opportunities. The summit brings together bioeconomy company leaders from the upper Midwest and Canada.

“It is important for students to participate in an event like this to interface with bio-based material industry leaders, so they can make a real impact on the technology moving forward with their own thoughts and ideas,” Ulven said. He also said it is key for students to recognize the major stakeholders in this area. “When they graduate, they will be able to approach those who are riding this bio-wave for employment opportunities.”

The summit was primarily organized by BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota and LifeScience Alley Renewable Materials Summit. For more information on the event, visit http://lifesciencealley.org/programs_events/detail.aspx?id=711.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Human Development and Education Researchers Present, Publish l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Students and faculty in the College of Human Development and Education presented and published papers, spoke at conferences and won awards this past month.

Chris Ray, assistant professor of education at NDSU, presented a paper titled “Development of a Measure of Care Efficacy” at the American Educational Research Association in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was lead author for the paper, which was written with Kevin Fink of Oklahoma City Community College and Dale Fuqua of Oklahoma State University. Ray also was selected for a fellowship in the National Data Institute program, sponsored by the Association for Institutional Research. The competitive program is designed to assist researchers in the utilization of national databases available through the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Education Sciences to inform and improve educational policy.

Joel Hektner, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, also presented a paper at the AERA conference. “Long-term Outcomes of Intervention Promoting Positive Development in High-Risk Children: Early Risers Skills for Success” was co-written with Gerald August from the University of Minnesota.

A national magazine, Fitness, interviewed Julie Garden-Robinson, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, for an article on adapting recipes to be healthier. She will be featured in the magazine either this summer or early fall.

Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor of education at NDSU, was invited to present her Native American Boarding School research, which documents human rights abuses, in front of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on The Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The consultation was held at Sinte Gleska University, Sicangu Lakota Oyate/Rosebud Sioux Tribal Nation, S.D., in May.

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, has the following publication, “Intergenerational Transmission of Gambling: Links Between Young Adult and Perceived Grandparent Gambling Attitudes and Behavior” in the Journal of Gambling Studies.The paper was based on Andrea Lang’s master’s thesis in human development and family science. Data came from the Multigenerational Gambling, Alcohol and Community Experiences Study, which was supported by a National Institutes of Health grant from the Institutional Development Award Network of Biomedical Research Program of the National Center for Research Resources, by the dean of human development and education at NDSU through the Support to Build Research Capability mechanism, and by the Department of Human Development and Family Science.

David Silkenat, assistant professor of history and education at NDSU, received the North Caroliniana Society’s annual book prize for his “Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina.” The award recognizes Silkenat’s book as the volume published in 2011 that “appears to have the best chance of standing the test of time as a classic volume of North Caroliniana.” Another Silkenat article, “Workers in the White City: Working Class Culture at the World’s Columbia Exhibition of 1893,” was selected for the Harry E. Pratt Memorial Award. The honor recognizes the best article published in the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society in 2011.

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of English and education, is co-director of the Red River Valley Writing Project, which is part of the National Writing Project. NWP’s mission is to improve the teaching of writing in kindergarten through 16th grade. Its model of teacher development is a grassroots model: kindergarten through 16th grade teachers in all subject areas attend a four-week summer institute where they refine their best practices for teaching writing, investigate current research on writing instruction and develop workshops for other teachers. Through local in-service and continuity programs, teachers share the knowledge they gain with a wider audience of educators.

Elizabeth Erichsen, assistant professor of education, had an article accepted for publication in the journal, Studies in Higher Education. The article, titled “Student Satisfaction with Graduate Supervision in Doctoral Programs Primarily Delivered in Distance Education Settings” was co-written with Doris Bolliger from the University of Wyoming and Colleen Hallupa from LeTourneau University. Erichsen also received a 2012 NDSU Advance FORWARD Mentor Relationship Travel Award.

WooMi JoPhillips and Amelia Asperin, assistant professors of apparel, design and hospitality management, and Kara Wolfe, associate professor and hospitality leadership director at Bradley University and former NDSU faculty, had a manuscript titled “Investigating the Effect of Country Image and Subjective Knowledge on Attitudes and Behaviors: U.S. Upper Midwesterners' Intentions to Consume Korean Food and Visit Korea" accepted for publication in the International Journal of Hospitality Management.

Wolfe, Asperin and Jo Phillips also had an abstract titled “Validating the Use of a Social Networking Site as a Data Collection Method in Hospitality and Tourism Research” accepted for presentation at the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education Annual Conference in Providence, R.I., in August.

Kevin C. Miller, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was a co-author on a published study investigating skinfold thickness at eight common injury sites. The authors noted that physical activity and gender impacted skinfold thickness, and clinicians should measure skinfold thickness to determine how long ice should be applied following injury. The research was published in the April issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Ann Burnett, professor of women and gender studies; Canan Bilen-Green, professor of industrial engineering; Christi McGeorge, associate professor of human development and family science; and Cali Anicha, human development and education graduate student, had a manuscript published in the Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering. The manuscript is titled “Examining the Complexities of Faculty Attrition: An Analysis of STEM and non-STEM Faculty Who Remain and Faculty Who Leave the Institution.”

Rebecca Woods, assistant professor of human development and family science at NDSU, led two workshops for the Expanding Your Horizons conference in April. The workshop, titled Babies: More than Diapers and Drool, was designed to introduce 7th through 9th grade girls to Woods’ career as a professor and infancy researcher. Expanding Your Horizon conferences are held to inform young girls about careers in science, technology, mathematics, engineering and medicine. Eleven resident assistants helped with the workshop and 20 girls participated.

The Sixth Annual College of Human Development and Education Research Showcase was held in the Memorial Union in April. The showcase included a display of 48 posters in the undergraduate, graduate, faculty and international categories by more than 100 participants. Other activities included a display of college publications, a graduate student research exchange luncheon and faculty development training by Kay Sizer on the new Pivot system.

The awards presented at showcase included the Student’s Choice Award, which is given by the college’s Graduate Student Advisory Council. Scott Allen won for his poster “Ad Libitum Fluid Intake and Plasma Responses Following Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Salin, and Deionized Water Ingestion.” Allen’s poster also won the People’s Choice Award, which was selected by attendees.

The Research Showcase Poster Awards were based on posters reviewed by the College Research Committee. The undergraduate winners were Taylor Heck, Meredith Wagner, Kerrie Hert, Larissa Myers, Jamie Levine and Rhee for Heck’s poster titled “Effects of Nutrition Education and Fruit and Vegetable Supplementation on Macronutrition and Antioxidant Intake in Overweight and Obese Adults.” Honorable mention went to Nicole Seaberg, Sherri Stastny and Garden-Robinson for Seaberg’s poster titled “The Prize is Healthy Eyes: Using Games to Educate About Diabetic Retinopathy.”

The graduate winners were Rebecka Lohse and Rebecca Woods for Lohse’s poster titled “Sound Enhances 10-Month-Olds' Attention to Object Color.” Honorable mention went to Wagner, Hert, Myers, Levine, Heck and Rhee for Wagner’s PowerPoint titled “Effects of Nutrition Education on Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Related to Fruit and Vegetable Intake.” A list of the showcase posters is available at www.ndsu.edu/hde/research/hde_research_showcase/2012_showcase_listing

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU English Professor Delivers Paper at Writing Conference l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Bruce Maylath, professor of English, delivered the paper, “Gateway to a Multilingual World: Managing Complexity in Multilateral International Collaboration” at the Conference on College Composition and Communication in St. Louis, March 21-24. The paper highlighted the cross-cultural virtual teams that match students in NDSU’s English 455/655 International Technical Writing course with students in Belgium, Denmark, Finland and France.

NDSU Emergency Management Faculty Present at Storm Symposium l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Daniel J. Klenow, head of the Department of Emergency Management at NDSU, and D.K. Yoon, assistant professor in the department, presented "Profiling County Tornado Vulnerability in Minnesota and the Great Plains" at the Northern Plains Convective Storm Symposium on May 4 at the University of North Dakota.

The presentation reviewed tornado incidence trends and vulnerability patterns in Minnesota and counties in Great Plains states and drew implications for mitigation planning. 

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Business Faculty to Publish Research l 6/1/2012

June 1, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Rajani Ganesh-Pillai, assistant professor of management and marketing at NDSU, had the manuscript, “Customer Clusters as Sources of Innovation-Based Competitive Advantage,” accepted for publication in the Journal of International Marketing. The article was co-written with with Vishal Bindroo and Babu John Mariadoss.

Derek Lehmberg, assistant professor of management and marketing, co-wrote the paper, “What do we make of Japan: Myths and realities.” It was accepted for publication in Business Horizons, the bimonthly journal of the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

Fulbright Scholar Carries Out Novel Cancer Drug Research at NDSU l 5/22/2012

May 22, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Ihor Tarnavchyk’s brief 2008 visit at NDSU helped lead to a new product used to treat burns. Now the Ukrainian researcher is hoping to use his second stay to develop innovative ways of delivering cancer-fighting drugs within the body. Tarnavchyk is a researcher in the organic chemistry department at Lviv Polytechnic National University in Lviv, Ukraine. In October 2011, he began a nine-month stay at NDSU’s coatings and polymeric materials department through the Fulbright Scholar Program.

Less than 20 Ukrainian scholars study in the United States each year as Fulbright scholars. The program, established in 1946, is funded by the U.S. Department of State and exchanges scholars and students between the United States and foreign countries.

Tarnavchyk is using the opportunity to design, synthesize and study polymeric materials that can be used to form self-organized nano- and microsized carriers for drug delivery. Essentially, Tarnavchyk said he hopes to create hydrogel polymer particles that can carry cancer-fighting drugs through the bloodstream.

While at NDSU, Tarnavchyk has synthesized and studied the hydrogel particles, which have a biodegradable core and biologically compatible shell. The next steps of his research include studying the hydrogel’s ability for drug loading and release, stability and biological degradability. “The main idea is to change the method of drug delivery as it has a significant effect on drug efficacy,” Tarnavchyk said. “Most drugs have an optimum concentration range with highest efficacy, but can be toxic or inefficient above or below this range.”

Ideally, the hydrogel particles would be loaded with cancer-fighting drugs and injected into the body, where they would slowly degrade and release the drugs. This would maximize and extend the drug’s effectiveness to combat cancer cells while potentially alleviating the sickness chemotherapy patients suffer as a side effect.

Tarnavchyk said he is appreciative of the chance to continue his research at NDSU. “During my project here I can easily and thoroughly study any processes,” he said. “For me, as a researcher, it is a very important facility for my research project implementation. What I like is that it is a really user-friendly system. I can use lots of devices at NDSU and get some courses and training if necessary.”

Tarnavchyk also is able to contribute to NDSU research projects. He and members of NDSU’s mechanical engineering department are studying the impact of hydrogel lubricants in the artificial joints used in knee and hip replacements. The joints are built of metal and polymers, which wear and create debris over time. The debris causes inflammation and soft tissue damage currently alleviated through joint maintenance and eventual replacement. “We consider that a few injections of lubricant can protect wearing and avoid debris formation,” Tarnavchyk said.

Another possibility is that hydrogel can be injected into a human joint to provide lubrication, lessen pain and delay replacement. “The goal is to get as close as possible to naturally based lubricants,” said Andriy Voronov, assistant professor of coatings and polymeric materials at NDSU. “We know the principle of what nature uses in the human body to protect against friction. We are trying to mimic that with synthetic materials.”

Voronov, who has been at NDSU since 2007, met Tarnavchyk in Germany while the two were developing a hydrogel-based bandage. The bandage, which affixes medication-containing hydrogels to a polymeric net, is used to treat burn wounds. Tarnavchyk and Voronov obtained a joint Ukrainian patent for their design, which is being manufactured in the Ukraine.

Tarnavchyk developed the hydrogel bandage in part during a 2008 visit to NDSU before returning to the Ukraine to earn a doctorate in polymeric chemistry. “It was a great opportunity to carry out my research in one of the top U.S. research universities,” he said.

NDSU Soil Scientist Receives Grants for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Research l 5/22/2012

May 22, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Amitava Chatterjee, assistant professor of soil science at NDSU, received a $20,000 grant from the North Dakota Corn Council and a $15,000 grant from the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council to help pay for a gas chromatograph that will measure soil greenhouse gas emissions.

Chatterjee is researching how interactions of subsurface drainage and nitrogen fertilizer application affect greenhouse gas emissions from corn, wheat and sugarbeet fields. The automated gas chromatograph, purchased with the help of the grant money, will allow him and other researchers to measure emissions in the test fields all year. Chatterjee’s research will ultimately help farmers determine the right amount of fertilizer for the conditions, which might save money. It also will help farmers be proactive about reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

Students Receive Nearly $175,000 in Research Assistantship Awards l 5/21/2012

May 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research awarded five Graduate Student Research Assistantship awards totaling nearly $175,000 and ranging from 12 to 24 months.

Awardees, alma maters and areas of graduate studies at NDSU are:

  • Christine Gilbertson, Valley City State University, chemistry and biochemistry
  • Jessica Halvorson, Valley City State University, plant pathology
  • Audra Stonefish, Sitting Bull College, entomology
  • Joshua Sweet, Minot State University, computer science
  • Dallas Brown, NDSU and ND EPSCoR NATURE participant, civil engineering


The Graduate Student Research Assistantship awards provide North Dakota University System baccalaureate universities and tribal colleges/NATURE program graduates an opportunity to obtain master’s degrees or doctorates in science, engineering and mathematics at North Dakota’s two large research universities, NDSU and UND.

North Dakota EPSCoR is a federally and state funded program designed to improve the ability of university researchers to compete more effectively for federal, regional and private research grants in the sciences, engineering and mathematics.

For more information on the Graduate Student Research Assistantship awards program, visit www.ndepscor.nodak.edu/programs.

NDSU Associate Professor Receives 2012 Young Investigator Award l 5/21/2012

May 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Sivaguru Jayaraman, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at NDSU, is the recipient of the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society 2012 Young Investigator Award. The prestigious award recognizes excellence in research and alternates yearly between scientists in physical sciences, mathematics and engineering in even numbered years and life and social sciences in odd numbered years.

The award is presented to Jayaraman for his research program that uses light to initiate chemical reactions and control photoreactivity in the excited state using molecular design and nanoconfinement. The Young Investigator Award includes $5,000 and a certificate of recognition.

Gregory Cook, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, nominated Jayaraman. Letters of support from Mukund Sibi, University Distinguished Professor, and Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, also were provided.

Jayaraman joined NDSU faculty in 2006 and in 2011 was promoted to associate professor. Jayaraman was honored with the 2010 Excellence in Research Award and the 2011 Excellence in Teaching award, both from the NDSU College of Science and Mathematics. Most recently, Jayaraman was named winner of the 2012 Peltier Award for Innovation in Teaching.

Founded in 1886, Sigma Xi is the international honor society of research scientists and engineers, with more than 500 chapters at colleges and universities, government laboratories and industry research centers. Membership is by invitation, in recognition of research potential or achievement. Since the society’s inception, more than 200 Sigma Xi members have received the Nobel Prize. In addition to publishing American Scientist, the non-profit society awards hundreds of grants annually to student researchers and sponsors a variety of programs that support science and engineering.

NDSU is recognized as one of the nation's top 108 public and private universities by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.

NDSU Students Present Research at Renewable Materials Summit l 5/21/2012

May 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU mechanical engineering students will present their research during a poster session at the “Renewable Materials Summit: Markets for Building the Biorefinery.” The summit will highlight and explore companies and markets that are driving the emerging bioeconomy.

The one-day event was held May 15 at the Holiday Inn in Fargo. NDSU’s mechanical engineering department is a co-sponsor.

Chad Ulven, associate professor of mechanical engineering at NDSU, organized the poster session to help students share their work with industry leaders and spur networking opportunities. The summit brings together bioeconomy company leaders from the upper Midwest and Canada.

“It is important for students to participate in an event like this to interface with bio-based material industry leaders, so they can make a real impact on the technology moving forward with their own thoughts and ideas,” Ulven said. He also said it is key for students to recognize the major stakeholders in this area. “When they graduate, they will be able to approach those who are riding this bio-wave for employment opportunities.”

The summit is primarily organized by BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota and LifeScience Alley Renewable Materials Summit. For more information on the event, visit http://lifesciencealley.org/programs_events/detail.aspx?id=711.

NDSU is student focused and committed to its land-grant mission.

NDSU History and Education Assistant Professor Wins Research Awards l 5/11/2012

May 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – David Silkenat, assistant professor of historyand education at NDSU, received the North Caroliniana Society’s annual book prize for his “Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina.” The award recognizes Silkenat's book as the volume published in 2011 that "appears to have the best chance of standing the test of time as a classic volume of North Caroliniana."

Another Silkenat article, "Workers in the White City: Working Class Culture at the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893," was selected for the Harry E. Pratt Memorial Award. The honor recognizes the best article published in the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society in 2011.

NDSU is student focused and committed to its land-grant mission.

NDSU Department Head Publishes Work on History, Philosophy, Religious Studies l 5/11/2012

May 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – John K. Cox, professor and head of the history, philosophy and religious studies department, recently published a chapter, titled "A Socio-Cultural Profile of Croatia," in the book, "Balkans: Foreign Affairs, Politics and Socio-Cultures."

He also translated two stories from Bosnian to English, which were included in the 2012 annual volume, titled "Best European Fiction," published by Dalkey Archive Press at the University of Illinois. Cox translated "Sarajevo" and "Magic," written by Muharem Bazdulj.

NDSU is student focused and committed to its land-grant mission.

NDSU Animal Sciences Students Publish Articles on Nutrition and Health l 5/8/2012

May 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Students in the animal sciences course, Lactation Biology Lab at NDSU, recently published two articles related to maternal methyl nutrition and health of offspring. Chung Park, professor of animal sciences, directs the students.

The article, “Lipotropes (methyl nutrients) inhibit growth of feline lymphoma in vitro,” published in Research in Veterinary Science, discusses the most common tumor diagnosed in felines and provides a study on inhibitors of the lymphoma. The second article, “Maternal high methyl diet suppresses mammary carcinogenesis in female rate offspring,” published in Carcinogenesis, investigates the long-term effects of maternal dietary high-dose lipotropes on the development and progression of mammary tumors in rat offspring using two separate experiments.

NDSU is student focused and committed to its land-grant mission.

NDSU Human Development and Education Researchers Publish, Present l 5/8/2012

May 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several faculty members and students from NDSU’s College of Human Development and Education received awards, published research-related articles or gave presentations at conferences. Several students also received awards.

Yeong Rhee, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, will receive the Outstanding Dietetic Educator in a Coordinated Program Award for the Nutrition and Dietetic Educators and Preceptors Area 2. The award, which annually recognizes a dietetics educator with exceptional achievements in dietetics education, will be presented at the NDEP’s Area 2 and Area 5 spring meeting in Indianapolis in mid-April.

Rhee also received the 2012 North Dakota Dietetic Association’s Outstanding Educator Award.

The BBC recently interviewed Kevin Miller, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, for an article on the myth that increasing one’s salt intake can prevent cramping. The article references several of Miller’s research studies The BBC site receives more than 60 million unique users each month.

Anita Welch, Claudette Peterson and Chris Ray, assistant professors of education, and their Turkish colleague Mustafa Cakir conducted a study, titled “A Cross-Cultural Validation of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory in Turkey and the USA,” that will be published in the journal, Research in Science and Technological Education.

Welch presented “Creativity, Communication, Collaboration and Critical Thinking: Building the Four Cs by Building Robots” at the National Science Teachers Association’s 2012 National Conference on Science Education in Indianapolis March 29-April 1. She also was named to the editorial board for The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology.

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, attended the Society for Research on Adolescence conference in early March where she presented research on two different studies. The first presentation was titled “An Under-Represented Group? Prevalence of Research on Rural Adolescents in Empirical Literature.” The second presentation was titled “Teaching About Adolescence: Similarities and Differences Across Disciplines and Audiences.” Randall also presented “Personal Problems Reported by a Sample of Rural Youth and Their Relation to Psychosocial Well-Being” at the Society for Research in Human Development biennial conference in late March.

Randall is slated to present “Factor Structure of the Brief Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol Sale in Adolescents” at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in San Francisco in late June.

Taylor Heck, a junior in the coordinated dietetics program and a McNair scholar, is one of 56 students selected to take part in a 10-week summer internship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences. Heck also received offers from the University of Arizona and the University of Colorado Denver’s Anschutz Medical Campus.

Jared Tucker, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, co-wrote an article, titled “Insulin Resistance Projects Against Gains in Body Fat in Non-Diabetic Women: A Prospective Study,” that was accepted for publication in the journal, Obesity.

Students from Kellie Hamre’s large-scale contract design course competed at the Interior Design Educators Council’s Midwest Regional Student Design Competition. Cassandra Gullickson and Stephanie Hulet, seniors majoring in interior design, received an honorable mention award for their project. Twenty-five entries from 10 programs were judged.

Justin Wageman and Stacy Duffield, associate professors of education, presented their paper, “Examining How Professional Development Impacted Teachers and Students of U.S. History Courses,” at the Association for Teacher Educators’ annual conference in mid-February.

Kim Overton, assistant professor of education at NDSU, and Lisa Staiger, assistant director of field experiences at Minnesota State University Moorhead, presented “Improving Field Experiences Through Collaboration” at the conference.

Duffield and Al Olson, associate professor at Valley City State University, presented a paper, titled “Crossing Borders, Breaking Boundaries: Collaboration Among Higher Education Institutions,” at the American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education conference in mid-February. The presentation described the collaboration efforts on teacher effectiveness initiative work between NDSU, VCSU and MSUM. The collaboration was sponsored by a Bush Foundation grant.

Duffield and Overton presented “Getting to the Heart of the Matter: A Holistic Approach to Teacher Preparation” at the national Professional Development Conference in March. The presentation featured recent initiatives in teacher education, including co-teaching, the Support and Remediation Committee and candidate dispositions.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Communication Researchers’ Work Published l 5/8/2012

May 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Amy O’Connor, associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication at NDSU, and Laura Beauchamp, a former communication graduate student, will have their article, “America’s Most Admired Companies: A Descriptive Analysis of CEO Corporate Social Responsibility Statements,” published in an upcoming issue of Public Relations Review.

The article is based on Beauchamp’s master’s thesis, directed by O’Connor. Beauchamp is a senior account executive for Cause Branding at Cone Communications in Boston.

O’Connor and former NDSU faculty member Michelle Shumate, now an associate professor at the University of Illinois, had their 2010 article (that appeared in Management Communication Quarterly) republished by The Conference Board, which is a global, independent business membership and research association. The edited-for-business-audience publication is titled "The communication patterns of corporate social responsibility within and across industries.”

 NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Chief IT Security Officer Presents at National Conferences l 5/8/2012

May 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Theresa Semmens, NDSU chief information technology security officer, presents at two national conferences this spring on topics related to IT security practices in higher education.

Semmens presented at the Treasury Institute for Higher Education’s Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards workshop on April 24 in Indianapolis.  Semmens facilitated a discussion of the security implications of using smart phones, tablets and other wireless mobile devices for processing financial transactions on campus.

Semmens also will present at the 2012 Security Professionals Conference on May 16 in Indianapolis. Her topic, “Ensuring Electronic Data Records Integrity Through a Simple Audit Process,” will provide attendees with a simple and effective security audit plan they can implement at their home institutions to identify security issues and implement recommendations for departments.

Semmens has served as an IT security officer at NDSU since 2003, and has been a member of the EDUCAUSE Technologies, Operations and Practices Working Group since 2004.

Start-up Company in NDSU Research and Technology Park Receives Top National Award l 5/4/2012

May 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Lift’N Buddy, a start-up company located in the Technology Incubator in North Dakota State University’s Research and Technology Park, has been named a 2012 Gold Edison Award Winner.

The Edison Awards, celebrating 25 years of honoring the best in innovation and excellence in the development of new products and services, announced that Lift’n Buddy was voted a gold winner. At the sold-out April 26th event in New York City, Aaron Lamb joined hundreds of senior executives from some of the world’s most recognized companies to acknowledge the hard work and commitment of all of the 2012 Edison Award winners.  

"It’s an honor to be recognized as a gold winner for the 2012 Edison Awards in the category of Industrial Design,” said Aaron Lamb, president of Ergologistics.

“We are honored to present Lift’n Buddy with an Edison Award as one of the leading innovators of today and tomorrow,” says Thomas Stat, 2012 Edison Awards Steering Committee Chairman.

The ballot of nominees for the Edison Awards™ was judged by a panel of more than 3,000 leading business executives including past award winners, members of the Marketing Executives Networking Group (MENG), academics and leaders in the fields of product development, design, engineering, science and medical. The award honors innovation leaders and business executives who have made a significant and lasting contribution to innovation throughout their careers.

Lift'n Buddy (http://www.liftnbuddy.com) is the revolutionary mobile lifting device that combines the best of a standard two-wheeler's durability and functionality, with automatic lifting and lowering capabilities. The Lift'n Buddy has been designed with proper ergonomics and safety in mind for any person and any moving and lifting job. These mobile lifting devices, fabricated of durable, lightweight, extruded aluminum, help companies avoid the exposure of employee injury, litigation, and workers’ compensation claims.  

Lift'n Buddy is ergonomically safe and environmentally friendly since the electric hand trucks require no oil, gas, hydraulic fluid, or maintenance of any kind. Ergologistics manufactures innovative products for the health and welfare of material handling workers. Lift'n Buddy is designed and distributed by Ergologistics, LLC; manufactured in Fargo, North Dakota.

NDSU Communication Researchers Earn Top Paper Honors at Conference l 5/4/2012

May 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Department of Communication faculty and doctoral students presented their award-winning research at the 81st annual meeting of the Central States Communication Association held March 28-31 in Cleveland. The convention brought together nearly 900 communication faculty, students and practitioners to present their research and conduct business meetings for their respective groups within the association.

Robert S. Littlefield, professor of communication at NDSU, and current doctoral graduate students Kimberly A. Beauchamp, Michael Burns, Laura C. Farrell, Julie L. Fudge and Derek Jorgenson, presented at the annual conference.

Farrell and Fudge presented their manuscript, “An Exploration of Quasi-Stable Online Social Networks: A Longitudinal Perspective,” receiving the Nancy Burrell Award for the Top Student Paper and Top Debut Paper from the Interpersonal and Small Group Communication Interest Group.

Farrell, Littlefield and co-author Stella Opendi Sasanya received the Dan Millar Top Paper Award for their manuscript, “Menu Foods Pet Food Recall: Social Media at the Intersection of Emotion in Crisis,” presented at the Top Papers Panel sponsored by the Public Relations Interest Group.

Burns presented his manuscript as part of the top student papers panel to the Communication Theory Interest Group: “Recruiting Prospective Students with Stories: How Personal Stories Influence the Process of Choosing a University.”

Jorgenson presented his paper, “Sister Wives: A Positive Portrayal of Multiple-Marriages, A Negative Commentary on Polygamist Brides,” as a member of the top panel titled, “One Step Forward, A Thousand Steps Back: The Learning Channel’s World of Women,” sponsored by the Women’s Caucus.

Beauchamp and Littlefield presented their paper, “Communication Infrastructure, Capacity Building, and Development: Uniting Theory and Practice with a Culture-Centered Approach,” on a competitive panel sponsored by the Intercultural Communication Interest Group, titled “’Connecting’ across Culture: Workplace, School and Relational Contexts.”

It was announced at the business meeting that Littlefield was beginning his three-year term as incoming editor of the association’s journal, Communication Studies.

 NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Researchers to Publish Paper in Neuroscience l 5/4/2012

May 4, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Shuang Zhou, a doctoral student in Wu’s lab, co-wrote the article, "Smilagenin Attenuates Beta Amyloid (25-35)-Induced Degeneration of Neuronal Cells via Stimulating the Gene Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor,” which will be published by “Neuroscience.” They collaborated with Yaer Hu lab at Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, for the publication.

According to the authors, the development of drugs that weaken neurodegeneration is important for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. They previously found that smilagenin, a steroidal sapogenin from traditional Chinese medicinal herbs that improves memory in animal models, is neither a cholinesterase inhibitor nor a glutamate receptor antagonist, but can significantly elevate the declined muscarinic receptor (M receptor density). In this paper, to clarify whether smilagenin represents a new approach for treating neurodegeneration disease, they first demonstrate that smilagenin pretreatment significantly attenuates the neurodegenerative changes induced by beta amyloid 25-35 (Aβ25-35) in cultured rat cortical neurons, including decreased cholinergic neuron number, shortened neurite outgrowth length and declined muscarinic receptor density. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the culture medium was also decreased by Aβ25-35 and significantly elevated by smilagenin.

Parallel experiments revealed that when the trk receptors were inhibited by K252a or the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was inhibited by a neutralizing anti- brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody, the effects of smilageninon the Aβ25-35 induced neurodegeneration in rat cortical neurons were almost completely abolished. In the all-trans retinoic acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, the brain-derived neurotrophic factortranscription rate measured by a nuclear run-on assay was significantly suppressed by Aβ25-35 and elevated by SMI, but the brain-derived neurotrophic factor degradation rate measured by half-life determination was unchanged by Aβ25-35 and smilagenin. Transcript analysis of the SH-SY5Y cells using quantitative RT-PCR showed that the IV and VI transcripts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA were significantly decreased by Aβ25-35 and elevated by smilagenin.

“Taken together, this study concludes that smilagenin attenuates Aβ25-35-induced neurodegeneration in cultured rat cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y cells mainly through stimulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA transcription implicating that SMI may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease,” Wu said. “Collaborating with Dr. Hu at Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, we together would like to find better therapeutics and elucidate the mechanisms of the potential novel therapy for Alzheimer’s disease,” Wu said.

Neuroscience publishes papers describing results of original research on any aspect of the scientific study of the nervous system.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Plant Data Provides Goldmine for Climate Change Research Now Featured in Major International Science Journal l 5/2/2012

May 2, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – O.A. Stevens traveled through North Dakota every summer, gathering plants and recording data from 1907 to 1961. One summer alone, the noted botanist, recognized as the world’s leading authority on North Dakota plants, collected 1,000 plant samples from western North Dakota. Over his 67-year career as a professor at what is now North Dakota State University, Stevens fastidiously documented prairie plants. Fast forward to 2012, when Steven Travers, assistant professor of biological sciences at NDSU, and a team of students mined that data. Their efforts are now providing a goldmine of information for climate change research published this week in a major international science journal.

If you’ve noticed that spring seems to be arriving earlier, forcing blooms to burst and leaves to unfurl sooner than expected, these scientists may have found one of the reasons. The research team has shown that experiments underpredict how plants respond to climate change.  The research, which included 22 institutions in the U.S., Canada, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, is being published in an advance online issue of the journal Naturehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11014.

Travers, an evolutionary ecologist at NDSU, along with graduate students Kelsey Dunnell, MS ’10, Horace, N.D.; Elise Maxson, Mauston, Wis.; and NDSU graduate Mathew Cuskelly, BS ’08, Manning, N.D.; are part of the research effort contributing to this worldwide study.

The research team analyzed 50 plant studies on four continents. The notable research results show that the shift in timing of flowering and leafing in plants, due to global warming, appears to be much greater than previously estimated in warming experiments.

“The data suggest that the advances in the start of spring worldwide could be much greater than previously estimated,” said Travers. “We know that plants are shifting the timing of flowering and leafing all over the world in response to climate change, with potentially important ecological effects, but we are basing predictions of how much timing is shifting and what future communities will look like on the outcome of artificial warming experiments over short periods of time,” said Travers.

“Instead, our study found that plants are shifting more dramatically across the globe than predicted by the artificial experiments.  Thus, to better understand the ecological consequences of climate change, we need to establish more long-term observatory networks of plants in the field and improve artificial warming experiments,” said Travers.

These approaches, notes Travers, fit right in with the legacy of research by O.A. Stevens, for whom Stevens Hall is named on the NDSU campus.

These new research findings could have significant implications for predicting global models of future climate change. How plants respond to climate change plays an important role in water supply, crop pollination and ecosystems.

Known as phenology, plant experts study the timing of annual plant events, since they provide very visible and consistent responses to climate change. Ecologists use long-term historical records to track the leafing and flowering of plants. But ecologists often have to also use experiments in field plots to estimate how plants respond to temperature.

The research team created new global databases and then compared how sensitive the plants were to temperature, documenting the degree to which plants shift the timing of leafing and flowering with warming. Calculations were made from experiments and then compared to long-term monitoring records.

For more than two decades, scientists have used warming experiments to extrapolate future climate conditions. The approach rests on a critical but little-tested assumption that plant responses to experimental warming match the long-term responses to global warming. The group of researchers tested that assumption to assess how effective warming experiments are for long-term forecasting and prediction.

Researchers found that experiments underpredicted the plants’ responses to temperature by more than fourfold, when compared with long-term historical records. The group compared 1,634 species based on long-term observations and short-term warming experiments, with research results noted in the paper “Warming experiments underpredict plant phenological responses to climate change.”

IN A NUTSHELL:

The results of this research show that using experiments and historical data may be providing a less than full picture of climate change. Improving the design of warming experiments is expected to be crucial, according to researchers involved in the study.

As it turns out, North Dakota’s normally cold winters provide an ideal research laboratory. “Fargo is a perfect place to study the impact of climate change on plants that have adapted to long, cold winters,” said Travers.

Additional Information:
Lead author Elizabeth Wolkovich at the University of British Columbia led the interdisciplinary team of scientists while she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego, along with assistant professor of biology Elsa Cleland.

The research was conducted as part of the Forecasting Phenology Working Group supported by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (EF-0553768), with additional support from National Science Foundation grants DBI-0905806, IOS-0639794, DEB-0922080 and the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada CREATE Training Program.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Natureis a weekly international journal publishing the finest peer-reviewed research in all fields of science and technology on the basis of its originality, importance, interdisciplinary interest, timeliness, accessibility, elegance and surprising conclusions. Nature is the world’s most highly cited interdisciplinary science journal, according to the 2010 Journal Citation Reports Science Edition (Thomson Reuters, 2011) http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html

North Dakota State University, Fargo, is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology. NDSU is among the top 108 universities in the country with very high research activity, as determined by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. http://www.ndsu.edu/research

*Historical data on O.A. Stevens provided by the Institute for Regional Studies  and University Archives, North Dakota State University Libraries, O.A. Stevens  papers, 1909-1979. The North Dakota State University Herbarium has approximately 250,000 plant collections that date back to the late 1800s.  The Herbarium is an important archive of North Dakota’s, as well as North America’s, natural history. 

Tech Park Company Experiences Record Growth Leading to Headquarters Move I 4/30/2012

Monday, April 30 2012

Late in 2003, a small technology company with two employees moved into NDSU’s Research and Technology Park to start development of a software application that would connect and automate sensor-enabled physical assets.  

Still headquartered out of Fargo, N.D., Pedigree Technologies has become an award-winning machine-to-machine business solutions provider with a national footprint. Since the commercial launch of its OneView application suite in 2009, Pedigree has more than doubled its customer base each year, with a 226% increase in 2011 alone.

From its office in NDSU’s Technology Incubator, the company provides cloud- and tablet-based applications that locate, monitor, and diagnose high-value assets, equipment, and vehicles. This technology allows machines to engage in real-time dialogue with the enterprise and the mobile workforce, improving operations and logistics for more profitable fleet and field service management.

“This kind of rapid growth speaks not only to demand for the technology, but to the quality and innovation coming out of our region,” said Alex Warner, founder and chief executive officer of Pedigree Technologies. To support this growth, the company has added 40% more employees since the commercial launch and is preparing to relocate to its own facility in the Urban Plains area of Fargo. With a satellite office in Sioux Falls and a national sales presence, Pedigree Technologies serves several industries, including oilfield services, heavy and mobile equipment management, transportation and logistics, agriculture, and mechanical services.

“Pedigree’s success and rapid growth is illustrative of the economic stimulation being created at NDSU. They are one of a growing number of North Dakota success stories we are proud of having started here,” said NDSU President Dean Bresciani.

"We congratulate Pedigree Technologies and Alex Warner on all they have achieved during their impressive growth in their initial years at the NDSU Research and Technology Park," said Tony Grindberg, executive director of the Park. "A number of companies such as Pedigree have achieved success after their start-up phase and graduated from the Park. We continue to support start-up businesses that coincide with core research competencies at NDSU."

The company got started with a 2005 trial project using wireless sensors and remote temperature monitoring in sugar beet piles, which introduced the company as an innovator in remote monitoring and machine-to-machine technology. In 2007 Pedigree was awarded a multi-million dollar contract with the U.S. Navy for the implementation of an intelligent wireless operating network. Pedigree Technologies has been recognized on the international M2M Top 100 list from trade publication Connected World for five consecutive years. Most recently, Pedigree Technologies was presented with the Frost & Sullivan 2011 North American New Product Innovation Award in M2M-based Fleet Management Software.

“The company was founded years ago on a philosophy that hasn’t changed,” said Warner. “It’s that web-based software and services can improve operational efficiencies without significant investments in infrastructure or technology resources.”

Locally, Warner was recently announced as a finalist for the Fargo-Moorhead-West Fargo Chamber of Commerce Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Warner attributes the nomination to the success of his employees and looks forward to celebrating the company’s rapid growth in the new facility this June.

“The NDSU Research and Technology Park provides a space that facilitates innovation and community-building among entrepreneurs at early-stage companies, allowing them to focus on the core business in the early years,” Warner said. Pedigree Technologies was located at NDSU’s Research 2 before moving into the Technology Incubator in 2007.

"NDSU’s Research Park and Pedigree have been partners from the beginning, bringing opportunities to the region,” said Dr. Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer. “Our researchers and students continue to work with area companies such as Pedigree, contributing to technology-based economic growth. We congratulate the company on its many successes and look forward to continuing as research partners in the future."

NDSU Receives Competitive Research Award from Navy; Also Receives Federal Funds to Add Laboratory Space I 4/24/2012

April 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A research team at North Dakota State University is receiving $480,000 in a competitive grant award from the Office of Naval Research for research on coatings for ship hulls. Dr. Dean Webster, chair of the department of coatings and polymeric materials at NDSU, will receive a $480,000 award over three years for research titled “Tailoring the Surface Properties of Coatings through Self-Stratification.”

In addition, scientists and engineers at NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering and three Centers of Excellence at NDSU are receiving $1.4 million in sponsored research and competitive grant awards from global companies such as Triton Systems, PPG Industries, Starkey Laboratories and other organizations for research in coatings and microelectronics. Additional federal funds from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, a non-regulatory federal agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce, and Centers of Excellence enhancement funding has been awarded to NDSU to add laboratory space.

The NDSU research funded by the Office of Naval Research supports development of coatings that prevent barnacles and other sea life from attaching to ships. Barnacles slow ships down, resulting in increased fuel cost due to drag and resistance; dry docking to clean ships results in lost time; resistance or drag affects the ability of aircraft carriers to attain speeds needed for jets to launch from shipdecks; and current removal methods are very toxic. Research underway works on solutions to these problems. Think of it as a non-stick coating for ship hulls.

NDSU scientists had previously received such funding through earmark awards for research from Congress. “This new research funding was awarded on a competitive basis, showing the expertise of NDSU researchers in competing for funding with other research enterprises across the country,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer. “Their expertise and scientific proposals merited the awards.”

NDSU is internationally known for its coatings research and Boudjouk says this type of research allows for eventual transfer to commercial market applications. It’s one of the factors leading to adding 35,000 sq. ft. to the Research 1 building located in the Research and Technology Park. This will primarily contain additional laboratories where researchers develop technologies with private companies that can be transferred into the commercial marketplace.

Construction of the additional laboratory space is expected to begin in early May of 2012 and be completed in the third quarter of 2013. The addition is funded through a federal $5 million construction award received from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a $4 million enhancement award from the North Dakota Economic Development Centers of Excellence Program. The COE Commission approved the award in 2009. Additional labs will be connected to the south of the existing Research 1 building.

“This infrastructure is expected to provide a platform to move a larger number and broader spectrum of technologies to market. We expect the net result to be enhanced economic development in the state,” said Boudjouk.  

For example, early technologies being developed from NDSU’s coatings research protect against corrosion (metals), mold (wood, fiberboard), and oxidation (statues, medallions, works of art).  Commercialization of technologies in catalysis, photovoltaics/solar cells, flexible electronics, advanced batteries, and other coatings are also targeted.  

According to a National Science Foundation survey, NDSU ranks nationally in the top 100 research universities in chemistry, physical sciences, social sciences, computer science and agricultural sciences. NDSU is among the top 108 universities in the country with very high research activity, as determined by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. NDSU is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology.

Office of Naval Research funding is provided for the coatings research project through Award No. N000141210482.
National Institute of Standards and Technology funding is provided through Award No. 60NANB10D287.

NDSU Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Core Laboratory Hosts Workshop I 4/24/2012

April 24, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU’s Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Core Lab will host a workshop Friday, April 27, to showcase the latest developments in microscopy and imaging. Robert Burghardt, professor and director of the Image Analysis Lab core at Texas A&M University, College Station, will present two seminars on the development and use of vital analytical cellular imaging and fluorescence probe technologies. The tools provide sensitive approaches to analyze the molecular aspects of cellular function. The time and place for the presentations are yet to be determined.

During his visit, Burghardt will consult with the leadership group of the NDSU Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Core Laboratory on recently acquired high-end microscopes. He also will share his experience working at the Texas A&M University Image Analysis Lab core, where some of the most advanced equipment in microscopy and imaging is used. Established in 1987 to serve the needs of the investigators in the College of Veterinary Medicine, the laboratory was later expanded to serve a broad cross section of the university and researchers outside the university. It is now a facility core for microscopy for various interdisciplinary faculties that involve both faculty and students.

The goal of NDSU’s Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Core Laboratory is to enrich the institution’s research and teaching environment through making available high-end microscopy and imaging equipment that most investigators would not normally be able to afford in their individual research and teaching programs.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment, educating future leaders who will create solutions to national and global challenges that will shape a better world.

NDSU Assistant Professor to Publish Cancer Research I 4/18/2012

April 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, and Fengfei Wang, research associate of pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, "Alterations of TP53 are associated with a poor outcome for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis,” which will be published by European Journal of Cancer.

According to the authors, the prognostic significance of p53 aberration in hepatocellular carcinoma, or cancer of the liver, remains inconclusive. Their analysis aimed to provide comprehensive evidence on the association of p53 alterations with recurrence-free survival and overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. They conducted systematic literature searches up to July 2010. Then they performed meta-analysis to estimate prognostic effects of p53 alterations on patient outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally they conducted the sensitivity and subgroup analyses in the meta-analysis. They found that tumor p53 alterations were associated significantly with poor patient outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

“Hepatocellular carcinoma patients with p53 mutation and upregulated expression in tumor tissue have a shorter overall survival and recurrence-free survival than patients with wild type p53 and low/undetectable p53 expression. However, the prognostic value of serum anti-p53 antibody is required to be further examined,” Wu said. 

The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. “Collaborating with Dr. Ma, we together would like to find better cancer therapeutics and elucidate the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for gastrointestinal cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma,” Wu said.

The European Journal of Cancer is an international oncology journal that publishes original research, editorial comments, review articles and news on basic and preclinical research, clinical oncology (medical, pediatric, radiation, surgical), translational oncology, cancer epidemiology and prevention. 

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment, educating future leaders who will create solutions to national and global challenges.

Lecture at NDSU to Discuss Pervasive Computing in Smart Environments I 4/18/2012

April 18, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Sajal K. Das, a noted wireless mobility and networking researcher, will present “Pervasive Computing and Cyber-Physical Systems: A Perspective From Smart Environments” as part of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering's Distinguished Lecture Series. The lecture is scheduled for Monday, April 23, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Construction Management and Engineering Auditorium and is open to the public

Rapid advancements in smartphones, wireless sensors and mobile communications have led to the development of cyber-physical systems, pervasive computing and smart environments with important applications in environmental, civilian, military, industrial and government sectors. Das’ lecture will focus on the implications of these advancements, including uncertainty-driven unique challenges, opportunities in cyber-physical and pervasive computer systems, and inter-winding relationships with smart environments.

Das is a university distinguished scholar, professor of computer science and engineering and the founding director of the Center for Research in Wireless Mobility and Networking at the University of Texas at Arlington. He previously was program director of the National Science Foundation’s Division of Computer Networks and Systems.

NDSU is a student-focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology.

NDSU Research Provides Clues for Effective Management of Area Lake I 4/16/2012

April 16, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Lakes have lifecycles of their own and results from more than two decades of research by NDSU professor Malcolm Butler and his students are being used to help determine optimum ways to manage and restore a regional lake managed for migratory waterfowl. Lake Christina, located in Douglas County near the town of Ashby in west central Minnesota, has provided decades of living ecological lab experience for students.

Butler, professor of biological sciences at NDSU, is one of 10 co-authors contributing to “A 200-year perspective on alternative stable state theory and lake management from a biomanipulated shallow lake” to be published in the July edition of the Ecological Applications. The article is available online at http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/11-1485.1.

Lake Christina is nationally recognized as a critical staging area for migrating waterfowl, especially canvasback ducks. The lake alternates between cloudy and clear, depending on whether there are aquatic plants known as macrophytes or if there is high phytoplankton density.

NDSU students who worked on Lake Christina over the years worked closely with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Mark Hanson, who received his Ph.D. from NDSU in 1990, is a co-author of the journal article, now working for the Minnesota DNR as a research scientist. Kyle Zimmer, who received his Ph.D. from NDSU in 2001, is also listed as a co-author of the article, working on Lake Christina while a professor at the University of St Thomas.

“NDSU has had a long involvement with Lake Christina, going back to 1985,” said Butler. “At that time, the Minnesota DNR planned a dramatic restoration project on this historic waterfowl lake, by attempting a total eradication of fish.” “The 4000-acre shallow lake had been similarly treated in 1965, with additional treatments in subsequent years.”

As the research published in Ecological Applications describes, repeated treatments had the expected result:  water clarity was restored, plant beds recovered, and waterfowl use increased – but not permanently. To understand what has happened after conditions deteriorate, continuous data, like that provided by Butler and his students, is needed.

The lead authors of the research paper from the Science Museum of Minnesota brought unique expertise as paleolimnologists, studying cores of lake sediments to determine Lake Christina’s historical behavior. The lake is designated as a Wildlife Management Lake and is managed for migratory waterfowl.  Managers walk a fine line, balancing short- and long-term needs, and balancing the interests of ducks and duck hunters at Lake Christina with those of recreational anglers. In the fall of 2012, top-down management will include a series of pumps and pipes installed to draw-down the water level, mimicking the natural winter fish kill.

“The study presents compelling evidence that, in the long run, managers need to focus on strategies that target landscapes, not just the food webs in the lakes themselves – bearing in mind that the short term is also important,” said Mark Hanson, a research scientist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and NDSU graduate. “The people that live here today are very much in this culture of ducks and migratory water birds, and the incredible history around them. When we get all sectors working on lake ecology together, that’s a very productive basis for the future.”

Students at North Dakota State University, in collaboration with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, contributed significant contemporary data to this project from long term monitoring efforts at Lake Christina. Research funding for the project over the years was provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies.

NDSU is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology. http://www.ndsu.edu/research

The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists. The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. http://www.esa.org

NDSU Animal Sciences Representatives Recognized at Midwest Meetings I 4/16/2012

April 16, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several students, faculty and staff from NDSU’s Department of Animal Scienceswere recognized at the Midwest meetings of the American Society of Animal Science/Dairy Science in Des Moines, Iowa, in March.

The NDSU Academic Quadrathlon Team, consisting of Nicole Chapel, Kelsey Phelps, Kara Scherbenske and Jordan Hieber, placed first in the meats section of the lab practicum.

Ellen Nere, Phelps and Mattia Lein competed in the undergraduate oral paper competition. Nere placed first with her paper, “Effects of maternal nutrient restriction and melatonin supplementation on fetal cardiomyocyte maturation and enlargement.” Co- authors were Caleb Lemley, Allison Meyer and Kim Vonnahme.

Sharnae Klein competed in the master’s oral presentation competition.

Phil Steichen placed third in the master’s poster presentation competition with his poster, “Effects of injectable vitamin and selenium on serum vitamin and selenium concentrations and growth performance in beef calves.” Co-authors were Bryan Neville, Klein, R. Stuart and Carl Dahlen.

Jim Magolski placed second in the doctoral poster presentation competition with his poster, “Sow productivity can influence growth rate, efficiency and performance of offspring.” Co-authors were Vonnahme, David Newman and Eric Berg.

NDSU is student focused and committed to its land-grant mission.

NDSU Students Help Researchers Working to Establish New Climate Record for Antarctica I 4/16/2012

April 16, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Some students will literally go to the end of the earth for their studies. Such is the case for NDSU graduate student Felix Zamora and senior Ashley Steffen, who recently journeyed to Antarctica for an unforgettable academic experience. The students accompanied Adam Lewis, assistant professor of geosciences, to the Dry Valleys region of the frigid continent to try to establish a new climate record for that part of the world.

“It was great to learn and work in such a unique, extreme environment,” said Zamora, who is studying for his master’s degree in environmental and conservation sciences.

The Dry Valleys are set within the Transantarctic Mountains located in southern Victoria Land on the western edge of McMurdo Sound. The Dry Valleys, listed among the world’s most arid deserts, are the largest ice-free region in Antarctica.

“Where we were, it almost never gets warm enough to produce melt-water. It snows, but it sublimates before it melts,” Lewis explained, noting the research group took rock and soil samples at elevations about 4,000 feet above the valley floor. “But, there are little channels running down the mountainsides, so once in a while water trickles down and makes a little mud flow. It seems there hasn’t been water in the channels for centuries and they actually have frost cracks going across them. We wanted to more accurately date the channels to know the last time it was warm enough to produce melt water.”

Preliminary dating from previous trips indicates one high-elevation channel most recently carried water about 10,000 years ago. This research effort, with laboratory analysis by Ken Lepper, associate professor of geosciences, hopes to accurately pinpoint the date about a dozen channels were last active, which could indicate a regional warming event.

The expedition was a collaborative effort with Jane Willenbring, an NDSU alumna who is an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Earth and Environmental Science. Funded through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the group was in the field from Nov. 18 to Dec. 22.

The students learned first hand that field research can be difficult. Living in a helicopter-supported tent encampment, using baby wipes to keep clean and having daytime high temperatures near 15 degrees is not usually seen as an enjoyable time. “It was a terrific experience, and it really wasn’t that bad,” said Steffen, who is a native of Bismarck, N.D. “I got to learn how to take samples and conduct research. We tried to stay relaxed and have fun, but at the same time, we had a mission.”

That mission was to collect about 650 pounds of sample material that is being shipped back to campus and will be dated using Lepper’s expertise. The group hopes to have results this summer.

“I get to prepare students for adventure,” said Lewis, who journeyed to Antarctica for the 11th time. “When the helicopter drops us off, I tell them to take a look around. It’s really fun for me to see their mouths drop open and feel their sense of awe.”

The students said it was difficult to put into words how they felt looking across the barren landscape. They knew no other human being had ever set foot in some of the spots they took samples. “Standing at the top the Olympus Range, you get a great view of everything. Off in the distance you see glaciers and icecaps, and at the same time, you see igneous spikes and beautiful sandstone buttes,” said Zamora, who grew up in Brighton, Colo. “There was an overwhelming sense of rugged beauty. I felt so enthusiastic for my course of study.”

Zamora and Steffen both say they would love to go back. “It’s terrific to have the opportunity to go to a place like the Dry Valleys, where very few people get to go,” Steffen said. “It’s nice to participate in geology research first hand, and it makes our studies hit home harder. It was pretty cool.”

NDSU Student Wins National Award for Best Social Science Research I 4/12/2012

April 12, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – An international studies and political science student at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is being awarded first place by the Western Social Science Association (WSSA) for her undergraduate research paper. Sarah Mayo is presenting her research paper at the WSSA 54th Annual Conference in Houston, Texas, April 11-14. At the conference, Mayo will receive her award, which includes a plaque and a $500 cash prize.

Mayo’s research paper titled “The Rhetoric of Terrorism in American Discourse” focuses on the use of language in American English language print media and U.S. government publications. In her research paper, Mayo evaluates the use of the words jihad, madrassa, and Allah in several major American newspapers and government publications from 2000 to 2010, contrasting their meanings within Arabic with the generally intended meanings as used in English writing.

“My research shows that American English-language print media and U.S. government publications, when dealing in topics of terrorism, are saturated with Arabic words that I think are used incorrectly,” said Mayo.  “I argue that the ways in which these particular Arabic words are used very closely mirrors the use of them by al-Qaida ideologues, whose goal it is to pervert their meanings for propaganda purposes.” In her research, Mayo puts forth the premise that continued repetition of terrorists’ rhetoric and propaganda is ineffective in countering terrorism and suggests some possible language alternatives.

Mayo has studied Arabic at NDSU for three years.  In 2009, she received a Critical Language Scholarship awarded by the U.S. State Department to study Arabic for a summer in Alexandria, Egypt.  She stayed in Egypt for a year working as a teacher at an English-immersion primary school. She is the daughter of Bret and Dawn Mayo of Fargo.

Sarah Mayo plans to graduate in May from NDSU and next fall begin pursuing a master’s degree in political science at the American University in Cairo, Egypt.  “My experiences in conducting research, and also working as a teaching assistant last semester to Dr. Jarret Brachman's political science class on the subject of terrorism, have led me to my aspirations of eventually becoming a professor,” said Mayo. Brachman is an internationally recognized counterterrorism expert, currently serving as an associate research fellow at the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute at NDSU.

Mayo’s advisor on the award-winning research paper, Dr. Tom Ambrosio, associate professor in criminal justice and political science at NDSU, said her paper was written as the capstone requirement for her International Studies major. “Sarah’s exploration of the original-language meanings of the terms and the contrast to the current usage was insightful and provided a systematic examination of a topic that everyone knows about (the use of Arabic words in American media), but had not really examined,” said Ambrosio. “Moreover, her time spent in Egypt gave her an appreciation of the use and misuse of language when certain words are taken into another context.”

Tom Isern, University Distinguished Professor of history, philosophy and religious studies at NDSU, said the recognition of Mayo’s research is outstanding. “This is a competitive matter, and the award is prestigious,” said Isern, who serves as President Elect and Program Chair of the Western Social Science Association.

Mayo is currently working on another research project on the topic of Framing Effects in Cross-Language Communication, co-authored with Dr. Kjersten Nelson, assistant professor of political science at NDSU.

NDSU is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology.

The Western Social Science Association (WSSA) advances scholarship, teaching, service and professional exchange across the social science disciplines. The Association’s mission is to foster professional study, to advance research, and to promote the teaching of social science. WSSA draws on scholars and others in some 30 disciplines, from across the United States, Canada, and Mexico; conducts research competitions for faculty and students; and publishes The Social Science Journal, a juried, quarterly research journal, and WSSA News. http://wssa.asu.edu/

NDSU Awarded Funds to Develop Statewide Social Indicators Website I 4/11/2012

April 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU and Wilder Research of St. Paul, Minn., are teaming up to develop North Dakota Compass, a website that will provide users with reliable, objective and uniform social indicators useful in identifying issues that affect North Dakota.

"A basic vision of North Dakota Compass is to promote civic engagement," said Richard Rathge, who is heading the project for NDSU and is a professor in the Departments of Agribusiness and Applied Economics and Sociology and Anthropology. “Thus, residents are encouraged to become an active part of this exciting new venture.”

Rathge urged interested persons to visit the advance website at http://ndcompass.blogspot.com and volunteer to serve on a committee or nominate someone to serve. He asked people to participate in the online polls to indicate which issues should be priorities and offer opinions about the new website.

When the North Dakota Compass website is fully operational, data across a spectrum of issues, such as the economy, aging, youth, health and housing, will be available. In addition, the website will serve as a repository for localized data and research. The North Dakota Compass project is modeled after a similar project in Minnesota that was developed by Wilder Research.

The rollout of North Dakota Compass will occur in three phases. Through March, committees were created to guide the development of the website. By the end of April, committee members will have identified social indicators that will be used in the site. Soon after, the site will go live with theme areas being added in a staged process as they are finalized. Efforts then will be dedicated to working with communities to incorporate locally relevant information. Initial funding for the project came through grants from the Bush Foundation, Otto Bremer Foundation and Dakota Medical Foundation.

"North Dakota communities are facing several challenges and opportunities created by an aging citizenry, out-migration of young people, the oil boom and other similar issues," said Elli Haerter, North and South Dakota manager of activities for the Bush Foundation. "As North Dakotans contemplate how to ensure their future vitality, they recognize the importance of access to accurate and meaningful data. As a result of the NDSU and Wilder partnership, citizens will be able to confidently craft bold and sustainable solutions to their tough problems."

NDSU is a student focused, land-grant, research university – an economic engine that educates students, conducts primary research, creates new knowledge and advances technology.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present I 4/11/2012

April 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Sharon Query, assistant professor of human development and family science and 4-H youth specialist at NDSU, received a $16,065 grant from the North Dakota Governor’s Prevention Advisory Council on Drugs and Alcohol to provide travel stipends and printed material to participants in the April “Power of Parents” training in Bismarck.

Carol Buchholz Holland, assistant professor of counseling; James Korcuska, associate professor of counseling; and Robert C. Nielsen, professor of counseling, presented numerous professional programs at the North Dakota Counseling Association Midwinter Conference in Bismarck. Holland presented “Applications of Solution-Focused Approach in Schools” and “ACE 101: Helpful Tips on How to Apply for the Award of Counseling Excellence.” Korcuska presented “Motivational Interviewing; Preparing Clients for Change,” and Nielsen presented “Stress and the Helping Profession” and “Jeopardy: Round Two Cognitive Theories.” The three jointly presented “NDSU Counselor Education Program Update.”

At the North Dakota Counseling Association Conference in February, Buchholz Holland was selected as president-elect of the North Dakota School Counselor Association and Korcuska was selected as president-elect of the North Dakota Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

The NDSU Couple and Family Therapy program has been nominated for the 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Training Award. The award honors programs for significant contributions to the advancement of the field of marriage and family therapy by encouraging and training for the next generation of marriage and family therapy researchers and practitioners. The nomination was made by Douglas Sprenkle, director of the doctoral program in couple and family therapy at Purdue University. In his nomination, Sprenkle said, "The Couple and Family Therapy program at NDSU has played a leading role in developing training models and practices that are specifically designed to enhance therapists' abilities to provide competent and affirming therapy to culturally diverse and traditionally underserved clients." Ten letters of support were included in the nomination from national leaders in the field.

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science, and Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor of nursing at NDSU, have been awarded $7,000 by the Innovative Small Grants program of the Society for Research on Adolescents. The grant will allow them to travel to Kenya to collect data for their research, which focuses on culturally specific risk and protective factors that influence rural adolescent behaviors and outcomes in the developed and developing world. 

Bryan Christensen, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, was recertified as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

The NDSU physical education and health education programs recently sent 18 undergraduate students to the Central District American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Convention in Colorado Springs, Colo. Students attended a variety of sessions pertaining to curriculum content, career advancement and interview strategies. Jenny Eskew, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, accompanied students.

Christi McGeorge and Tom Carlson, associate professors of human development and family science, and their colleague, Russell Toomey from Arizona State University, had the article, “Establishing the validity of the feminist couple therapy scale: Measuring therapists’ use of feminist practices with heterosexual couples,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy.

Beth Blodgett Salafia, assistant professor of human development and family science, had an article appear in the February issue of the Journal of Child and Family Studies. The article, “Associations between multiple types of stress and disordered eating among girls and boys in middle school,” was co-written by Jessica Lemer, who earned a master’s degree in human development and family science in 2010.

Blodgett Salafia attended the Society for Research on Adolescence conference in early March where she presented research on three different studies. The first presentation is titled “Fathers’ direct and indirect effects on adolescent girls’ and boys’ disordered eating” and is co-written by Amanda Bulat, who earned a master’s degree in human development and family science in 2011. The second presentation is titled “A qualitative analysis of the perceptions of the causes of eating disorders according to individuals with eating disorders” and is co-written by Mallary Schaefer, a 2011 human development and family science master’s degree graduate. The third presentation is titled “Longitudinal connections among parenting, adolescent self-disclosure, maternal knowledge and adolescent depressive symptoms,” and is a collaborative effort with colleagues from the University of Notre Dame.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Animal Sciences Assistant Professor Funded for Cattle-Breeding Research I 4/11/2012

April 11, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Carl Dahlen, assistant professor of animal sciences at NDSU and beef cattle specialist, has been notified his proposal, “Evaluating the Sustainability of Beef Cattle Breeding Systems,” has been selected for funding by North Central Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education. The funding totals nearly $200,000.

As part of the funded project, on-farm research projects will be developed at 10 commercial beef operations throughout North Dakota. The purpose of the project will be to evaluate the production, performance and profit responses of breeding systems that incorporate artificial insemination compared with those that rely only on natural service bull breeding.

Personnel for the NDSU Extension Service, NDSU Departments of Agribusiness and Applied Economics and Sociology and Anthropology, the North Dakota Beef Cattle Improvement Association/Dickinson Research Extension Center and North Dakota Farm Business Management Group are collaborating to make the effort possible. According to its website, the North Central Region includes the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio and Wisconsin. The national grant and education program aims to advance sustainable innovation in American agriculture.

Of the 177 pre-proposals submitted, 23 were requested to develop full proposals. A total of 21 proposals were submitted for review, and nine proposals were selected for funding.  Dahlen’s research interests include applied reproductive physiology, cow-calf and feedlot nutrition and beef cattle management. Dahlen earned his bachelor’s degree in animal and plant systems, master’s degree in ruminant nutrition and reproductive physiology and doctorate in production systems from the University of Minnesota.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Sponsors Noted Evolutionary Biologist to Present on the History of the Human Body I 4/9/2012

April 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Neil Shubin, a noted paleontologist and evolutionary biologist, will present “Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5 Billion-Year History of the Human Body” during the sixth annual NDSU College of Science and Mathematics Community Lectureship. The presentation is scheduled for April 17 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Fargo Theatre and is free and open to the public.

In his research, Shubin, who is a Robert R. Bensley Professor of Organismal Biology and Anatomy and associate dean for Academic Strategy at the University of Chicago, seeks to understand why and how new evolutionary mechanisms arise. One of the three investigators credited for discovering the fossil tetrapodomorph fish Tiktaalik roseae, Shubin has developed expeditionary research programs in the United States, Canada, Africa, Asia and Greenland. His work has led to insights about origins of vertebrates such as mammals, frogs and crocodiles.

“Neil Shubin is an outstanding scientist who addresses ‘big questions,’ such as why we look the way we do and how the human body came to be in its present form after millions of years of evolution. And he answers these questions with fascinating data collected from sites across the world,” said Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at NDSU. “Students and the community will get the opportunity to see and hear a compelling scientific adventure story.”

The purpose of the NDSU College of Science and Mathematics Community Lectureship series is to introduce nationally recognized scientists to the broader community, McCaul said. Through the years, the presenters have explained their science in ways various age groups, from junior high students to older adults engaged in life-long learning, can understand and appreciate.

Nobel Prize Winner to Present Research Lecture at NDSU I 4/5/2012

April 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at NDSU has invited Nobel laureate Dr. Ferid Murad to deliver a research lecture titled “Discovery of Nitric Oxide and Cyclic GMP in Cell Signaling and Their Role in Drug Development” on Thursday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Memorial Union Century Theater. The seminar is open to all persons interested in pharmaceutical and biomedical research.

In 1998, Murad received the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discovery of the role of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system. The discovery not only contributed to a better understanding of how information is transmitted between cells, but also had a significant influence on cardiovascular medicine, leading to changes in treatment following a heart attack. His research and findings on the effect of nitric oxide continue to influence the treatment of cancer, arthritis and other human diseases.

Murad is a professor at George Washington University, Washington, D.C. He was previously at the University of Texas at Houston as director emeritus of the Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Diseases, director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine Center for Cell Signaling, Regent Professor and John S. Dunn Sr. Distinguished Chair in Physiology and Medicine, and director of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Program in Intracellular Signaling. He was on the faculty of Northwestern University and the University of Virginia, where he was director of the Clinical Research Center and director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology. He was chief of medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, chairman of medicine at Stanford University and vice president of research and development at Abbott Laboratories.

Murad is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and its Institute of Medicine, fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and member of the Texas Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science Technology. He earned his bachelor’s degree from DePauw University and doctor of medicine and doctorate from Case Western Reserve University. He completed his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He has received numerous awards and honors in addition to the Nobel Prize, including the Albert and Mary Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, American Heart Association Ciba Award and Baxter Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences from the Association of American Medical Colleges. He has received honorary doctorates from 13 universities.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Student Chapter, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Center of Biopharmaceutical Research and Production, Center for Visual and Cognitive Neuroscience, Center for Protease Research and Office of the Provost.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.

NDSU Graduate Students to Showcase Research and Art Projects I 4/5/2012

Fargo, ND -- 04/05/2012 – The Graduate Student Association will showcase innovative research that is currently in progress at North Dakota State University by hosting the Graduate Research and Arts Forum from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, April 11, in the Memorial Union Plains room.  Sponsored by the Graduate Student Association, the Graduate School and the NDSU Office of the Provost, this event encourages current students to present their graduate research, teaching, outreach and creative projects. Cash awards will be presented at 12:30 p.m. for first, second and third place posters.

“This event gives our students an opportunity to showcase their research and art projects to illustrate the high level of scholarly activity that takes place on our campus,” said David Wittrock, dean of the College of Graduate and Interdisciplinary Studies. More than 70 presentations will feature projects in the following fields:

•    Agribusiness and applied economics
•    Agricultural and biosystems engineering
•    Animal science
•    Architecture
•    Biology
•    Cereal science
•    Chemistry
•    Coatings and polymeric materials
•    Communication
•    Computer science
•    Engineering
•    English
•    Environmental and conservation science
•    Human development
•    Materials and nanotechnology
•    Pharmaceutical science
•    Plant science
•    Sociology

The NDSU Graduate School offers 46 doctoral degree programs, more than 60 master’s degree programs and 10 graduate certificate programs in eight colleges. The NDSU Graduate School has more than 2,200 students and 600 graduate faculty members. NDSU’s research activities exceed $100 million, with NDSU named as a leading research institution, in the Carnegie Commission’s Top 108 universities in the country with very high research activity.

Food Logistics Magazine Selects Lift’n Buddy as a Top 10 Innovator of 2012 I 4/2/2012

Fargo, ND -- 04/02/2012 – Ergologistics, a start-up company at the NDSU Research and Technology Park’s Technology Incubator and creators of the electric hand truck Lift’n Buddy, has been named a Top 10 Innovator of 2012 by Food Logistics Magazine.

Commenting on their annual list of forward thinking companies, editor Lara Sowinski said, “It’s a bold statement to describe your product as the ‘Future of Hand Trucks,’ but Ergologistics, the manufacturer of the Lift’n Buddy, is living up to the claim.”  Lift’n Buddy is a mobile lifting device that combines the best of a standard two-wheeler’s durability and functionality, with automatic lifting and lowering capabilities.

“We’re targeting the manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, supermarkets, and route-based delivery sectors,” says James Dravitz, director of operations. “However, there’s a catch-all ‘miscellaneous’ category that’s also generating a lot of interest in the product. This category is largely made up of the hospitality industry,” says Dravitz, “in particular, hotels, restaurants, and bars—workplaces that are associated with a lot of heavy lifting but that can’t accommodate a larger piece of equipment.”

“Think of the range of employees who work in hotel bars and banquet departments, lifting kegs, boxes of beef, and beverages to refill the vending machine, and you can get an idea of how valuable the Lift’n Buddy is in this setting alone,” said Aaron Lamb, the company’s president and founder.  According to Lamb, the ongoing improvement in worker safety standards, especially in Canada and the EU, and to a lesser extent in the U.S., are helping drive interest in the product, which can reduce worker injuries and a company’s liability.

Ergologistics manufactures innovative products for the health and welfare of material handling workers. Lift’n Buddy is designed and distributed by Ergologistics, LLC; manufactured in Fargo, North Dakota, the company is a proud member of MHIA (Material Handling Industry of America) as well as the National Safety Council.

The Lift’n Buddy has been designed with proper ergonomics and safety in mind for any person and any moving and lifting job. These mobile lifting devices, fabricated of durable, lightweight, extruded aluminum, help companies avoid the financial exposure of employee injury, litigation, and workers’ compensation claims.

The NDSU Research and Technology Park and Technology Incubator are home to fast-paced, high-growth companies that promote technology-based economic development in North Dakota. Each of them has the potential to compete globally or is already doing so effectively. To operate within the park or Technology Incubator, a company must be involved in the advancement and development of new technology, be willing to establish a working relationship with NDSU and work in one or more of the following technology fields: material sciences, biosciences and life science technology, information technology, nanotechnology, advanced manufacturing and sensors/micro-electronics.

NDSU April Science Café to Explore the Biology of Bats I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erin Gillam, assistant professor of biological sciences at NDSU, is scheduled to present the April Science Cafe, titled “Beauty and the Bat; Tales From Life’s Only Flying Mammal,” on Tuesday, April 10, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

The talk will focus on a variety of topics related to the biology of bats, including common myths (bats don’t actually fly into your hair, but vampire bats are real), and information about types of food eaten and habitats used by bat species around the world. She’ll also share little-known tidbits such as certain bats live primarily in spider webs and some male bats produce complex mating songs to attract females.

“When many people think of bats, the first things to come to mind are images of Dracula and other scary creatures of the night. Despite the generally bad reputation of bats, these fascinating animals are an important part of many ecosystems and exhibit a wide variety of interesting behaviors,” Gillam said.

Gillam also will share research being conducted at NDSU on local bat populations in North Dakota, as well as White-Nose Syndrome, an emerging infectious disease that poses the biggest threat to North American bats in recorded history. 

Attendees must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees.

NDSU Community Lecture to Explore History of the Human Body I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Neil Shubin, a noted paleontologist and evolutionary biologist, will present “Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5 Billion-Year History of the Human Body” during the sixth annual NDSU College of Science and Mathematics Community Lectureship. The presentation is scheduled for April 17 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Fargo Theatre and is free and open to the public.

In his research, Shubin seeks to understand why and how new evolutionary mechanisms arise. One of the three investigators credited for discovering the fossil tetrapodomorph fish Tiktaalik roseae, Shubin has developed expeditionary research programs in the United States, Canada, Africa, Asia and Greenland. His work has led to insights about origins of vertebrates such as mammals, frogs and crocodiles.

Shubin is a Robert R. Bensley Professor of Organismal Biology and Anatomy and associate dean for Academic Strategy at the University of Chicago.

NDSU Computer Science Professor Gives Keynote Address I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kendall E. Nygard, professor of computer science and operations research at NDSU, delivered an invited keynote address at the InfoSys 2012 conference on March 25-30 in St. Maarten, Netherlands, Antilles. The conference is an annual series of four co-located conferences, including The International Conference on Networking and Services, The International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems, The International Conference of Resource Intensive Applications and Services, and The International Conference on Smart Grids, Green Communications and IT Energy-aware Technologies.

The InfoSys Conference is sponsored by the International Academy, Research and Industry Association. Nygard’s keynote address is titled “Research Directions in Sensor Networks.” Nygard also presented the session paper, “Decision Support Independence in a Smart Grid.” The paper was co-written by NDSU graduate students Steve Bou Ghosn, Prakash Ranganathan, Md. Minhaz Chowdhury, Ryan McCulloch, Md. M. Khan, Anand Panday and NDSU undergraduate student Davin Loegering.

NDSU Business Faculty Receive Best Paper Award I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Two NDSU College of Business faculty members, Michael Krush, assistant professor of marketing, and Sukumarakurup Krishnakumar, assistant professor of management, were awarded the Tanner, Honeycutt and Erffmeyer/Prentice Hall Best Paper Award at the 2012 National Conference in Sales Management March 14-17 in Indianapolis. The award recognizes the top manuscript in terms of quality and relevance.

The paper, “The Salesperson’s Ability to Bounce Back: Examining the Influence of Salesperson’s Resiliency on Job Attitudes, Behaviors, and Performance,” was co-written with Raj Agnihotri of William Paterson University and Kevin J. Trainor of Northern Arizona University. It focuses on the influence of emotional regulation on salespeople’s job-related behaviors and performance. One form of emotional regulation lies in the salesperson’s level of resiliency. Resiliency is relevant in a sales setting because salespeople are consistently exposed to ever-changing environments and frequently face the potential for failure due to the nature of their jobs. The scholars proposed and tested a model of salesperson resiliency and its direct impact on a salesperson’s job-related variables and indirectly on sales performance. The study findings support that resiliency provides a salesperson with a sense of personal buoyancy that supports two pathways – amplifying motivation control and adaptive selling, and reducing stress and anxiety.

The National Conference in Sales Management is an international gathering of scholars, instructors and practitioners designed to develop and distribute knowledge regarding personal selling and sales management teaching and research.

NDSU Researchers Present at Transportation Forum I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several NDSU students, researchers and faculty presented research at the annual Transportation Research Forum March 15-17 in Tampa, Fla. The forum is an independent organization of transportation professionals, academics and practitioners. Each spring, it brings together transportation professionals to participate in research presentations, plenary panels and discussions.

Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute researchers Pan Lu and Denver Tolliver presented “Modeling Pavement Performance and Preservation.” The presentation covered complex decisions highway agencies must make about maintaining, repairing and renewing existing pavements in the most cost-effective ways. The researchers indicated that decision makers need to learn to what degrees different pavement preservation treatments will improve a pavement condition, how pavement conditions will change over time, when to apply which treatment to what section and what budget level will be needed to maintain and improve pavement conditions.

Sumadhur Shakya, transportation and logistics student at NDSU; William Wilson, NDSU professor of agribusiness and applied economics; and researcher Bruce Dahl presented “Pulsating Market Boundaries and Spatial Arbitrage in the U.S. Gulf.” Their study focused on pulsating market boundaries due to spatial arbitrage of corn grown in the United States to Japan and Asia, with special emphasis on Panama-Canal expansion. The presentation discussed the role of the capacity expansion of the Panama Canal and its effect on the corn market boundary in the Midwest regions.

EunSu Lee, a researcher in the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, presented “Impetus to Short Sea Shipping Lines through Marine Highways.” The presentation explored the feasibility of the combination of inland transportation and marine highways to handle increasing import and export activities through U.S. water transportation networks.

NDSU transportation and logistics student Christopher DeHaan and Tolliver presented “Transporting Water for Hydraulic Fracturing.” The study of the oil drilling in North Dakota’s Bakken formation analyzed the importance of water transportation for oil development. In the session, the audience had the opportunity to debate environmental and energy issues related to oil. The forum also included a graduate symposium aimed at helping students understand potential career opportunities with discussion from academic, industry and government officials. The event was coordinated by David Ripplinger, a researcher in NDSU’s agribusiness and applied economics department. “It was a great way to learn of the possibilities and expectations of each sector,” DeHaan said.

NDSU Dean Participates in Midwest Sociological Society Meetings I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kent Sandstrom, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at NDSU, gave a presentation at the Midwest Sociological Society meetings in Minneapolis, March 29-April 1. Sandstrom participated in an “Author Meets Critics” session, which included five other sociological theorists. Their discussion includes the book, “Closure: The Rush To End Grief and What It Costs Us,” and offers critiques and questions to author Nancy Berns.

The Midwest Sociological Society is the largest regional association of sociologists in the United States. The society is a nonprofit, professional organization dedicated to building community among sociologists and to advancing sociological knowledge, teaching and practice for social scientific purposes and social betterment.

NDSU Professor Publishes Article Online I 3/30/2012

March 30, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – William Slanger, professor and director of institutional research and analysis at NDSU, has published the article,“The Staying Ability of the College Student Inventory,” in the March issue of Retention Success online journal. The publication is the online journal of the Noel Levitz Retention Management System/College Student Inventory Community of Educators.

Slanger studied five years of data, including collection details from fall 2002, summer orientation, fall 2003, students enrolled in the mandatory freshmen orientation one-credit course, and followed by students enrolled in selected academic colleges from fall 2004 through 2006. Slanger wrote the College Student Inventory is “an exquisite instrument” that was “equally predictive of cumulative grade point average and academic capacity for each semester.” He also concluded the inventory was performed well for predicting retention.

The article is available for viewing by Noel-Levitz clients only at www.noellevitz.com/mynoellevitz/clientcommunities/retention-management-system-plus/log-in.

Emergency Management Faculty Present at Conference I 3/27/2012

Jessica Jensen, assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Management at NDSU, gave a presentation Feb. 15 at the 47th annual Governor's Homeland Security and Emergency Management Conference in St. Paul, Minn. Jensen's presentation, titled “How Big, How Bad: Measuring Return on Investment for Emergency Management Performance Grant,” discussed efforts under way to develop a system that would measure return on investment for all Department of Homeland Security preparedness grants and challenges associated with designing a measurement system that would be simple, relevant and valued by jurisdictions participating in preparedness grant programs.

Daniel J. Klenow, department head, and Dong Keun Yoon, assistant professor of emergency management at NDSU, also gave a presentation at the conference. Their presentation, titled "Profiling County Tornado Vulnerability in Minnesota,” reviewed tornado incidence trends and vulnerability patterns in Minnesota counties and drew implications for mitigation planning.

NDSU Graduate Research Event Scheduled I 3/27/2012

The third annual NDSU Graduate Research and Arts Forum is scheduled for Wednesday, April 11, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union Plains room. The NDSU Graduate Student Association hosts the event to showcase graduate student contributions to the university and beyond.

Provost Bruce Rafert will give opening remarks at 10 a.m. followed by the poster session. Refreshments will be provided throughout. Rafert will present awards at 12:30 p.m. for first, second and third place to the student and their adviser. He has sponsored $500, $250 and $100 for the awards.

“Sugar on a stick” Helps Kids Learn to Learn:  Event Set for Tuesday at Madison School in Fargo I 3/26/2012

March 26, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Many children are exposed to technology at an early age, but few are taught how to harness the power of technology to drive their own learning and their future. A group of students from North Dakota State University and their advisor, Dr. Kevin Brooks, chair of the English department, are working to change that. On Tuesday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m., a dozen students at Madison School in Fargo, will show what they’ve learned from a program called “Sugar” as part of the school’s Tech Team. They’ll pass on their knowledge to 25 fourth graders as part of Sugar Day on Tuesday.

Dr. Brooks and a team of NDSU students have worked with Tech Team students at Madison School for the past 14 weeks, using a free, open-source software platform called Sugar, which contains software applications that allow kids to explore math, language arts, science, social science and computer programming. For an hour after school each week, NDSU students and elementary school students used the program for activities that included:  studying geometry with a software program called Turtle Art; building a Rube Goldberg machine with a program called Physics; and learning about computer programming using a program called Etoys. The NDSU group’s program is funded by a Community Project grant from the Office of the President at NDSU.

At Tuesday’s event at Madison School, fourth graders will be introduced to Sugar by students on Madison’s Tech Team, and then be taught to use the physics tools, pass a fulcrum challenge by balancing objects on a beam, build a conveyor belt or pulley, and put all the pieces together into a Goldberg Machine. Students will then receive “Sugar on a stick,” which is a computer flash drive loaded with 20 activities, including music software, a typing tutor and puzzle games.

“They are learning how to learn. We essentially present them with a challenge or problem, and they have to solve it.  We might be laying the foundation for a career in a technical field such as computer programming, management information systems or technical support,” said Brooks, “but we also want to make sure they have fun learning and solving problems.”

Not only are the elementary school students learning from this unique program, so are the NDSU students. The program provides NDSU students with research opportunities in teaching, technical communication, and computer science. The project team includes graduate students pursuing their master’s degrees in English:  Chris Lindgren, originally from Halstad, Minn., who serves as project manager; Jade Sandbulte from Edgerton, Minn.; Emily Bartz of South Africa; David Lemke, from Morris, Minn.; Matt Warner from Fargo and Davin Loegering, a senior from Erie, N.D., studying computer science.

The NDSU students say working with such a program provides many rewards. “We learned mainly how hard, yet rewarding, a literacy initiative like this one is for the community and students,” said grad student Chris Lindgren, who serves as project manager. “If we can also share our research findings, as we serve the community, I think we can tease apart how important it is to help the younger generations to become smarter users of computer technology.”

“We have seen kids persist through difficult challenges,” said Professor Brooks. “They will shout out, ‘This is too hard,’ when trying to make a shape in Turtle Art, but then they will pair up and solve the problem.” The group has also seen a glimpse of the social dynamics that can plague technical fields.  “Teachers and parents need to understand the social dynamics that lead to over and under-representations in certain career fields start as early as 4th and 5th grade.”

Brooks says they are distributing “Sugar” to Fargo elementary schools, beginning with Madison School. “This event on Tuesday is a chance for the Tech Team to share their knowledge with a wider segment of the school.  We hope this event will interest the 4th graders to participate in Tech Team next year.  We (Sugar Labs @ NDSU) will be going to Jefferson Elementary for a four-week project in April and hope to be able to host similar events that will be open to the public.”

"Sugar” is an extension of the One Laptop per Child program that provides underprivileged children from across the world with affordable laptops and free educational software. http://sugarlabs.org

 

NDSU Animal Sciences Assistant Professor Publishes Paper on Meat Science I 3/21/2012

March 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kasey Maddock Carlin, assistant professor in animal science at NDSU, had her paper, “Meat science and muscle biology symposium: Extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle development and meat quality,” recently published in the Journal of Animal Science. In her article, Carlin identifies cells relating to muscle growth and how it relates to the meat production industry. She also discusses the importance of quality and quantity of meat production in accordance with consumers. Articles published in Journal of Animal Science encompass a broad range of research topics in animal production and fundamental aspects of genetics, nutrition, physiology, and preparation and utilization of animal products. It is considered the premier journal for animal science and serves as a leading source of new knowledge and perspective in the Midwest.

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes in Transcultural Nursing Journal I 3/21/2012

March 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Donna Grandbois, assistant professor of nursing at NDSU, and Gregory Sanders, associate dean for the College of Human Development and Education, had their manuscript, “Resilience and stereotyping: The experience of Native American Elders,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Transcultural Nursing. It is expected to appear in the October 2012 issue, and will likely be available online sooner.

Grandbois also has been invited to be part of the Journal of Transcultural Nursing’s Panel of Peer Reviewers. She was recommended as an expert qualitative reviewer by senior editor Joyceen Boyle, co-author of the textbook, “Transcultural Concepts in Nursing Care.” Additionally, Grandbois and Bonnie Selzler, from the College of Nursing at the University of North Dakota, had their paper, “Best Practices for Psychological Support of Communities After a Disaster,” published in the International Journal of Safety and Security Engineering: Disaster Management and Human Health Risk II.

NDSU Researcher Uses Supercomputing Power to Study the Sun I 3/16/2012

March 16, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Researcher Cherish Bauer-Reich wants to look inside the sun. More accurately, she wants to simulate the sun to study plasma flows associated with sunspot cycles. The cycles play a role in solar storms, which can affect satellites and disrupt a host of modern communication technologies, from cell phones to power grids.

Scientists recently warned about a series of solar storms in early March, concerned that it could affect global positioning systems, power grids, satellites and airplane travel. With the sun’s normal 11-year cycle, these very active solar storms are expected to continue.

Bauer-Reich, a research engineer at NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, is pursuing her doctorate degree in geophysics. She’s using supercomputing power to create a model of the sun. “I need something that has a lot of computing power. Basically, when you’re running these, you break the sun down into a big grid. And you have to compute all these variables at each node of the grid. When you’re dealing with tens of thousands of grid points, you need a lot of computing.”

The Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST) at NDSU provides the power for Bauer-Reich’s research. She looked at computing centers in Minnesota and Arizona to do the work, but found that CCAST in Fargo provided an easily accessible route to the supercomputing needed.

“I wasn’t surprised that the university has a facility like this. I was actually more surprised at how easy it was to get in and work with them,” says Bauer-Reich.  “When I’ve talked with people that work with supercomputing, and I know some who are starting to go to places like China, because it’s hard to get in to a lot of the supercomputing facilities in the U.S., either there’s no time available, or it’s really expensive.”

NDSU’s supercomputing center (CCAST) is available to students, faculty and staff researchers, and available for researchers and industry that are partnering with NDSU. With secure facilities in NDSU’s Research and Technology Park, CCAST provides 13 TFLOPS (trillion Floating Point Operations Per Second) of peak theoretical computational performance to excel in today’s competitive research arena.

“I could not do anything on my dissertation without having access to a computing center like this,” says Bauer-Reich. “It would be a showstopper if I didn’t have it because the emphasis is on the computational model.”

While people have heard of sunspots, most aren’t aware of what actually causes them. “ It’s a big tube of magnetic flux basically,” says Bauer-Reich.  “These things pop out of the top of the convection zone and then they pop back in. And where they pop back out and pop back in, they reduce the amount of heat and the amount of light coming out of the sun, which is why they look dark. It’s because they’re at different temperatures than the rest of the area around them,” she explains.

Sunspots tend to work in cycles, starting at high latitudes and then migrating toward the equator. “Helioseismologists study vibrations in the sun and they image what’s underneath the outer layer. What they’ve found is that when these sunspots are popping up, there’s also a flow right next to them, so that the plasma is flowing at a different speed than on either side of them. What I’m trying to study is how strong that flow has to be,” says Bauer-Reich. “These things can only be studied using computers because we can’t really look inside the sun or go take measurements of the sun. So the only way to do it is to come up with these models that try to predict behavior.”

Bauer-Reich expects running all the computer models on CCAST will take approximately a year, followed by the analysis of the data.

A native of Minot, N.D., who grew up in Bismarck and Fargo, Bauer-Reich earned her undergraduate degree in physics from NDSU and her master’s degree in electrical engineering from NDSU. The availability of the supercomputing facilities at NDSU means she can be with her husband and children while completing her dissertation, rather than traveling much of the time. “It’s nice that I was able to come back here and do research and have access to this computing.”

More than 180 researchers engage in more than 50 projects using CCAST facilities at NDSU, according to Martin Ossowski, CCAST director. Projects include: renewable energy, multiprocessor electronic circuitry, modeling of atmospheric plasma, ways to monitor the health of bridges and vehicles, computational biology, tissue engineering, human bone modeling, and agroinformatics.

Ossowski says today’s supercomputing environment emphasizes not just speed, but the ability to help researchers tailor software to conduct their research, as well as meeting researchers’ data lifecycle needs. In addition, CCAST at NDSU serves as an on-ramp for researchers to access even larger computational highways. For example, CCAST helps researchers access national resources such as XSEDE (National Science Foundation Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) and INCITE (U.S. Department of Energy Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment), and OSG (cross-agency Open Science Grid).

“We assist researchers who are pursuing discovery in energy, materials, environment, genomics, health, and in other areas of national research priority,” said Ossowski. “We have faculty on campus who are also accessing national supercomputing centers in their research.” Transmitting data across national networks or using cloud high performance computing can be costly or in some cases even impractical, so substantial high performance computing resources are available at NDSU as well. CCAST provides high performance computing infrastructure for the NDSU Campus, the Research and Technology Park, and their industrial partners, as well as engages in its own original research.

NDSU’s Vice President for Research, Dr. Philip Boudjouk, says computer modeling represents the wave of the present and the future in science. “Such modeling can save money before even conducting lab experiments. All the data then has to be analyzed. Computers and data storage facilities can help make the data permanently useful to scientists for future research.”

Supercomputing is as important to business as it is to scientific researchers. In a white paper titled “Global Leadership Through Modeling and Simulation,” the U.S. Council on Competitiveness says “to out-compete is to out-compute.” For example, Boeing used a national supercomputing center to accelerate design of the 787 and 747-8 airliners and Navistar Corp. designed technologies for better fuel efficiency in trucks.

From her standpoint, researcher Cherish Bauer-Reich appreciates access to supercomputing available at NDSU CCAST. “I do think it’s really cool that I get to be here to do my research.”

NDSU Graduate Student Named NASA Intern I 3/15/2012

March 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – NDSU chemistry and biochemistry  graduate student Anoklase Ayitou has been selected as an intern with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where he will work under the guidance of electronics engineer Mahmooda Sultana in spring 2012.

“The internship program will not only allow me to learn the kind of research conducted at the center, but it will also expose me to realistic applications of basic research that contributes to flight missions and earth and planetary sciences,” Ayitou said.

At the flight center, Ayitou will develop the chemistry and procedures for in situ synthesis of stationary phases for microfluidic/microchannel-based chromatography systems. “I am excited to have Anoklase work with us on one of my projects because his background and expertise match very well with the project needs,” Sultana said. “I think this project will give him an opportunity to apply skills learned in the graduate program at NDSU to some real applications, such as the development of an in situ analytical tool that will be used to explore the presence of life in other planets and moons.”

Ayitou was selected for the program based on his ability to carry out cutting-edge research with unique applications. He is funded by the North Dakota Space Grant Program and the NASA Higher Education Program.

As a doctoral candidate in Sivaguru Jayaraman’s NDSU lab, Ayitou’s research covers major areas of chemistry such as organic synthesis, photochemistry, photophysics and analytical and physical chemistry. His thesis work focuses on achieving higher enantioselectivity in light-induced synthesis using molecularly chiral chromophores. “This will be an ideal opportunity for Anoklase to develop leadership skills,” Jayaraman said. “I am also very proud to have him as a graduate student in my research group.”

Ayitou previously was awarded several prestigious fellowships, including the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, United Negro College Fund/Merck Graduate Research Fellowship and 2011 National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers-GlaxoSmithKline Graduate Award.

NDSU Graduate Assistant to Participate in Clinton Global Initiative University I 3/15/2012

March 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Amy Nash, graduate assistant for the Memorial Union Gallery and Store at NDSU, has been selected to participate in the fifth Clinton Global Initiative University. The event is scheduled for March 30 to April 1 at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

The Clinton Global Initiative University, which was launched in 2007 by former President Bill Clinton, challenges college students to address global issues with practical, innovative solutions. The meetings consist of working sessions, skill sessions and large plenary sessions, where participants can learn about creative approaches to solving global issues.

Each participant makes a Commitment to Action – a new, specific and measurable plan that addresses a challenge on their campus, in their local community or around the world. Nash’s application revolved around a commitment to sustainability on the three-tiered approach of the balance of economics, social issues and environment. She wrote about the need for a comprehensive plan that is implemented toward sustainability on a campus that can be scaled to apply to a city like Fargo and eventually a state such as North Dakota. These are concepts are related to her graduate studies.

NDSU Assistant Professor Presents at International Conference I 3/15/2012

March 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, was invited to give a talk at the first annual meeting of the Society for Combined Therapy – East Meets West held Feb. 4 in Boston. Wu’s talk, “Cancer Therapeutics: Current Status,” focused on current research advances for cancer treatments and targeted therapy.

The Society for Combined Therapy-East Meets West is an international non-profit organization for professional and cancer patients, as well as better cancer treatment advocates. It is registered and headquartered in Boston. It calls for change in cancer care, hopeful better and cost effective cancer treatment using combined Western medicine and Eastern medicine. Wu was named vice president for the society in 2011. 

NDSU Faculty Publish, Present I 3/15/2012

March 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Sharon Query, assistant professor of human development and family science and 4-H youth specialist, received a $16,065 grant from the North Dakota Governor’s Prevention Advisory Council on Drugs and Alcohol to provide travel stipends and printed material to participants in the April “Power of Parents” training in Bismarck.

Carol Buchholz Holland, assistant professor of counseling at NDSU; James Korcuska, associate professor of counseling; and Robert C. Nielsen,
professor of counseling, presented numerous professional programs at the North Dakota Counseling Association Midwinter Conference in Bismarck. Holland presented “Applications of Solution-Focused Approach in Schools” and “ACE 101: Helpful Tips on How to Apply for the Award of Counseling Excellence.”

Korcuska presented “Motivational Interviewing; Preparing Clients for Change,” and Nielsen presented “Stress and the Helping Profession”and “Jeopardy: Round Two Cognitive Theories.” The three jointly presented “NDSU Counselor Education Program Update.”

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, and Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor
of nursing, have been awarded $7,000 by the Innovative Small Grants program of the Society for Research on Adolescents. The grant will allow them to travel to Kenya to collect data for their research, which focuses on culturally specific risk and protective factors that influence rural adolescent behaviors and outcomes in the developed and developing world.

Christi McGeorge and Tom Carlson, associate professors of human development and family science at NDSU, and their colleague, Russell Toomey from Arizona State University, had the article, “Establishing the validity of the feminist couple therapy scale: Measuring therapists’ use of feminist practices with heterosexual couples,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy.

Beth Blodgett Salafia, assistant professor of human development and family science, had an article appear in the February issue of
the Journal of Child and Family Studies. Te article, “Associations between multiple types of stress and disordered eating among
girls and boys in middle school,” was co-written by Jessica Lemer, who earned a master’s degree in human development and family
science in 2010. Blodgett Salafia attended the Society for Research on Adolescence conference in early March where she presented research on three different studies on eating disorders.

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty Member Publishes Cancer Research I 3/15/2012

March 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences; Kruttika Bhat, doctoral student in the Wu lab; and Fengfei Wang, research associate in pharmaceutical sciences, co-wrote the article, “SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling induces pancreatic cancer cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro through non-canonical activation of Hedgehog pathway,” which will be published by Cancer Letters.

In this current project, they report the role of stromal-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 in pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism of stromal-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-mediated pancreatic cancer invasion. They show that there is a cross talk between stromal-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis and non-canonical Hedgehog pathway in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, their data demonstrate that the ligand of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4, stromal-derived factor-1 induces C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive pancreatic cancer invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and activates the non-canonical Hedgehog pathway. Moreover, they also demonstrate that the invasion of a pancreatic cancer and EMT resulting from the activation of stromal-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis is selectively  inhibited by Smoothened inhibitor cyclopamine and siRNA specificc to Gli-1.

“Collectively, these data demonstrate that stromal-derived factor- 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 modulates the non-canonical Hedgehog pathway by increasing the transcription of Smoothened in a ligand-independent manner. Taken together, stromal-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis may represent a promising therapeutic target to prevent pancreatic cancer progression,” Wu said.

The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.

NDSU Computer Science Faculty Member Receives National Science Foundation CAREER Award I 3/14/2012

March 14, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A major national grant received by a North Dakota State University computer science assistant professor will be used to help develop more effective methods to test software, enhance computer science curriculum, and provide opportunities for student researchers.

Hyunsook Do, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science at NDSU, Fargo, has received a Faculty Early Career Development award (CAREER) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Do will receive a five-year, $500,000 award from the NSF to conduct research outlined in her proposal titled “Context-aware Regression Testing Techniques and Empirical Evaluations of Their Economic Impact.” She is the first member of the Computer Science Department at NDSU to receive a CAREER award.
 
When developers create, enhance and update software programs, regression analysis is used to find and fix bugs in the software code, a time-consuming process that is responsible for a significant percentage of software costs. Dr. Do’s research program will lay a foundation to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of regression testing techniques and strategies in practical ways. The potential discoveries made by this research are expected to promote software dependability. The research is expected to:  create cost-effective regression testing strategies to address the testing process and domain contexts; create regression testing strategies that address system lifetimes; create economic models that enable the adequate assessment of techniques and strategies; and evaluate and refine these techniques and strategies through rigorous empirical approaches.
 
Dr. Do notes that while some progress in this area of research has been achieved, three important aspects of the regression testing problem have not been considered. “Most regression testing research has focused on creating new techniques, and very little work has considered factors involving the context in which testing occurs,” said Dr. Do, “but context factors are very important in practical testing situations for identifying and assessing appropriate regression testing techniques.”
 
In addition, most research has taken a snapshot view of regression testing, using an approach centering on single systems versions. “This approach, however, ignores the fact that regression testing is performed repeatedly across a system’s lifetime, and techniques may exhibit different cost-benefit tradeoffs when assessed across entire system lifetimes than when assessed relative to individual versions.” According to Dr. Do, most empirical evaluations of regression testing techniques have relied on limited metrics and have not considered the economic impact of the techniques. “To properly assess regression testing techniques and strategies in terms of economic benefits, we need economic models that capture important cost factors and quantify benefits.”
 
Graduate and undergraduate students will be involved in Dr. Do’s research and will focus on two common application domains that require different testing processes: large-scale industrial applications and web applications that require frequent patches. The overall goal of the research is to develop more effective regression testing techniques for the software industry and foster additional research in the field.

In preliminary work, Dr. Do has developed an economic model, EVOMO (EVOlution-aware economic MOdel for regression testing). This model captures the costs and benefits of regression testing techniques relative to particular regression testing processes, considering techniques in light of their business value to organizations, in terms of the cost to apply the techniques, and how much revenue they help organizations obtain.

Dr. Do will also use the CAREER award to enhance current graduate course curriculum and to develop a new graduate course on software testing and its economic implications. “Most important overall, the discoveries my students and I make will promote software dependability, with potential benefits to organizations and persons who depend on that software,” said Dr. Do.

“Dr. Hyunsook Do provides a great example of successful work/life balance in a discipline, Computer Science, not known for being exceeding hospitable toward women. She has attained one of the highest honors in her profession. Dr. Do is an absolutely solid role model for young academics and especially young women. We commend her on her achievements,” said Dr. Brian Slator, chair of the computer science department at NDSU.
 
“Dr. Do is leading the way for a superb group of young investigators in a very strong computer science department,” said Dr. Kevin McCaul, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.
 
Dr. Do joined the NDSU Department of Computer Science in 2007. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She received her bachelor’s degree in computer science from Sungshin Women’s University, Seoul, Korea, and her master’s degree in computer science from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan. Previously, Dr. Do served as senior research staff at the Electronics and Telecommunication Research Institute (ETRI), Korea.

Since 1996, sixteen faculty members at NDSU have received prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER awards. “NDSU researchers continue a standard of excellence that reflect the institution’s ability to attract the best and the brightest among new faculty researchers,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer.
 
Overall, National Science Foundation CAREER awardees at NDSU have received more than $6.8 million in grants to conduct research in biology, chemistry, civil and electrical engineering, computer science, pharmaceutical sciences, and coatings and polymeric materials. NSF career awardees currently at NDSU include faculty members Gregory Cook, Seth Rasmussen, Wenfang Sun, Sivaguru Jayaraman and Uwe Burghaus in chemistry and biochemistry, Sanku Mallik in pharmaceutical sciences, Magdy Abdelrahman, Xuefeng Chu, Kalpana Katti and Eakalak Khan in civil engineering, Kendra Greenlee in biological sciences, and Hyunsook Do in computer science.
 
The National Science Foundation CAREER program recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of scholars who are likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. Recipients are chosen on the basis of creative career development plans that integrate research and education within the context of their university’s mission.

NDSU Assistant Professor Receives International Fellowship I 3/14/2012

March 14, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Samee U. Khan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NDSU, has received the 2012 Chinese Academy of Sciences Young International Scientist Fellowship. The fellowship’s aim is to foster close collaborations between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and international researchers. Khan will work with academy researchers in the newly established Center for Cloud Computing at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology.

“The Center for Cloud Computing has state-of-the-art facilities, which makes it a very attractive proposition for international researchers,” Khan said.

Khan chairs the steering committee for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Technical Area of Green Computing. The technical area promotes research and education on the general topic of green computing that covers domains, such as cloud computing, utility computing, cluster computing, supercomputing and cyberinfrastructures.

“I feel honored to be selected for the fellowship. I hope that I can form close collaborations with academy researchers and also interface NDSU researchers with the Chinese Academy to address research issues related to the energy efficiency in cloud computing,” Khan said.

Khan is an adjunct professor in the NDSU computer science department and an adjunct professor of computer science at the Commission on Science and Technology for Sustainable Development in the South Asia Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan. 

NDSU Animal Sciences Graduate Student Receives Grant I 3/14/2012

March 14, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Quynn Larson, a first-year master’s degree student in animal sciences at NDSU, received a grant from the North Dakota State Board of Agriculture Research and Education and the North Dakota Corn Council. The funding will enable Larson to continue work on the impacts of dried distillers grains with solubles supplementation on livestock performance and meat quality. The grant is titled “Development of self-limiting DDGS for yearling livestock.” Larson is working with Bryan Neville, assistant animal scientist, and Rob Maddock, associate professor of animal sciences at NDSU.

NDSU CNSE Lab to Analyze Clay Samples from ND Oilpatch Counties I 3/9/2012

March 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Scientists in a lab at NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) are analyzing materials that could eventually play a role in North Dakota oil exploration.

As part of a research agreement with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) in Bismarck, N.D., the Materials Characterization and Analysis Laboratory at NDSU CNSE is analyzing 198 clay samples to determine their composition and suitability for use as a component in hydraulic fracturing. The clays show early promise for potential use as a key material known as ceramic proppant, used in the fracking process to help keep fractures open. The fracking process is used to extract oil and natural gas deep within the ground in places such as the Williston Basin.

The MCAL lab at CNSE provides scientific expertise and a unique set of analytical capabilities and instruments not typically found in other settings. “The lab has excellent analytical equipment, a very good reputation for generating accurate results in a timely manner, and the lab personnel are easy to work with,” said Ed Murphy, state geologist for North Dakota.

Energy industry publications have referenced shortages of proppant. Results from the scientific study of the samples could shed light on whether North Dakota could eventually supply some of the proppant materials needed for oil exploration.

The clay, known as kaolinite, is found in some hillsides in western North Dakota. Researchers at NDSU CNSE will use x-ray fluorescence to determine which elements and how much of those elements are contained in samples from the various locations.  Out of the 198 samples, the scientists will also analyze 36 clay samples using x-ray diffraction to determine the amount of kaolinite, illite, chlorite and other substances that may be in the samples. The testing is expected to take approximately five months. The samples being tested at CNSE come from Adams, Bowman, Dunn, Golden Valley, Grant, Hettinger, Mercer, Morton, Slope, and Stark counties.

“The labs and scientific staff at NDSU CNSE have unique capabilities. We frequently partner with agencies and industry on projects,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research at NDSU. “We’re glad to be able to provide such expertise that may be of future assistance to the state’s energy enterprise.”

Supercomputing Could Play Role in Energy Development I 3/9/2012

March 9, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Advancing technology to secure the nation’s energy future was among the topics discussed at the North Dakota Energy Symposium held at NDSU on March 5.  Attendees from industry, government and academia discussed the role of supercomputing facilities including NDSU’s Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST). Such facilities can aid in development of clean energy technologies, smart-grid transmission systems, increased production in oil and gas fields, and methods to better predict wind farm production.

“By merging together the best ideas and practices from university, government and industry, we can produce more energy with better environmental stewardship,” said U.S. Senator John Hoeven, who was keynote speaker at the event. “North Dakota is leading the way in energy production, and research and technology play a key role in our success.”

NDSU Provost Bruce Rafert emphasized that important advances in clean energy production have widespread global impacts. “It’s one of the great geopolitical issues of our time and all are issues of great importance for North Dakota,” said Rafert. He noted the use of high performance computing in energy research to optimize development, design and processing through modeling and simulation.

Collaboration between national scientific laboratories and NDSU’s supercomputing capabilities could lead to increases in energy production with a smaller environmental footprint, according to Sen. Hoeven.

“In partnership with industry and academia, the high performance computing and science and technology expertise resident at national labs such as Lawrence Livermore, can stimulate the rapid advancement of U.S. clean energy technologies essential to the nation’s energy security,” said Tomás Díaz de la Rubia, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory deputy director for Science & Technology, who spoke at the symposium.

NDSU has received $18 million for supercomputing research from the U.S. Department of Energy since 2008.

Computation often serves as a fourth dimension of research, according to Philip Boudjouk, NDSU vice president for Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer. Research projects highlighted at NDSU included solar and photovoltaic energy applications, oil shale, liquid silicon, and new polymers from renewable crops in North Dakota, among others.

“Researchers will develop a Mount Everest of data by noon on any given day,” said Boujdouk. “CCAST at NDSU provides access to computer modeling and simulation, on-ramps to federal data centers and computational expertise. These are valuable tools to advance research.”

The tsunami of data requires powerful computational science to solve problems, according to Martin Ossowski, CCAST director. These resources are being used by industry on many projects including designing drill bits and pipelines.

Mark Nisbet, North Dakota Principal Manager for Xcel Energy, emphasized the energy industry’s creation of jobs in the state, as well as his company’s support of a diverse mix of energy sources, and the benefits of access to engineering students at NDSU.

Moderators of expert panel discussions at the symposium included Dr. Kalpana Katti, distinguished professor of civil engineering at NDSU; Dr. Alan Kallmeyer, chair of mechanical engineering; and Dr. Kendall Nygard, computer science professor at NDSU.

Sponsors of the event included U.S. Senator John Hoeven, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, The Howard Baker Forum, and NDSU’s Office of Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer.

NDSU Research and Technology Park to Offer Youth Entrepreneurship Academy I 3/6/2012

March 6, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The NDSU Research and Technology Park  http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com/Pages/default.aspx is scheduled to host the third annual Youth Entrepreneurship Academy for area high school juniors and seniors April 13, 14, 17, 19, 24, 26 and 28.

The program is for students interested in science, mathematics, technology or entrepreneurship. They will learn to identify a possible business, develop a product or service, create a marketing plan and pitch the idea to potential investors. There is a $50 registration fee, which can be waived if needed. Interested students should contact their counselor or teacher for a nomination packet.

For more information, contact Paul Tefft at paul@ndsuresearchpark.com or 701-499-3628 or Emily Schreier at emily@ndsuresearchpark.com or 701-499-3600.

March Science Café Analyzes Children’s Language Development I 3/6/2012

March 7, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erin Conwell, assistant professor of psychology at NDSU, is scheduled to present the March Science Café titled, “When getting it wrong means they’re getting right: What children’s errors tell us about their language skills,” on Tuesday, March 13, at 7 p.m. in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

Children learning to talk often start off fine but then suddenly begin saying things that aren’t quite right, Conwell said. They “holded” the kitten, “goed” to the store and “falled” the book. Parents may think these errors are cute, or possibly cause for concern, but language development researchers take them as evidence of a very sophisticated understanding of English. When children make such errors, they are testing the limits of their language and exploring the relationship between words, rules and meaning, Conwell said.

The presentation will examine the forms these errors take, what they tell us about language development, how scientists try to trick children into making them for research purposes and why trying to correct them probably isn’t going to work. 

Attendees must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information, contact Keri Drinka at keri.drinka@ndsu.edu or 231-6131. Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees.

NDSU Developmental Psychologist Digs into the Complexities of Eating Disorders and Body Image I 3/5/2012

March 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Eating disorders are often thought to be a female problem, but NDSU developmental psychologist Elizabeth Blodgett Salafia’s research has proved that idea wrong. She has found poor body image and eating disorders are problems for males, too. Salafia, assistant professor in human development and family science at NDSU, has researched eating disorders, body image and how different relationships affect both for four years at NDSU.

She became interested in this area of research while working on her doctorate in developmental psychology at the University of Notre Dame. Her adviser’s research focused on how parenting affects adolescent adjustment. Salafia noticed little research on how parental relationships affect eating disorders and body image, which became the focus of her dissertation. Since then, her research has revealed more about the causes, what the general population knows and how different relationships affect the development of eating disorders. 

Eating Attitudes Study

The Eating Attitudes Study is a two-year study on parent, sibling and peer influences on adolescents’ eating disorder attitudes and behaviors. Salafia and student researchers surveyed middle and high school girls and boys in Bismarck, N.D. The researchers asked about dieting, body image, stress and relationships with different people in their lives. 

Through this study, Salafia found connections between parents’ marital conflict and eating disorders in girls. However, girls who had quality relationships with their parents, despite martial conflict, tended to be healthier than girls who witnessed marital conflict and had poor relationships with their parents. “Clearly, family has a significant role in promoting the health of girls and young women,” Salafia said.

The study also found that girls reported higher levels of stress than boys and that stressors that led to body dissatisfaction, dieting and bulimic systems were different for girls and boys. For girls, performance, relationship and family stress were associated with body dissatisfaction and dieting, but stress was not associated with bulimic symptoms. For boys, performance, relationship, education, financial and family stress were associated with body dissatisfaction. Relationship, education and financial stress were associated with dieting, and education and family stress was associated with bulimic symptoms. 

Salafia will continue to analyze and report data from this study during the next few years, she said.

Causes of Eating Disorders Study

The Causes of Eating Disorders Study focuses on what people who do and don’t have eating disorders think causes them. Study participants also were asked where or how they learned about the cause of eating disorders. 

Salafia found that people who have been clinically diagnosed with eating disorders gave answers in line with research findings on the causes. People who don’t have eating disorders tended to blame media for portraying unrealistic body images. They reported they considered that information to be common knowledge. “The general population is not getting the right information,” Salafia said. 

Body Image and Sexual Activity Study

For the Body Image and Sexual Activity Study, Salafia collaborated with another NDSU faculty member, Kristen Benson, to conduct online surveys of 500 women attending NDSU, the University of North Dakota, Minnesota State University Moorhead and Concordia College. 

She looked at whether dating status and body mass index affect how women perceive their bodies and sexuality. She found that women who have higher body mass indexes had more body dissatisfaction but still believed they were good sexual partners. “That is a very encouraging finding,” Salafia said. She also found women who were dating had better body images and believed they were good sexual partners. Another finding was that women who had liberal attitudes about sex had better body image that led to increased sexual activity.

Hands-on research experience

Salafia involves students in the research process from study design and data collection to co-writing articles and presenting at conferences. 

Graduate research assistant Emily Haugen conducts literature searches, runs analyses, codes data, searches for grant funding, prepares posters and abstracts for conference submission and edits papers. She is also co-writing a paper and basing her master’s thesis on results from the Eating Attitudes Study.  “I’ve learned you don’t have to be a statistics genius to understand research and be involved in this field,” Haugen said. “Statistics is not my strong point, but Dr. Salafia has worked with me to understand it and apply it in a meaningful way for my thesis.”

As a graduate research assistant, Haugen has gained an in-depth knowledge of eating disorders, which will help her in her career as a marriage and family therapist. “I feel that my experience with body image and eating disorder research will be very helpful when working with the adolescent or young adult populations as well as families impacted by this devastating condition,” she said. “Eating disorders are a great example of an area where researchers and clinicians can collaborate to provide the best care possible for families.”

Being involved in research also has caused Haugen to consider pursuing a doctorate someday. “I don’t think I would have even considered this option if I hadn’t had the positive experience here with research,” she said. “I feel that my studies in my program and my work with Dr. Salafia have prepared me tremendously well if I do continue on with my education.”

Salafia looks forward to getting more undergraduates involved when renovations on the Eating Disorders and Body Image Lab at the Graduate Center are complete. She plans to conduct research there as well as offer programming to reduce body dissatisfaction and dieting behaviors among girls and young women in the community. Her long-term goal is to take her outreach programs to school settings because of the significant influence peers have on boys’ and girls’ body image and eating behaviors. “I would like the work I do, both in the classroom and through my research, to spread awareness of eating disorders,” Salafia said. “It is important for people to know that disordered eating among youth is also a serious concern and may start in the form of body dissatisfaction or dieting and lead to a clinically diagnosable eating disorder.”

NDSU Faculty Receive Grant to Conduct Research in Kenya I 3/5/2012

March 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor of nursing at NDSU, and Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science at NDSU, received funding from the Society for Research on Adolescence Innovative Small Grants program to conduct research in Kenya. The grant will explore the social and cultural context of risk and protective factors related to adolescent health among rural Kenyan adolescents.

NDSU Partners on $1 Million Energy Beet Development Project I 3/5/2012

March 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A project that will develop an advanced biofuel from energy beets and provide growers across North Dakota with a new industrial crop is taking another step forward, fueled by a two-year North Dakota Renewable Energy Council grant.

Cole Gustafson, chair of NDSU’s Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, said the project “is truly a public-private partnership between Fargo-based Green Vision Group and Muscatine, Iowa-based Heartland Renewable Energy, with research by NDSU to develop North Dakota’s energy beet biofuel industry.” NDSU’s Department of Agriculture and Bio-Systems Engineering and the Carrington Research Extension Center will continue to provide research for the project.

The $1 million phase II project includes $500,000 in funds from the North Dakota Renewable Energy Council, which was approved by the Industrial Commission, plus cash match funds from industry partners, Betaseed and Syngenta, and in-kind contributions. The project seeks to establish a United States Department of Agriculture/Risk Management Agency multi-peril crop insurance program for energy beets; engineer and evaluate new front-end energy beet processing methods; expand regional energy beet research trials; scale up whole energy beet and juice storage technology to enable year-round processing; and inform producers, community developers and the biofuel industry of the emerging opportunity.  

“We envision developing at least 12 sustainable ethanol facilities across North Dakota,” said Maynard Helgaas, president of Green Vision Group. “Each plant will use energy beets grown within a 20-mile radius and support job creation in rural communities. This grant will help us make significant progress toward that vision and help develop North Dakota’s energy beet biofuel industry.”

Green Vision Group is in the process of selecting the location for its first processing facility, which is expected to produce 20 million gallons of ethanol per year once complete.

The first phase of the energy beet project was focused on research, including yield trials, storage research and commercially testing the use of a co-product to provide processing heat. Current yield trials are located in Dazey/Hannaford, Turtle Lake, Langdon, Minot, Williston, Carrington and Oakes, and 2012 trial plots will expand to include Jamestown, Harvey, Litchville and Colgate. The yield trials will continue to be sponsored by Betaseed and Syngenta.

The plot trial research results in phase I exceeded expectations, said Blaine Schatz, director of the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center. “Our research so far shows that energy beets can be grown successfully outside of the Red River Valley in a variety of soil types and conditions,” Schatz said. “The beets actually help growers improve their soil health, in addition to giving them greater farm income.”

Ethanol produced from energy beets can be sold at a premium, Gustafson said. “We expect the energy beet ethanol will produce 50 to 60 percent less greenhouse gas emissions than petroleum-based fuels, which will designate it as an advanced biofuel,” he said. “We are working to finalize the lifecycle analysis of energy beets through a formal Environmental Protection Agency application. Securing EPA approval of energy beets as an advanced biofuel will mean a significant premium for producers and processors in the sugar-based ethanol market.” 

The lifecycle analysis research is funded in part by a separate grant from the North Dakota Agricultural Products Utilization Commission and community donations. “North Dakota farmers, processors and rural communities should see positive financial returns by growing and processing energy beets for biofuel,” Gustafson said. 

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present I 3/5/2012

March 5, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Claudette Peterson, assistant professor in the School of Education at NDSU, is publishing “What managerial leadership behaviors do student managerial leaders need? An empirical study of student organizational members” in the Journal of Leadership Education.

Elizabeth Erichsen, assistant professor in the School of Education, recently had an article, “Learning for Change: Transforming International Experience as Identity Work, published in the Journal for Transformative Education.

Brad Strand, professor of health, nutrition, and exercise science, and Kristen Hetland, from Concordia College, had their paper, “A Status Report of PETE Faculty in the Central District,” published in The Physical Educator. The paper was completed as a portion of Hetland's doctoral program in the College of Human Development and Education wellness option.

Jooyeon Ha, assistant professor of apparel, design and hospitality management at NDSU, had several refereed journal articles accepted to journals. “Determinants of variety seeking intention in restaurants” was accepted to Journal of Services Marketing. “Consumer value in restaurants: Does it vary across different segments?” was accepted to Journal of Foodservice Business Research. “Effects of ethnic authenticity: Examining Koran restaurant customers in the U.S.” is being published in the International Journal of Hospitality Management. “Are loyal customers in Korean restaurants different? From quality perception perspectives” was accepted to the Journal of Foodservice Business Research.

Anita Welch, Claudette Peterson and Chris Ray had “A Cross-Cultural Validation of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) in Turkey and the United States” accepted for publication in Research in Science and Technological Education.

James Korcuska, associate professor in the School of Education at NDSU, presented “Working with Kids Prescribed Psychiatric Medications: Resources for School Counselors” to approximately 50 Fargo public school counselors and other service providers during their In Service day at Fargo North High School on Jan. 16. Korcuska, along with co-leader David Hulac and team member Irene Harper, both from the University of South Dakota, presented the results from their 18-month, multi-site treatment program evaluation for the South Dakota Federal Pretrial Probation Services in Sioux Falls, S.D., on Jan. 4, 2011.

Yeong Rhee, associate professor in health, nutrition, and exercise sciences at NDSU, was selected to participate in the Higher Education Resources Services Institute for summer 2012. The institute prepares women faculty and administrators for institutional leadership roles. A diverse group of approximately 70 women is selected for the institute.

Chris Ray, assistant professor in the School of Education, was selected as a research faculty member for the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate. Valerie Anderson, graduate of the education doctoral program, will be a research fellow. Ray and Anderson will serve as the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education Research Team.

NDSU Study Finds Magazine Type, Gender Affect How Health News is Reported I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A new study by a North Dakota State University faculty member and alumnus found health magazines are more likely than general popular culture magazines to use powerless language, or language that lacks certainty or directness, when reporting new health information.

The research was conducted by Stephenson Beck, assistant professor of communication, and Ashley Fandrich, who earned a master’s degree in communication from NDSU in 2010. The study was part of Fandrich’s master’s thesis under Beck’s direction.

The paper, “Powerless Language in Health Media: The Influence of Biological Sex and Magazine Type on Health Language,” was published in the January-March 2012 Communication Studies
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcst20/current.
 
While uncertain language is considered less credible in many contexts, past research on written communication indicates it is important in science and health reporting because it improves accuracy by acknowledging the limitations of new data, Beck and Fandrich wrote.

According to the study, media is the most popular source of new health information, but people are sometimes skeptical of news reports because they hear contradictory messages. “News reports focus on the exciting aspect of the news story, but neglect the details that properly frame it,” Beck said. “We found that magazines devoted to health issues are more willing to include the necessary qualifiers to make the report accurate, whereas more popular magazines do not provide this information.”

For the study, Beck and Fandrich reviewed 141 health articles from health or general popular culture magazines, published between October 2008 and September 2009, that specifically targeted a male or female audience. Each article was broken into thought units or statements that could stand alone as a complete thought. Words and phrases that moderated a statement, phrases or punctuation that caused pauses and tag questions were identified as powerless language.

Frequency of powerless language based on author sex and topic focus
Female author                                
 Health focus   General focus        
  13.3%                7.7%                                         
Male author
 Health focus   General focus
  6.8%                  3.4%  

Frequency of powerless language based on audience sex and topic focus
Female audience                             
 Health focus    General focus         
  12%                       8.4%                                     
Male audience
 Health focus    General focus
  8.9%                      3.9%

Other findings in the study related to the gender of the writer and the target audience. The researchers found female authors are more likely to use powerless language. “Past research suggested that females used more powerless language when talking to females, and more powerful language when talking to males,” Beck said. “We did not find this to be the case, at least in terms of written media. Female authors used the same frequency of powerless language for both male and female audiences.” The study also found that female-targeted magazines tend to use more powerless language than male-targeted magazines.

Frequency of powerless language based on author and audience sex
Female author                                               
Female audience   Male audience         
  10.3%                         10.4%                                                     
Male author
Female audience   Male audience
   6.3%                          5.6%

The researchers noted that 91 percent of the content they reviewed included powerful language or language that is direct and conveys certainty.  “Even though powerless language made up a small portion of the data, this should not be interpreted to mean that it was less influential than powerful language,” the researchers wrote. “In fact, quite the opposite might be true. Communication that is rare may be influential, since it deviates from the norm.”

Overall, the study found female authors and health-focused magazines used more powerless language than male authors and general magazines and that powerless language was directed toward female audience more often than male audiences.

March Science Café by NDSU Analyzes Children’s Language Development I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erin Conwell, assistant professor of psychology at NDSU, is scheduled to present the March Science Café titled, “When getting it wrong means they’re getting right: What children’s errors tell us about their language skills” on Tuesday, March 13, at 7 p.m. in Stokers Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

Children learning to talk often start off fine but then suddenly begin saying things that aren’t quite right, Conwell said. They “holded” the kitten, “goed” to the store and “falled” the book. Parents may think these errors are cute, or possibly cause for concern, but language development researchers take them as evidence of a very sophisticated understanding of English. When children make such errors, they are testing the limits of their language and exploring the relationship between words, rules and meaning, Conwell said.

The presentation will examine the forms these errors take, what they tell us about language development, how scientists try to trick children into making them for research purposes and why trying to correct them probably isn’t going to work.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – James Korcuska, NDSU associate professor in the School of Education, presented “Working with Kids Prescribed Psychiatric Medications: Resources for School Counselors” to approximately 50 Fargo public school counselors and other service providers during their In Service day at Fargo North High School on Jan. 16. Korcuska, along with co-leader David Hulac and team member Irene Harper, both from the University of South Dakota, presented the results from their 18-month, multi-site treatment program evaluation for the South Dakota Federal Pretrial Probation Services in Sioux Falls, S.D., on Jan. 4, 2011.

Yeong Rhee, NDSU associate professor in health, nutrition and exercise sciences, was selected to participate in the Higher Education Resources Services Institute for summer 2012. The institute prepares women faculty and administrators for institutional leadership roles. A diverse group of approximately 70 women is selected for the institute.

Chris Ray, NDSU assistant professor in the School of Education, was selected as a research faculty member for the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate. Valerie Anderson, graduate of the education doctoral program, will be a research fellow. Ray and Anderson will serve as the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education Research Team.

NDSU Assistant Professor Presents at International Cancer Conference I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, was invited to give a talk at the "First annual meeting of the Society for Combined Therapy – East Meets West held Feb. 4 in Boston, Mass.

Wu’s talk, “Cancer Therapeutics: Current Status,” focused on current research advances for cancer treatments and targeted therapy. “I am happy to give a talk in this society and know more cancer research questions and treatment challenges from its members and audience. We will work closely with physicians and patients to conquer cancer using combined therapies,” Wu said.

The Society for Combined Therapy-East Meets West is an international non-profit organization for professional and cancer patients, as well as better cancer treatment advocates. It is registered and headquartered in Boston. It calls for change in cancer care, hopeful better and cost selective cancer treatment using combined Western medicine and Eastern medicine. Wu was named vice president for the society in 2011.

NDSU’s Maddock Carlin Publishes in Journal of Animal Science I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Kasey Maddock Carlin, assistant professor in animal sciences at North Dakota State University, had her paper, “Meat science and muscle biology symposium: Extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle development and meat quality,” recently published in the Journal of Animal Science.

In her article, Carlin identifies cells relating to muscle growth and how it relates to the meat production industry. She also discusses the importance of quality and quantity of meat production in accordance with consumers. Articles published in Journal of Animal Science encompass a broad range of research topics in animal production and fundamental aspects of genetics, nutrition, physiology, and preparation and utilization of animal products. It is considered the premier journal for animal science and serves as a leading source of new knowledge and perspective in the Midwest.

NDSU Faculty Members Present Research in Kenya I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Miriam Mara, associate professor of English at NDSU, and Andrew Mara, associate professor of English, recently presented their their research at Kenyatta University in Nairobi, Kenya. During the visit, they met with groups and with individuals to discuss research and possible future collaborations between Kenyatta University and NDSU, and they presented the seminar “Globalism, Transnationalism and Translation Problems.”

They shared research applying Arjun Appadurai’s globalism theory in health care and hospitality settings, and bridged it to some of the unique challenges of African translators. They also discussed the special pressures and misunderstandings that globalism can bring in translating technical documents for complex local cultures. In addition to presenting the seminar, they have established possible future collaboration between Kenyatta University’s Master of Arts translation program and NDSU’s upper-division writing programs. The seminar extends outreach that NDSU’s department of English is actively pursuing with universities in France, Italy and Denmark.

NDSU Animal Sciences Graduate Student Receives Grant I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Quynn Larson, a first-year master’s degree student in animal sciences, has received a grant from the North Dakota State Board of Agriculture Research and Education and the North Dakota Corn Council. The funding will enable Larson to continue work on the impacts of dried distillers grains with solubles supplementation on livestock performance and meat quality. The grant is titled “Development of self-limiting DDGS for yearling livestock.” Larson is working with Bryan Neville, assistant animal scientist, and Rob Maddock, associate professor of animal sciences at NDSU.

NDSU Professor Receives Grant for Dakota Kids Count Program I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Richard Rathge, professor in the agribusiness and applied economics department at NDSU, has received a $75,000 grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The grant provides funding for the North Dakota Kids Count program that is part of a nationwide network of state-based programs to track the status of children. The initiative is funded from the Annie E. Casey Foundation whose primary mission is to foster public policies, human-service reforms and community supports that more selectively meet the needs of today’s children and families.

The mission of North Dakota Kids Count, which has been housed at NDSU since 2003, is to provide accurate, current data on child well-being in order to inform local and state discussions about how to secure better futures for all of North Dakota’s children. The program produces two annual publications that provide county, regional and state-level profiles on children’s well-being as it relates to demographics, family composition, economics, health, education and early care and safety and risky behaviors. The program also offers other publications, presentations and newsletters throughout the year highlighting recent trends affecting North,Dakota children and families.

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Research in Journal of Transcultural Nursing I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Donna Grandbois, assistant professor of nursing at NDSU, and Gregory Sanders, associate dean for the College of Human Development and Education, had their manuscript, “Resilience and stereotyping: the experience of Native American Elders,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Transcultural Nursing. It is expected to appear in the October 2012 issue.

Grandbois also has been invited to be part of the Journal of Transcultural Nursing’s Panel of Peer Reviewers. She was recommended as an expert qualitative reviewer by senior editor Joyceen Boyle, co-author of the textbook, “Transcultural Concepts in Nursing Care.” Additionally, Grandbois and Bonnie Selzler, from the College of Nursing at the University of North Dakota, had their paper, “Best Practices for Psychological Support of Communities After a Disaster,” published in the International Journal of Safety and Security
Engineering: Disaster Management and Human Health Risk II.

NDSU Assistant Professor Receives Cooperative Grant I 2/29/2012

February 29, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Gregory McKee, assistant professor of agribusiness and applied economics at NDSU and director of the Quentin Burdick Center for Cooperatives, received a $50,000 grant from the foundation of the Cenex Harvest States cooperative education program.

The grant, titled “Quentin Burdick Center for Cooperatives,” will assist the center in its mission to provide education to college-age students in preparing them for careers with cooperatives and to better fulfill their roles as members and directors. The center also conducts research that cooperatives can use to strengthen their operating and service to members.

NDSU Animal Sciences Faculty Receive Grant to Study Ovarian Function I 2/28/2012

February 28, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded animal sciences faculty members Anna Grazul-Bilska and Dale Redmer a $393,108 grant to research the role of an important regulator of blood vessel function in the ovary. Their project is titled “The role of nitric oxide (NO) system in ovarian function.”

A goal of the three-year grant is to enhance ovarian function in normal and nutritionally compromised females in order to obtain healthy eggs (oocytes), embryos and offspring. The nitric oxide system is one of the major regulators of blood vessel growth and function; therefore, it regulates delivery and outflow of nutrients, hormones and/or other regulatory factors to and from ovaries. During the project, this system will be modified with a specific amino acid (arginine) that is a precursor for nitric oxide formation. The study will help to determine if ovarian function can be altered through arginine supplementation to improve fertility in compromised females. Results from the research will address problems in both agricultural production practices and human health.

Clean Energy Technologies Conference Scheduled at NDSU I 2/28/2012

February 28, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – A one-day “North Dakota Energy Symposium: Using Technology to Enhance Clean Energy Production,” hosted by U.S. Sen. John Hoeven, is scheduled for Monday, March 5, in the Memorial Union at NDSU. The event will feature leaders in industry, science, technology, government and academia. The program is part of a series to address “A National Roadmap on Advancing Clean Energy Technologies.” The one-day session is sponsored by The Howard Baker Forum, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and NDSU.

Join Hoeven and experts from the national laboratories and the public and private sectors for this one-day symposium focused on opportunities and constraints in energy production. Learn about the role technology can play in enhancing current energy production methods. Experts will discuss opportunities and constraints in current methods of energy production and processing and how high performance computing can enhance these methods.

Conference organizers said capabilities of NDSU’s Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology and high performance computing capabilities of national laboratories could play integral roles in helping energy leaders use computer modeling and simulation to maximize energy production and processing.

Symposium topics will range from oil and gas production to wind energy and transmission issues. Sessions include: Computing in the Bakken, Improving Access to and Maximizing Output from Existing Fossil Fuel Resources Through Modeling and Simulation; Powering the Plains Through High Performance Computing – Making Alternative Energy Mainstream; and Putting the Smart into Smart Grid. Invited speakers include representatives from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Whiting Petroleum, QEP Resources, Xcel Energy, Siemens Energy, North Dakota Department of Mineral Resources, LM Wind Power Blades, Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, NDSU and the University of North Dakota.

Moderators of the expert panel discussions include NDSU faculty Kalpana Katti, Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering; Alan Kallmeyer, chair of mechanical engineering; and Kendall Nygard, professor of computer science.

Conference organizers said computational technologies hold the promise to increase production of oil and gas fields, better predict wind farm production and address challenges related to planning and building transmission systems to move energy to market. The symposium will help identify near-term opportunities in government and industry to help create a blueprint for energy planning at the state and federal levels.

For more information and to register, go to www.regonline.com/northdakotaenergytechnologysymposium or contact evandevoorde@bakerdonelson.com.

NDSU Social Psychologist Brings Research Findings to the Public by Blogging for Psychology Today I 2/21/2012

February 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The title of Clay Routledge’s blog seems to cover most of life’s psychological bases. And thousands of people can’t wait to see what he says next.

“Death Love Sex Magic” is the social psychologist’s view of the many and varied issues that impact the human experience. Routledge is an NDSU assistant professor of psychology who regularly posts to his blog on the Psychology Today website.

“I picked the words death, love, sex and magic because they represent concepts that are important in human social life,” Routledge explained. “I think people will find the blog interesting because it’s about things most people can identify with and care about – relationships, beliefs, attitudes, politics and religion. They’re things people can intrinsically appreciate.”

Not timid of controversy, Routledge has discussed how religion can be good for your health, while his very next posting examined the negative aspects. Other articles have ranged from a series on “The Secrets to a Meaningful Life” to “Why do people still reject the theory of evolution?” to “The Social Benefits of Video Gaming.”

Routledge’s blog has received more than 200,000 hits since it began in August 2009, so Internet users around the globe clearly have been reading his many entries. A Fellow of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Routledge is a respected researcher in his field of study. Reporters from the BBC, ABC news, CBS news and Men’s Health and Cosmopolitan magazines have come to him for expert commentary. 

Routledge writes his blog in layman’s terms, taking complex scientific research studies and translating the data and outcomes into everyday language the public can understand. In keeping with NDSU’s land-grant mission to serve the needs of the state, nation and world, Routledge sees his blog as a way to reach out to others. 

“I believe in making a contribution to our broader society. Educators should make a positive contribution, and we have an obligation to inform people about our research. I get excited communicating with the public about topics that are consequential and important,” said Routledge, who earned his bachelor’s degree at Missouri Southern State University and his master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Missouri, Columbia.

“I find it all very rewarding,” Routledge continued. “My goal is to provide a service to people, but I’m receiving a lot, too. The readers respond with interesting comments, and sometimes they offer perspectives or experiences that I hadn’t thought about before.”

You can view Routledge’s writings at www.psychologytoday.com/blog/death-love-sex-magic.

NDSU Recipients of Odney, Waldron, Peltier Awards Announced I 2/21/2012

February 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Three NDSU faculty members have been selected to receive prestigious university honors. Yeong Rhee, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, was named to receive the Odney Award; Wenfang Sun, Walter F. and Verna Gehrts Professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will be recognized with the Waldron Award; and Sivaguru Jayaraman, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will be acknowledged with the Peltier Award.

The recipients will be recognized during the 15th annual Celebration of Faculty Excellence to be scheduled for later this spring. The awards are sponsored by the NDSU Development Foundation.

“We had an astonishing array of talent brought forward through the nomination process,” said Provost Bruce Rafert. “The selection committee was clearly impressed by the distinguished records of research and academic ability of our nominees.”

Rhee received 30 nominations for the Odney Award, which was established by the family of Robert Odney to recognize outstanding faculty teaching. 

“She is an incredible instructor; she presents information clearly and gives real-world situation examples,” wrote student Amanda Middaugh in a letter nominating Rhee for the Odney Award. “She is a wonderful instructor and person who has made a positive contribution to my educational experience at NDSU.”

Student Leah Gramlow wrote, “Dr. Rhee is the best teacher I’ve had in my 17 years of being a student. She cares about our understanding of the content we cover in class and she would do anything to help a student succeed in school and in life.”

Rhee, who joined the NDSU faculty in 2002, earned her doctorate in human nutrition at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater. She is a registered dietitian, and a member of the American Society of Nutrition and the American Dietetic Association.

The Fred Waldron Research Award was established with the NDSU Development Foundation Board of Trustees to recognize outstanding faculty research. Sun was nominated for the honor by faculty members Gregory Cook, Mukund Sibi and Jayaraman. 

“She has been an extremely proficient researcher, an excellent educator and outstanding colleague and leader in service,” they wrote in a nomination letter. 

Sun’s nomination states she has established a world-renowned research program in the area of new materials for optical sensing, photo limiting devices, photodynamic therapy for cancer and medical imaging. It notes Sun has brought more than $4 million in extramural funding to campus, and she has had more than 15 papers published in the past year.

“Dr. Sun is an outstanding colleague who has made an outstanding impact in her field of research both locally and globally,” wrote Cook, Sibi and Jayaraman.

Sun joined the NDSU faculty in 2001. She earned her bachelor’s degree at Wuhan University in China and her doctorate in chemistry from the Institute of Photographic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. She also was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

The Peltier Award was established by Joseph and Norma Peltier to recognize outstanding innovation in teaching. Jayaraman was nominated by faculty colleagues Cook and Sun and graduate student Anoklase Ayitou. 

The nominators note Jayaraman teaches with “flair and enthusiasm and brings his extensive computer expertise to help students in classroom.” The nomination states he teaches courses in physical organic chemistry and spectroscopy and a special topics course in photochemistry was carried by the Internet to students at Columbia University and the University of Miami. He also has initiated the Parents Involvement with Children Nurturing Intellectual Curiosity in Science, a collaborative program involving students, parents, high school teachers and NDSU chemistry faculty.

“Dr. Jayaraman has continued to push the boundaries of Internet connectivity by expanding his experience from the class to a new ‘literature literacy’ project connecting students and research labs at four universities to hold super group meetings,” the nomination letter said. The participating institutions include Columbia University, University of Miami, UCLA and Brown University.

Jayaraman, who came to NDSU in 2006, earned his bachelor’s degree at Bharathidasan University, St. Joseph’s College in Trichy, India; his master’s degree in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; and his doctorate in chemistry from Tulane University, New Orleans. He also was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University, New York.

Ergologistics, NDSU Technology Incubator Start-up, Named Finalist for National Award I 2/21/2012

February 21, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Ergologistics, a start-up company at the NDSU Research and Technology Park’s Technology Incubator, has been named a finalist for the 2012 Edison Best New Product Awards in the industrial design category. Ergologistics, which manufactures products to reduce wear and tear on the bodies of workers who lift and carry materials, was nominated for its Lift'n Buddy mobile lifting device.

"I am extremely pleased to be a finalist for the 2012 Edison Awards in the category of industrial design,” said Aaron Lamb, president of Ergologistics. “This honor solidifies Lift'n Buddy's place in the market. Being in the field of this year’s finalists speaks well to the level of innovation we strive for. I am excited for our company, and our extended family at the NDSU Research and Technology Park’s Technology Incubator that helped to bring our product to market."

Along with Lift’n Buddy, other tool finalists in the industrial design category are a Kobalt 19-piece double-drive screwdriver set and a slice box cutter. Household-product-finalists in the industrial design category include a Dyson hot fan heater, TikTok + LunaTik and WordLock.

“This nomination is truly an honor for Aaron and his team,” said Brenda Wyland, associate director for the NDSU Research and Technology Park. “The finalists for this internationally renowned distinction represent the best of the best in today’s cutting edge innovation and design.”

The Edison Awards, which have been in existence for 25 years, recognize innovative products, services and business leaders. The awards are named after Thomas Alva Edison whose product development methods and innovation garnered him more than 1,000 U.S. patents and made him a household name.

The panel of judges for the Edison Best New Product Awards include more than 3,000 top marketing professionals and academics as well as professionals from the fields of product development and design, engineering, science and education. Evaluation criteria focus on concept, value, impact and delivery.

The NDSU Research and Technology Park and Technology Incubator are home to fast-paced, high-growth companies that promote technology-based economic development in North Dakota. Each of them has the potential to compete globally or is already doing so effectively. To operate within the park or Technology Incubator, a company must be involved in the advancement and development of new technology, be willing to establish a working relationship with NDSU and work in one or more of the following technology fields: material sciences, biosciences and life science technology, information technology, nanotechnology, advanced manufacturing and sensors/micro-electronics.
 

Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute Staff Present Research I 2/17/2012

February 17, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several staff members from NDSU’s Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute participated in the Transportation Research Board’s national meeting in Washington, D.C., Jan. 22-26.

The meeting attracted more than 11,000 transportation professionals from around the world and included more than 4,000 presentations in nearly 650 sessions and workshops covering all modes of transportation. The Transportation Research Board is one of the six major divisions of the National Research Council. Institute staff members presented the following research papers:

“Analyzing Investments Needed to Support Oil and Gas Production and Distribution,” NDSU associate director Denver Tolliver – The paper described a study to forecast road investment needs in the oil and gas producing counties of North Dakota during the next 20 years in light of the expected growth. The study focused on roads owned or maintained by local governments. Co-authors were associate research fellow Alan Dybing and former researcher Subhro Mitra.

“County Road Survey for Transportation Managers,” Kimberly Vachal, director of the institute’s Rural Transportation Safety and Security Center – The paper detailed a survey of North Dakota county road managers regarding safety practices, training and resources. Responses establish a benchmark for understanding common practices and opportunities to promote safety on the state’s rural roads. Co-authors included associate research fellow Mark Berwick and Jason Baker, formerly of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute.

“Using Laws, Enforcement, and Sanctions to Increase Seat Belt Use on Rural Roads,” also presented by Vachal – The paper described a review of enforcement and crash data from rural roads in 32 states. Findings will be useful in promoting more efficient seat belt interventions for rural areas based on alignment with state and local driver characteristics. Co-authors include institute researchers Donald Malchose and Laurel Benson.

“Predicting Truck Crash Involvement: Commercial Driver Behavior-Based Model,” Brenda Lantz, director of the institute’s Transportation Safety Systems Center – The paper outlined research to identify truck driver behaviors that are significant predictors of future crashes. Co-author of the paper was Micah David Lueck of the American Transportation Research Institute. Lantz also chaired a meeting of the Transportation Research Institute’s Truck and Bus Data Subcommittee.

“Marginal Cos Pricing and Subsidy of Small Urban Transit,” associate research fellow Jeremy Mattson – The study analyzes economies of scale and density as a rationale for subsidizing transit agencies in small urban areas. The rationale for subsidies is an important issue as many agencies have experienced recent reductions in operational funding. David Ripplinger, formerly of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute and now with the NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, was a co-author.

“Transportation and Health Care Use for Older Adults in Small Communities,” also presented by Mattson as an invited paper – The study estimated the impacts of transportation and travel distance on utilization of health care services for older adults in rural and small urban areas.

“Application of Attitudinal Structural Equation Modeling to Intercity Transportation Market Segmentation,” presented by Mattson – The paper describes research, focused on rural and small urban areas that used modeling techniques to predict various transportation mode shares based on factors such as socioeconomic characteristics and attitudes toward travel time, flexibility and privacy. Co-authors include Ripplinger and associate research fellow Del Peterson.

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Paper on Pancreatic Tumor Regulator I 2/17/2012

February 17, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, co-wrote the review article, “The paracrine Sonic Hedgehog signaling derived from tumor epithelial cells: A key regulator in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment,” which has been accepted by Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression.

According to the authors, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in embryo development and tumorigenesis. While normal pancreatic tissue exhibits little Hedgehog pathway activity, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma have high levels of Hedgehog pathway signaling in both the tumor epithelia and the surrounding stromal tissue. Hedgehog ligands expressed by pancreatic cancers promote tumor growth indirectly by activating Hedgehog signaling in the surrounding stroma. This paracrine activation of Hedgehog signaling in the tumor microenvironment provides a more favorable environment for tumor cellular proliferation, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Taken together, these findings are of valuable implications for the use of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors currently in development and inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway paracrine loop in pancreatic cancer.  

“In this review article, we comprehensively describe that the ability of tumor cell-derived Sonic Hedgehog to act in a paracrine role on the surrounding stroma cells provides a rational explanation to the daunting results of the past studies. Due to the rapid advancement of our understanding of this paracrine phenomenon, future novel therapeutic strategies will be developed and proven to be effective in the treatment of pancreatic cancer,” Wu said. The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.

The journal Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression presents timely concepts and experimental approaches that are contributing to rapid advances in our mechanistic understanding of gene regulation, organization and structure within the contexts of biological control and the diagnosis/treatment of disease. The journal provides critical reviews, on well-defined topics of immediate interest, written by recognized specialists in the field.

www.begellhouse.com/journals/6dbf508d3b17c437
 

NDSU Researchers Contribute to Molecular Biology Book I 2/17/2012

February 17, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Several NDSU researchers wrote chapters for “Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols,” Methods in Molecular Biology 835 in the Springer Protocols series. Javier A. Delgado, Timothy L. Friesen, Rubella Goswami, Yueqiang Leng, Zhaohui Liu, Samuel G. Markell, Steven Meinhardt, Jayma A. Moore, Scott A. Payne, Viviana V. Rivera, Gary A. Secor and Shaobin Zhong, all associated with the Department of Plant Pathology, contributed to the book.

The book was published by Humana Press and edited by Melvin D. Bolton of the USDA-ARS Northern Crops Science Laboratory in Fargo and Bart P.H.J. Thomma, Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

Payne and Moore of the Electron Microscopy Center also provided the cover illustration of the fungus Cercospora beticola infecting a sugarbeet leaf. 

ND Centers of Excellence Commission Approves Two New Centers of Research Excellence at NDSU I 2/15/2012

February 15, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – The North Dakota Centers of Excellence Commission has approved $1.67 million to fund two new Centers of Research Excellence at North Dakota State University, Fargo.  NDSU will receive $1.35 million to develop a new Center of Research Excellence (CORE) called the Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications. Based at NDSU, the Center will conduct life sciences research with private partners, including Sanford Research and the RJ Lee Group, Inc. The Centers of Excellence Commission also approved $320,000 to establish the Center for Technologically Innovative Products and Processes (CTIPP) at NDSU. Initially, the CTIPP will partner with industrial companies such as Mid-America Aviation, Amity Technology, and Arkema, Inc., assisting with product research, testing, evaluation and analysis.

“These two new research centers are promising economic development projects for the state of North Dakota,” North Dakota Commerce Commissioner, Al Anderson, said. “Centers of Research Excellence projects help us leverage the talent and research expertise that exists in our state.”

ABOUT THE NEW NDSU CENTER FOR LIFE SCIENCES RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS (CLS)

Sanford Research, headquartered in Sioux Falls, S.D., and Fargo, N.D., plans to partner with the new Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications at NDSU for research on human genomics and bioinformatics. Initial focus is expected to include breast cancer research and research into certain rare diseases in children.

Sanford Research and RJ Lee have committed to contribute cash and in-kind contributions totaling $2.7 million to the Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications over a period of more than four years.

“Sanford Research is pleased to partner with NDSU in this important health research initiative,” Ruth Krystopolski, executive vice president of development & research, Sanford Health said. “We share the belief in and enthusiasm for the application of genomic information toward novel clinical trials, next-generation therapies and cures. Already, advances in clinical genomics have enhanced translational research activities in type 1 diabetes, breast cancer and child-hood rare diseases among other disciplines at Sanford Research. This project will allow for an even greater level of integration between scientific discovery and the doctor's office, and most importantly, improve care for the patients we serve in our region.”

In addition, the RJ Lee Group, Inc., a major supplier of industrial forensic capabilities, plans to work with the Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications at NDSU and the NDSU DNA Laboratory to develop next generation DNA-based identification and forensic tests and methods. Based in Monroeville, Penn., the group was founded by North Dakota native, Richard J. Lee.

The goal of the Center for Life Sciences Research and Applications is to combine the resources and capabilities of multiple private sector partners interested in the life sciences, with NDSU’s research and development capabilities for life science-related technology or product development.

“These Centers will be a significant addition to NDSU’s research efforts benefiting our state’s economy, while leading to opportunities for students, both in their studies and in their future careers. The Centers provide technology-based economic stimulation that can only come from the comingling of research university and business development activities,” said NDSU President Dean Bresciani.

“NDSU’s involvement in these exceptional research partnerships will involve graduate and undergraduate students participating in research activities by the Center and its partners. In parallel with this CORE effort, NDSU also plans to offer additional opportunities for postgraduate studies and research in genetics and bioinformatics,” said Bruce Rafert, NDSU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

"This new Center builds upon NDSU’s expertise in robotics, computational sciences and informatics. It can also serve as another catalyst in the burgeoning life sciences industry cluster in the Red River Valley, further contributing to technology-based economic development,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research at NDSU.

The Center will initially focus on discoveries and technologies generated by NDSU and private sector partners which has the potential to:
-Encourage growth of the life sciences industry sector in North Dakota and promote technology-based economic development
-Spur growth of computational research and sciences, particularly in bioinformatics,
-Spur growth of genomics research, and
-Spur growth of DNA-based forensics and identification research and applications

Genomics involves studying the function and interactions of all genes in the genome. Such research can involve humans, plants or animals. In the case of human genomics, researchers use biological roadmaps to find which genes might be involved in diseases such as cancer. In the case of plants, it might be which genes play a role in crop disease and performance. In the case of animals, genomics research can lead to a better understanding of disease resistance and susceptibility.

Vast amounts of scientific data are generated in the study of genomics. Bioinformatics uses computational technologies to manage and analyze all the research information that is generated. Computer technology can be used to uncover information hidden in large masses of data, helping to better diagnose and treat diseases in humans, plants and animals.

ABOUT THE NEW NDSU CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGICALLY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (CTIPP)

This new Center at NDSU stems from requests from private sector partners of existing NDSU Centers of Excellence to engage in commercially-relevant research projects involving the entire product supply chain, including:  material design and selection, researching process improvements, testing and evaluating product prototypes, analyzing product failure, and research to improve products. The Center will focus on market-driven research to enhance products, reduce production costs, and improve processes.

Center partners will utilize NDSU’s expertise in such areas as materials characterization, corrosion research, chemistry and engineering. Another goal of the program is to promote the use of technological developments that have a cost effective, but positive environmental effect in the energy industrial cluster in the western part of the state.

Initial partners in this new Center of Research Excellence at NDSU include:  Mid-America Aviation, a leader in the aerospace industry based in West Fargo, N.D., Amity Technology, a leader in agricultural equipment applications, in Fargo, N.D., and Arkema, Inc., a global producer of industrial chemicals, performance products and vinyl products, based in King of Prussia, Pa., that is developing products to better serve the needs wind-based energy production, a growing energy segment in North Dakota.

The three initial private sector partners have committed cash and in-kind match contributions totaling $640,000 for the new research Center.

“The Center of Research Excellence program will provide substantial benefit to Mid-America Aviation by enabling us to leverage the great facilities and personnel at North Dakota State University to provide research support for our development of new overhaul and manufacturing technologies,” said Randall D. Herman, chief operating officer, Mid-America Aviation, West Fargo, N.D.  “This partnership with the state of North Dakota, North Dakota State University, and Mid-America Aviation represents the best possible utilization of public and private resources to enhance business opportunities in our region, to grow our business, and to provide better employment opportunities to our workforce.”

CTIPP will also enable NDSU students to participate in industrially relevant research. “This new industrial research Center offers opportunities for both industry and students,” said Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research at NDSU. “It will conduct commercially-relevant research driven by the market, helping companies solve product supply chain problems, while giving students substantial research experience in this business sector.”

The new Center will work with industrial partners from the beginning of the industrial supply chain through to finished products.

NDSU Students Win Bronze in Basketball / Physics Competition I 2/8/2012

February 8, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Three physics students at North Dakota State University, Fargo, have received the equivalent of a bronze medal in the international University Physics Competition.  The students had just 48 hours to solve a physics problem involving three-point shooting in Olympic basketball, using math and physics to determine what initial ball velocities and spins will result in a successful shot from the three-point line, using international basketball rules. Senior physics majors Marne Johnson from Rugby, N.D., and Brandon Johnson, from Hazen, N.D., along with Ahis Shrestha, a junior in physics and math from Nepal, dedicated a weekend to crunching numbers and formulating calculations for the contest.

It is the first time NDSU students have participated in the competition since it began two years ago. During the contest, students work in teams of three at their home colleges and universities all over the world, analyzing a real-world scenario using the principles of physics and submitting a formal paper about their work. Everything is done over a 48-hour period. Dr. Sylvio May, associate professor of physics at NDSU, said the competition was a good fit, since the problem was an application of classical mechanics, a class which all three of the students studied in fall semester. “I hope they like the intellectual challenge and the opportunity to work as a team on a problem that has no simple solution,” said May.

The students say the competition benefited them in different ways. “I was surprised by the amount of heavy computation that can go into something as simple and intuitive as throwing a basketball,” said Brandon Johnson. “I chose to partake in the competition because I wanted to test my current knowledge against a real life application. Through the competition, I learned some of the value of teamwork in physics,” he said. “The time limit was intense, to say the least.”

Senior Marne Johnson said she participated because the competition sounded fun and challenging. “I would be working with classmates I knew and trusted, and it would be good exposure to real-life physics problems. I was surprised by the difficulty we experienced mathematically modeling a moving projectile,” said Marne. “Physics such as this in such a short time window is stressful but exciting, because you know you have a deadline to meet.” It gave students useful lessons in time management. “I also received an extremely abbreviated lesson in typesetting and graphing in Mathematica®.” Marne had never before used the powerful software program for complex calculations. “But it is the best program out there for writing physics and math papers, so learn I did.”

Junior Ahis Shrestha found the crash course in solving physics problems useful as well. “I am usually a pen-and-paper person but because of the limited time, we had to use Wolfram Mathematica® for faster calculations and, as a result, I ended up learning the convenience of computational methods while solving a problem,” said Ahis. “Of course, this was possible with the help and cooperation of Brandon and Marne.”

The students spent most of a weekend in November doing calculations, covering everything from a three-point shot with nothing but net, to rim shot, bank shot, spin or no spin on the ball.

While basketball is either a spectator or a participant sport, few people realize that shooting a basketball is all about physics. Gravity, a projectile moving through a fluid medium (air), whether the ball touches the rim or backboard, if there’s spin on the ball, or the range of horizontal and vertical angles—all factors that determine whether the shot is successful.

So the next time your favorite basketball player lines up for that three-point shot to win the game, remember, it’s all about physics.

The NDSU physics team was among 77 teams from around the world, including China, Singapore, Mexico and the United Kingdom, that competed in the challenge. Of those competing, 3 percent of the teams were ranked as Gold Medal Winners, 18 percent were ranked as Silver Medal Winners, and 27 percent were ranked as Bronze Medal Winners for their work. The American Physical Society and the American Astronomical Society sponsored the competition.

The three NDSU students don’t think their fascination with physics will end anytime soon. “Most behavior that we observe in the physical world can be described in terms of physics, whether it may be shooting a basketball, launching a rocket, ripples on a lake, motion of a planet, etc.,” said Ahis. Both Marne and Brandon plan to attend graduate school and Ahis also plans to pursue graduate studies in mathematical physics and work on scientific research.

Information about the University Physics Competition is available at http://www.uphysicsc.com

Antennaless RFID Tags Developed at NDSU Solve Problem of Tracking Metal and Liquids I 2/2/2012

February 2, 2012 – Fargo, N.D. – Tracking and identifying metal objects can prove difficult for some radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. A patent-pending technology developed by a research team at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at North Dakota State University, Fargo, could solve these RFID tracking problems. The antennaless RFID tag developed at CNSE could help companies track products as varied as barrels of oil to metal cargo containers.

A typical RFID tag is made up of an integrated circuit (IC) and an antenna. While there are different types of tags available, many don’t work well on metal objects or on containers filled with liquid. Previous attempts to solve this problem have resulted in bulky tags that are easily destroyed by routine handling. Researchers at the NDSU Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering have developed a patent-pending novel approach, with an antennaless RFID tag, allowing for an inexpensive and manufacturable product tracking solution that meets EPCglobal® Standards.

The CNSE research team includes Cherish Bauer-Reich, research engineer; Dr. Michael Reich, senior research engineer; and undergraduate electrical engineering student Layne Berge. The group’s research will be presented at the 2012 IEEE International Workshop on Antenna Technology (iWAT-2012) to be held March 5-7, in Tucson, Ariz., with presenters from more than 15 countries expected to participate in the event. The research presentation titled “Low-profile, high-permeability antennaless RFID tags for use on metal objects” is scheduled for March 5.

“Most RFID tags that are to be used on metal objects are made by placing an antenna on a spacer, making them between 0.5 and 3 cm thick, depending on the type of tag,” said Cherish Bauer-Reich, research engineer. Such tags can be easily damaged because they stick out so far.  The tags developed by NDSU CNSE are less than 3 mm thick and are placed directly on the metal, or could be recessed into the surface of a metal container.

“The tags we’ve developed actually use the metal container as an antenna, rather than having to make and place another antenna on top of the container,” said Bauer-Reich. “Many types of tags have to be spaced away from metal, since it changes the electromagnetic fields around the tags and destroys their ability to communicate. These tags, however, use the metal container as the antenna to transmit information. Because of this unique property, these tags can be used to tag anything from coffee cans at a grocery store to barrels of oil or metal cargo containers, with minimal concern about losing or damaging the tag.”

High-permeability materials divert current into the tag’s integrated circuit. Tags using high-permeability materials in such a way are significantly thinner than those developed using other methods.  

The antennaless RFID tag technology developed at NDSU CNSE was developed with support under Grant Number N00189-10-C-Z055, awarded by the U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Naval Research.

The patent-pending technology is available for licensing/partnering opportunities through the NDSU Research Foundation.
http://www.ndsuresearchfoundation.org/rft375

About NDSU CNSE
NDSU’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, conducts multidisciplinary research with partners in government, industry, private and university sectors. CNSE’s scientific capabilities include flexible electronics and materials, electronics miniaturization, wireless sensors, RFID, bioactive materials, combinatorial science, and coatings technologies. www.ndsu.edu/cnse

About iWAT-2012
The International Workshop on Antenna Technology (iWAT) is an annual IEEE forum for the exchange of information on the-state-of-the-art in innovative antenna technologies. The Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) iWAT-2012 is scheduled for March 5-7 in Tucson, Ariz. www.certain.com/system/profile/web/index.cfm?PKWebId=0x2789402711

About North Dakota State University
North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects.  www.ndsu.edu/research

Novel Dental Implant Wins NDSU’s Innovation Challenge ’12 I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Bison M-Venture, a team of 15 NDSU students, won first place and $5,000 for their novel dental implant in the Innovation Challenge ’12 competition Jan. 26. The team is developing a porous ceramic dental implant for people who cannot use traditional titanium implants. Because the implant is made from a type of inexpensive ceramic that has bone-like properties, it has the potential to reduce rejection rates, help patients heal faster, be more cost-effective and change using titanium as the standard material in dental implants and other biomedical devices.

“With this funding, we can pump out more data and research to take this project to the next level,” said team captain Erica Pfarr, a senior biochemistry and molecular biology major from Rochester, Minn. “The next step will be writing a grant proposal to make this idea into an option for those seeking a dental implant.”

The team includes student engineers who build the implants and student scientists who grow cells on the implants and analyze that growth. Other team members are junior Derek Holt, manufacturing engineering major from Fargo; senior Cody Mathison, manufacturing engineering major from Mora, Minn.; junior Deanna Webster, zoology major from Penn., N.D.; sophomore Danielle Stromme, zoology major from Crary, N.D.; senior Tyler Johnson, biology major from Bismarck, N.D.; sophomore Shelby Schields, zoology major from Beulah, N.D.; junior David Sundquist, mechanical engineering major from Cottage Grove, Minn.; sophomore Andrew Dalman, mechanical engineering major from Minneapolis; sophomore Lucas Budzien, mechanical engineering major from Blaine, Minn.; senior Austin Vetter, zoology major from Minot, N.D.; senior Brittany Korynta, horticulture major from Gilby, N.D.; sophomore Joel Hedlof, mechanical engineering major from Willmar, Minn.; senior Brittany Gagner, zoology major from Fergus Falls, Minn.; and senior Derek Hiam, zoology major from Lisbon, N.D.

The Aphasia Therapy team, which includes senior Trisha McDonald, university studies major from West Fargo, N.D., and senior Amanda Beller, psychology major from Morganville, N.J., won second place and $2,500. McDonald and Beller’s project is therapy for people who have aphasia, an acquired communication disorder that impairs a person’s ability to process language. The therapy includes a collection of software that uses word recall and association, audiovisual matching and complex sentence patterns to help rehabilitate people who have lost complex language skills.

The CPM team, which includes Rajan Bodkhe from Amravati, India, and Chavanin Siripirom from Bangkok, Thailand, won third place and $1,000. Their project is a coating system to prevent the growth of marine organisms on ship hulls. This growth, known as biofouling, causes speed reduction, loss of maneuverability, as well as increased fuel consumption, pollution, dry-docking frequency and voyage time. Bodkhe and Siripirom are both graduate students in coatings and polymeric materials.

The Innovation Challenge ’12 was a new component of the third annual Innovation Week held by NDSU and the NDSU Research and Technology Park. “The success of the first Innovation Challenge ’12 competition is due to the very bright and talented NDSU students who participated in the event,” said Tony Grindberg, executive director of the NDSU Research and Technology Park. “The caliber of projects was outstanding and truly reflects the first-class research and innovative work being done on campus and in the park.”

Judges were Tom Walter of Tasty Catering, John Cosgriff of Invest America, Rick Kasper of MinnDak Farmers Cooperative, Carol Schlossman of Insight to Action, Arjan Giaya of Triton Systems, Andrew Christensen of Arthur Ventures, Joe Sandin of OnSharp and Bob Allen of Appareo Systems.

NDSU Faculty Collaborate with Alumnus on Food Safety Research I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Five researchers from NDSU’s Departments of Civil Engineering and Biological Sciences have been awarded a three-year, $500,000 research grant by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The project, titled “Life-cycle Approaches to Understand the Interactions Between Crops and Engineered Nanoparticles at Molecular Level,” also has an NDSU alumnus as a collaborator.

Achintya Bezbaruah (principal investigator), Dinesh Katti and Kalpana Katti from NDSU civil engineering; Marinus Otte and Donna Jacob from biological sciences; and NDSU alumnus Jose Gonzalez from South Dakota State University will conduct collaborative research to understand the molecular level interactions of two specific engineered nanoparticles (ENPs, zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes) with crop plants through in-vivo, in-vitro, genetic, genomic and molecular modeling experiments, and relate the information to food security.

The growth in applications of ENPs in areas such as cosmetics, electronics, drugs and other biomedical applications and the subsequent release of ENPs into the environment and their potential impact on plants were the motivation for the proposed research. The project will improve understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant uptake of ENPs and their fate and transport within the plants.

The main focus of the research will be on spinach. Uptake and translocation of nanoparticles in rice also will be studied. An important goal of the project is to assess if ENPs affect DNA in the plants because of molecular interactions between nanoparticles and plant tissues. The research will help in assessing the threats to food security from ENPs and in developing methods to prevent negative impacts of such nanoparticles.

NDSU’s civil engineering department has a strong research emphasis on environmental nanotechnology and has been successful in pursuing federal grants in recent years. The research team’s strength in plant and microorganism interactions with engineered nanoparticles, nanomaterials, biomolecular modeling, material characterization and genomics helped them to be among the five to seven research projects supported this year from among the 101 research proposals submitted to NIFA’s priority area of physical and molecular mechanisms of food contamination.

NDSU Associate Professor Receives Young Investigator Award I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Sivaguru (Siva) Jayaraman, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at NDSU, received the 2011 Young Investigator Award from the Inter-American Photochemical Society. The award will be presented at the society’s 2013 meeting. The Young Investigator Award was established in 2002 to recognize outstanding photoscientific contributions by society members who have held an independent research position for no more than five years at the time of application.

Jayaraman’s research focus is in the area of photochemistry, supramolecular chemistry and organo- and supramolecular photocatalysis and light driven sustainable chemistry. He has received numerous awards, including the 2008 National Science Foundation CAREER award and 2010 Grammaticakis-Neumann Prize from the Swiss Chemical Society.

At NDSU, Jayaraman received the 2010 Excellence in Research Award and 2011 Excellence in Teaching Award. He joined the faculty at NDSU in 2006. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University, New York, after earning his doctorate from Tulane University, New Orleans. He earned a master’s degree in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology,
Madras, India, and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from St. Joseph’s College, Trichy, India.

NDSU to Participate in National Transportation Center Grants I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU is a part of two U.S. Department of Transportation competitive grants awarded this month. The grants, each for about $3.5 million, were among only 22 awarded across the country in the University Transportation Centers Program administered by the DOT’s Research and Innovative Technology Administration. Funding from the grants will support work at NDSU’s Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute.

“These grants represent significant support for our work at the Transportation Institute,” said Denver Tolliver, the institute’s associate director. “With the high expectations that come with these awards, there is also a recognition that the work we do at NDSU and with our collaborators has established a foundation for future success.”

“Efficient and safe mobility is critical to North Dakota and the region,” NDSU Provost Bruce Rafert said. “As NDSU continues to build its capacity for high-quality teaching, research and outreach, transportation will continue to be an important part of our overall program.”

One grant is for an NDSU-led collaborative program called the Mountain-Plains Consortium involving eight universities across the Upper Great Plains and Intermountain West. Efforts will range from development of techniques to extend the life of bridges to improved transportation planning for Indian reservations to improved road safety. Partners with NDSU include Colorado State University, South Dakota State University, University of Colorado-Denver, University of Denver, University of Utah, University of Wyoming and Utah State University. NDSU’s share will be about $1.3 million.

The second grant was one of only two awarded nationally to focus specifically on public transportation. NDSU is a partner with the University of Illinois at Chicago and Florida International University in Miami. The University of South Florida in Tampa will lead the effort. The Small Urban and Rural Transit Center, a part of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute at NDSU, will provide expertise in rural and small urban transportation. NDSU will receive about $700,000 from the grant.

NDSU has led the Mountain-Plains Consortium since 1988, successfully competing three times since then for the designation as a federally funded University Transportation Center. The program has generated a library of more than 200 research publications and has helped establish the successful transportation and logistics graduate program at NDSU. The consortium also has established itself as a leader in using technology for training and outreach.

The Small Urban and Rural Transit Center was established at NDSU in 2002 and has developed nationally recognized programs in rural and small urban transit. Researchers have conducted unique research on transit coordination, mobility needs of elderly in rural areas, use of technology by rural small transit agencies and other topics. Training and outreach by center staff include topics as diverse as transit agency management, tribal transit management, risk management and customer service with staff members conducting nearly 30 training courses in 17 different states during the past year.

NDSU Faculty Member Invited to Present at Sanford Research I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, recently was invited to present his research at Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, S.D. During the two-day visit, Wu met one-on-one or in groups with faculty at the Cancer Research Center, Children’s Health Research Center and Cardiovascular Health Research Center at Sanford Research. Wu also presented a seminar titled “Cancer Therapeutics: Target and Drug Discovery.” One example he discussed is platelet-derived growth factor receptors as therapeutics targets in metastatic medulloblastoma and cambogin, a newly discovered platelet-derived growth factor receptors’ inhibitor from his group.

According to its website, Sanford Research is a nonprofit research organization formed between Sanford Health and the University of South Dakota. Sanford Research is composed of several research centers including Cancer Biology, Cardiovascular Health, Health Disparities, Methodology and Data Analysis, Sanford Children’s Health and the Sanford Project.

NDSU Researchers Contribute to Molecular Biology Book I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Several NDSU researchers wrote chapters for “Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols,” Methods in Molecular Biology 835 in the Springer Protocols series. Javier A. Delgado, Timothy L. Friesen, Rubella Goswami, Yueqiang Leng, Zhaohui Liu, Samuel G. Markell, Steven Meinhardt, Jayma A. Moore, Scott A. Payne, Viviana V. Rivera, Gary A. Secor and Shaobin Zhong, all associated with the Department of Plant Pathology at NDSU, contributed to the book.

The book was published by Humana Press and edited by Melvin D. Bolton of the USDA-ARS Northern Crops Science Laboratory in Fargo and Bart P.H.J. Thomma, Wageningen University, The Netherlands. Payne and Moore of the Electron Microscopy Center also provided the cover illustration of the fungus Cercospora beticola infecting a sugarbeet leaf.

NDSU Assistant Professor Publishes Paper I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU, co-wrote the review article, “The paracrine Sonic Hedgehog signaling derived from tumor epithelial cells: A key regulator in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment,” which has been accepted by Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression.

According to the authors, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in embryo development and tumorigenesis. While normal pancreatic tissue exhibits little Hedgehog pathway activity, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma have high levels of Hedgehog pathway signaling in both the tumor epithelia and the surrounding stromal tissue. Hedgehog ligands expressed by pancreatic cancers promote tumor growth indirectly by activating Hedgehog signaling in the surrounding stroma. This paracrine activation of Hedgehog signaling in the tumor microenvironment provides a more favorable environment for tumor cellular proliferation, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Taken together, these findings are of valuable implications for the use of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors currently in development and inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway paracrine loop in pancreatic cancer.

The paper was co-written with Qingyong Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.  The journal Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression presents timely concepts and experimental approaches that are contributing to rapid advances in our mechanistic understanding of gene regulation, organization and structure within the contexts of biological control and the diagnosis/treatment of disease. The journal provides critical reviews, on well-defined topics of immediate interest, written by recognized specialists in the field.

Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute Staff Present Research I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Several staff members from NDSU’s Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute participated in the Transportation Research Board’s national meeting in Washington, D.C., Jan. 22-26. The meeting attracted more than 11,000 transportation professionals from around the world and included more than 4,000 presentations in nearly 650 sessions and workshops covering all modes of transportation.

Institute staff members presented the following research papers: “Analyzing Investments Needed to Support Oil and Gas Production and Distribution,” NDSU associate director Denver Tolliver – The paper described a study to forecast road investment needs in the oil and gas producing counties of North Dakota during the next 20 years in light of the expected growth. The study focused on roads owned or maintained by local governments. Co-authors were associate research fellow Alan Dybing and former researcher Subhro Mitra.

“County Road Survey for Transportation Managers,” Kimberly Vachal, director of the institute’s Rural Transportation Safety and Security Center – The paper detailed a survey of North Dakota county road managers regarding safety practices, training and resources. Responses establish a benchmark for understanding common practices and opportunities to promote safety on the state’s rural roads. Co-authors included associate research fellow Mark Berwick and Jason Baker, formerly of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute.

“Using Laws, Enforcement, and Sanctions to Increase Seat Belt Use on Rural Roads,” also presented by Vachal – The paper described a review of enforcement and crash data from rural roads in 32 states. Findings will be useful in promoting more efficient seat belt interventions for rural areas based on alignment with state and local driver characteristics. Co-authors include institute researchers Donald Malchose and Laurel Benson.

“Predicting Truck Crash Involvement: Commercial Driver Behavior-Based Model,” Brenda Lantz, director of the institute’s Transportation Safety Systems Center – The paper outlined research to identify truck driver behaviors that are significant predictors of future crashes. Co-author of the paper was Micah David Lueck of the American Transportation Research Institute. Lantz also chaired a meeting of the Transportation Research Institute’s Truck and Bus Data Subcommittee.

“Marginal Cos Pricing and Subsidy of Small Urban Transit,” associate research fellow Jeremy Mattson – The study analyzes economies of scale and density as a rationale for subsidizing transit agencies in small urban areas. The rationale for subsidies is an important issue as many agencies have experienced recent reductions in operational funding. David Ripplinger, formerly of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute and now with the NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, was a co-author.

“Transportation and Health Care Use for Older Adults in Small Communities,” also presented by Mattson as an invited paper – The study estimated the impacts of transportation and travel distance on utilization of health care services for older adults in rural and small urban areas.

“Application of Attitudinal Structural Equation Modeling to Intercity Transportation Market Segmentation,” presented by Mattson – The paper describes research, focused on rural and small urban areas that used modeling techniques to predict various transportation mode shares based on factors such as socioeconomic characteristics and attitudes toward travel time, flexibility and privacy. Co-authors include Ripplinger and associate research fellow Del Peterson.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Present and Publish I 1/31/2012

January 31, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Kevin Miller, assistant professor of athletic training at NDSU, was recently interviewed by National Geographic magazine. The front-page article, to be published April 2012, will discuss Miller’s research on cramping and pickle juice’s effects on the body. National Geographic is the world’s second-largest English-language magazine with more than 6 million readers per issue.

Denise Lajimodiere, assistant professor of education at NDSU, was an invited presenter at the US Human Rights Network’s National Human Rights Conference held recently in Los Angeles. She presented her research on Native American boarding school survivors, which were instrumental in documenting human rights abuses at the schools.

Brent Young, assistant professor of agricultural and Extension education, published a paper titled “A Profile of Secondary Teachers and Schools in North Dakota: Implications for the Student Teaching Experience in Agricultural Education” in the Journal of Career and Technical Education. The study was an inquiry of secondary teachers’ perceptions of the agricultural education student teaching experience in North Dakota.

Heather Fuller-Iglesias, assistant professor of human development and family science at NDSU, and her co-author, Toni Antonucci from the University of Michigan, presented a paper titled “Social Support as a Mediator Between Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Mexican Adults” at the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America held in November in Boston.

Elizabeth Erichsen, assistant professor of education at NDSU, in collaboration with Eric Canen of the Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center (WYSAC) at the University of Wyoming, was awarded a contract with the North Dakota Department of Human Services for the evaluation of the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant. The grant is federally funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, which is aimed at helping states build the infrastructure and capacity for alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) prevention programming. The five-year, $240,000 per annum NDSU and WYSAC joint evaluation project will focus on analyzing streams of state data and state- and community-level needs and progress assessments to evaluate the impact of the grant on ATOD prevention strategies in North Dakota, focusing specifically on underage alcohol usage and adult binge drinking.

Erichsen, with NDSU doctoral students Rosalinda Connelley, Christine Okurut-Ibore, Lyn DeLorme, Lisa McNamara and Obaidalah Aljohani, recently presented the paper “A Sociotechnical Systems Approach to a Blended Doctoral Program: An Action Research Project” at the Northern Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association’s annual meeting in Jackson Hole, Wyo. Erichsen also presented the paper “A Comparative Content Analysis of Adult and Continuing Education Handbooks from Germany and the United States” at the Commission of Professors of Adult Education conference in Indianapolis. She and Claudette Peterson also co-presented work with Chris Ray, Nate Wood and Myron Eighmy titled “Re-Visioning an Adult Education Doctoral Program Part I: Generating a Framework and Articulating Our Mission, Vision and Values,” and “Re-Visioning the Doctoral Process–Part II: Aligning Curriculum to CPAE Standards and Developing Scholarly Disposition.”

Abby Gold, assistant professor and Extension specialist in health, nutrition and exercise science, and Department of Communication Assistant Professors Nan Yu and Elizabeth Crawford have collaborated on a research project investigating overweight children and radio commercial messages. The study, titled “Childhood Overweight: Effects of Informational and Narrative Radio Messages on Parents of Children and Teenagers,” has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Health and Mass Communication. The study was designed to serve the welfare of a community in which overweight childhoods have been a longtime concern.

NDSU Associate Professor Researches How North Dakota Crops Can Be Used by Food Manufacturers I 1/30/2012

January 30, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — If you have ever been curious about where the idea for your breakfast cereal or snack food originated, it may have been in a lab like the one at Harris Hall where Clifford Hall conducts his research.

Hall, associate professor in the School of Food Systems and interim technical director of the Northern Crops Institute, researches how North Dakota crops, such as beans, peas and flax, can be used in nontraditional ways. 

Grinding dried beans, puffing them and coating them with cheese, for example, produces a food similar to Cheetos, which are made from corn, he explained. And protein from peas can replace eggs in baked goods such as cakes, cookies and muffins. “Most people don’t think of peas and eggs functioning the same way, but they can in baking applications,” Hall said. 

The advantage of using dried beans in snack food is the high fiber, micronutrient and protein content that starchy snacks lack, Hall said. He sees commercial potential for bean-based snacks in Southeast Asia where consumers prefer natural foods. “Products made from beans and peas are of interest because these commodities are currently produced using traditional agricultural methods,” Hall said.

People who have egg allergies and vegans are possible consumers for products that replace eggs with pea protein. If a product doesn’t contain eggs, the food manufacturer can leave the egg allergen warning off the food label, Hall said. Pea protein is also less expensive than eggs. 

But does pea-protein cake taste good? “The sensory evaluations have been positive,” Hall said. “They are comparable to egg cake.” In November 2011, Hall invited people on campus to taste test cookies and cake made with the pea protein instead of eggs. In physical measurements, products made from eggs fared better; however, taste testers liked the baked goods made from pea protein more than the cakes made with eggs. “The moist texture was one reason why panelists liked the cakes containing pea protein,” Hall said.

Hall, who has a sensitivity to eggs, uses pea protein in his own kitchen for pancakes, waffles and muffins. “I’m a guinea pig to my own research,” he said. 

The goal of Hall’s research isn’t to produce a commercial product, but to prove that the ingredients can be made into an affordable food that looks and tastes good. Food manufacturers then use the research to develop the products consumers see in stores.  About a decade ago, for example, Hall and Frank Manthey researched using flax in pasta. Since then, food manufacturers have developed flax-enriched pasta.

His research on bean-based snack foods and pea-protein as egg replacer bodes well for North Dakota farmers. North Dakota is the No. 1 producer of dried peas and several types of dried beans.
 

NDSU Pharmaceutical Sciences Researchers Publish 20 Papers in 2011 I 1/24/2012

January 24, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at NDSU and his lab published 20 papers on cancer research throughout 2011.

Some of the publications his research was featured in include, Journal of Immunology, Journal of Biomedical Informatics, Cancer Letters, PLoS ONE, Journal of Neuro-Oncology, European Journal of Pharmacology and Current Molecular Medicine. Wu's research areas include tumor therapeutic targets, drug target proteins, biomarkers, drug discovery, natural products, traditional Chinese medicine/complementary and alternative medicine, and pharmacogenomics.

Wu earned his doctorate in biochemistry from Sheffield University Medical School, Sheffield, England, in 1998. He went on to conduct postdoctoral research in cancer biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard University. From 2004 to 2008, he led a research group as a faculty member at Children’s Hospital Informatics Program of the Division of Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard-MIT.  Wu joined NDSU in 2008 as a tenure-track assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

NDSU Science Café Presenters Apply Statistics to Football I 1/23/2012

January 23, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — How statistics can be applied to football will be discussed during the January Science Café on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m. in Stoker’s Basement, Hotel Donaldson.

Rhonda Magel, professor and chair of the statistics department at NDSU, and Michael Price, an undergraduate student majoring in mathematics, will demonstrate the application of statistics to two questions – does football momentum translate into points and can turnover margin help predict victory in a football game?

For the first question, the average number of points obtained from the possession following an interception or fumble recovery in the National Football League is compared with the average number of points obtained from a possession with a first down starting in the same location on the field. For the second question, the probability of a team winning the game is estimated based on turnover margin while controlling for home field advantage.

The model developed is used to predict the outcome of games in the next National Football League season. Attendees to the Science Café must be 21 or older or accompanied by a parent or guardian. Science Café, sponsored by NDSU’s College of Science and Mathematics, features a presentation by a scientist and time for discussion with the scientist and other attendees.

NDSU Assistant Professor Published in The Clarinet I 1/19/2012

January 19, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Douglas Monroe, assistant professor of clarinet at NDSU, was published in the December 2011 issue of The Clarinet, a magazine of the International Clarinet Association.

The article, “An Interview with Colin Matthews: Benjamin Britten’s Movements for a Clarinet Concerto,” is about an unfinished piece of music Britten wrote for Benny Goodman in 1942. When Britten had to return to the United Kingdom during the war, United States officials confiscated the music, believed to contain spy codes. Although officials returned the music a year later, Britten did not resume working on its completion before his death in 1976. The piece was finished by Britten scholar Colin Matthews in 2007 and featured Monroe as clarinet soloist for the North American premiere earlier this fall.

NDSU Nano Center Announces Staff Changes I 1/19/2012

January 19, 2012, Fargo, N.D. – North Dakota State University’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), is implementing a reduction in force, affecting 14 positions as part of a restructuring of CNSE. The reduction in force affects areas of the Center funded in part by Congressionally-directed funding awards.

A restructuring of the Center is being implemented because Congressionally-directed funding, commonly known as earmarks, is no longer available, according to Dr. Philip Boudjouk, vice president for research, creative activities and technology transfer at NDSU. “We greatly appreciate the contributions these scientific and technical staff have made during their time at CNSE to further the Center’s scientific research,” said Boudjouk. “In the changing landscape of federal funding, CNSE will focus on areas of applied research that can provide future opportunities for public/private partnerships, specifically in the areas of microelectronics and coatings research.”

Employees affected by the reduction in force will have an opportunity to apply for positions for which they are qualified in the University system, as well as access to human resources support during the transition. Departure dates for affected employees may vary, based on University policies regarding job classifications and on the transition of research projects. As defined by University policies, severance periods and pay based on job classification ranges from two weeks to three months, totaling approximately $50,000.

CNSE will continue its high level research for federal agencies and private companies, according to Boudjouk. “We continue to receive grant funding for other research projects and are pursuing additional funding. More than 40 employees will continue working at CNSE, focusing on specialty areas of microelectronics and coatings research. “In many respects, the previous success of CNSE and its scientific achievements have positioned it to advance to a level where we can work directly with large companies on research,” said Boudjouk.

CNSE’s achievements include research on renewable energy, polymers and coatings to protect against bio-threats, and coatings for military ships. CNSE is currently working with a global company on commercial applications for the ship coatings. In addition, CNSE played a significant role in development of ground sensors used by the U.S. military on three continents, and contributed to microelectronics for military communication systems. The Center, established in 2002, will continue its scientific research with federal and private partners, said Boudjouk.

NDSU is pursuing the possibility of transitioning CNSE over a period of months to a research institute affiliated with the University, such as those affiliated with universities in Wisconsin, Utah, Illinois and Georgia. “This would be a longer-term effort that we’re examining for the future,” said Boudjouk.

NDSU Agriculture, Extension Faculty and Staff Honored I 1/19/2012

January 19, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — NDSU honored Agriculture and Extension Service faculty and staff in an awards ceremony Dec. 15.

Ken Grafton, vice president for Agriculture and University Extension, dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources and director of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, and Duane Hauck, director of the NDSU Extension Service, presented the awards during the 20th annual Agriculture and University Extension Faculty/Staff Awards program. Fifty-two people were nominated this year.

The 2011 award recipients include:

  • Larson/Yaggie Excellence in Research Award – Senay Simsek, assistant professor, Department of Plant Sciences
  • Eugene R. Dahl Excellence in Research Award – Dale Redmer, professor, Department of Animal Sciences
  • Earl and Dorothy Foster Excellence in Teaching Award – Adnan Akyuz, assistant professor, School of Natural Resource Sciences (soil science)
  • H. Roald and Janet Lund Excellence in Teaching Award – William Wilson, professor, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics
  • William J. and Angelyn A. Austin Advising Award – Kirk Howatt, associate professor, Department of Plant Sciences
  • Myron and Muriel Johnsrud Excellence in Extension/Outreach Award – Carrie Hammer, Extension equine specialist, Department of Animal Sciences
  • AGSCO Excellence in Extension Award – Ken Hellevang, Extension agricultural engineer, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
  • Charles and Linda Moses Staff Award – Mary Finseth, administrative officer, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
  • Donald and Jo Anderson Staff Award – Sandy Erickson, administrative office manager, Center for Community Vitality
  • Rick and Jody Burgum Staff Award – Stanley Stancyk, research technician, Department of Plant Sciences

NDSU Assistant Professor Featured on FORWARD Website I 1/19/2012

January 19, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Kendra Greenlee, assistant professor of biological sciences at NDSU, is the new featured faculty member on the NDSU FORWARD website.

Previously highlighted faculty include Marion Harris, professor of entomology and College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources interim associate dean for academic programs; Karen Froelich, professor of management and director of the Master of Business Administration program; Rhonda Magel, professor and chair of statistics; Kalpana Katti, University Distinguished Professor of civil engineering; Wenfang Sun, professor of chemistry and biochemistry; and Charlene Wolf-Hall, professor of veterinary and microbiological sciences and assistant dean of the graduate school.

Visit FORWARD’s website to view newly featured faculty and information on all previously highlighted faculty at www.ndsu.edu/forward.

Innovation Week at NDSU to Showcase Students’ Projects Jan. 23-27 I 1/12/2012

January 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — North Dakota State University and the NDSU Research and Technology Park are hosting the third annual Innovation Week, Jan. 23-27, to showcase students’ creative research and development projects.

"Innovation Week showcases our activities at NDSU and allows us to bring in people with new ideas to brainstorm and share," said Provost J. Bruce Rafert. "We live in a global knowledge economy, and higher education is on the front lines. At NDSU, innovation is everywhere."

A new component is the Innovation Challenge ’12. More than 60 NDSU students representing 24 teams submitted ideas for new, progressive products or services. The teams are competing for cash prizes – $5,000 for first place, $2,500 for second place and $1,000 for third place.  

“Innovation Week provides a platform to raise awareness for entrepreneurship on campus,” said Tony Grindberg, executive director of the NDSU Research and Technology Park. “By adding a competition to the week, students have the opportunity to showcase the innovative work being done on campus and to drive entrepreneurship through innovation.”

The teams’ posters will be on display Wednesday, Jan. 25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., in the Memorial Union Prairie Rose Room. Oral presentations will be the same day, 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., in the Memorial Union Great Room and Century Theater.  

“We encourage the public to attend the presentations taking place on Wednesday so they can see firsthand the innovative projects that the students will be competing on,” Grindberg said. “New software technologies, coating advancements and energy self-sustainability platforms are just a few of the projects that will be showcased.”

The Innovation Challenge ’12 awards ceremony and the Innovation Week keynote address will be Thursday, Jan. 26, at 3:30 p.m., in the Memorial Union Great Room. Businessman Tom Walter, CEO of Tasty Catering, will be the keynote speaker. A serial entrepreneur from the Chicago area, Walter has started 29 companies and acquired three more. He is a member of the Chicago Entrepreneurship Hall of Fame.  

Innovation Week also will include breakout sessions to help students learn what resources are available for aspiring business owners and to interact with members of the local business community. Topics include how to turn an idea into a business opportunity, how to finance a venture and how to find customers. Visit www.ndsuresearchpark.com/about/Pages/Events.aspx for a full list of events, which are all open to the public.

NDSU is a student-focused, land-grant, research university listed among the top 108 research universities in the nation by the Carnegie Foundation.  

The NDSU Research and Technology Park and Technology Incubator are home to fast-paced, high-growth companies that promote technology-based economic development in North Dakota. The companies compete globally or have the potential to. To operate within the park or Technology Incubator, a company needs to be involved in the advancement and development of new technology and be willing to establish a working relationship with NDSU. The companies work in the fields of material sciences, biosciences and life science technology, information technology, nanotechnology, and advanced manufacturing and sensors/micro-electronics.

NDSU Nano Research Could Impact Flexible Electronic Devices I 1/12/2012

January 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — A discovery by a research team at North Dakota State University, Fargo, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), shows that the flexibility and durability of carbon nanotube films and coatings are intimately linked to their electronic properties. The research could one day impact flexible electronic devices such as solar cells and wearable sensors. The research also provided a promising young high school student the chance to work in the lab with world-class scientists, jumpstarting her potential scientific career.

The NDSU/NIST research team, led by Erik Hobbie, Ph.D., is working to determine why thin films made from metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are superior for potential applications that demand both electronic performance and mechanical durability. “One simple reason is that the metallic nanotubes tend to transport charge more easily when they touch each other,” said Hobbie. “But another less obvious reason has to do with how much the films can flex without changing their structure at very small scales.”

Results from the study appear in “Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes,” published in ACS Nano. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn204383t

The team includes NDSU graduate student John M. Harris; postdoctoral researcher Ganjigunte R. Swathi Iyer; Anna K. Bernhardt, North Dakota Governor’s School attendee; and NIST researchers Ji Yeon Huh, Steven D. Hudson and Jeffrey A. Fagan.

There is great interest in using carbon nanotube films and coatings as flexible transparent electrodes in electronic devices such as solar cells. “Our research demonstrates that the flexibility and durability of these films are intimately linked to their electronic properties,” said Hobbie. “This is a very new idea, so hopefully, it will generate a new series of studies and questions focused on the exact origins and consequences of this effect.”

Such research could potentially result in material that reduces solar cell costs, and leads to the ability to use them in clothing or foldable electronics. Electronic devices currently on the market that require transparent electrodes, like touch screens and solar cells, typically use indium tin oxide, an increasingly expensive material. “It is also very brittle,” said Hobbie, “implying that it cannot be used in devices that require mechanical flexibility like wearable or foldable electronics.”

Single-wall carbon nanotubes show significant promise as transparent conductive coatings with outstanding electronic, mechanical and optical properties. “A particularly attractive feature of these films is that the physical properties can be tuned through the addition or subtraction of a relatively small number of nanotubes,” said Hobbie. “Thin films made from such materials hold tremendous potential for flexible electronics applications, including the replacement of indium tin oxide in liquid crystal displays and photovoltaic devices.”

Thin films made from metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which the researchers attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity. The research team found significant differences in the electronic manifestations of thin-film wrinkling, depending on the electronic type of the nanotubes, and examined the underlying mechanisms.

The results of this study suggest that the metallic films make better flexible transparent conductive coatings; they have higher conductivity and are more durable. “Our results are relevant to a number of ongoing efforts in transparent conducting films and flexible electronic devices,” said Hobbie.

The research was supported by the National Science Foundation through CMMI-0969155 and the U.S. Department of Energy through DE-FB36-08GO88160.

The opportunity to work on such research was new to Anna Bernhardt, a high school junior from a town of 1,000 people in western North Dakota. She was among 66 of the most academically driven high school sophomores and juniors who attended a six-week intensive summer residential program on the NDSU campus for scholastically motivated students in the state.

Students receive concentrated instruction from 40 NDSU faculty through discussion groups, labs, field trips and other activities. The state of North Dakota funds the cost of participation for North Dakota students who are accepted into the program. It’s available free to public school students, while private and homeschool students selected for the program can make arrangements to attend for free through their local public school district.

While it is unusual for a young student to be involved in nanotechnology research at this level, it presented an opportunity for everyone involved. Bernhardt prepared single-wall carbon nanotube samples and participated in testing of the samples. “The experience of working in a research setting has helped me to decide that I would love to do more research in the future,” said the young scientist. “The biggest benefit of working in the lab was getting a taste of the true research experience. Without North Dakota’s Governor’s School, I would never have been able to have this experience and surely wouldn’t be so certain that I would like to do more research in the future.”

Students who participate in the residential summer science program at NDSU also present their research in poster presentations. “As a young student interested in science and engineering, it gives her a great start on her career,” said Dr. Hobbie. When she graduates from high school, Bernhardt plans to major in physics.

About NDSU’s Materials and Nanotechnology Graduate Program

Dr. Erik Hobbie is a professor in the Department of Physics and in the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at NDSU. He also serves as director of NDSU’s Materials and Nanotechnology graduate program that offers students a unique opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary research. NDSU faculty from chemistry, civil engineering, coatings and polymeric materials, mechanical engineering, and physics contribute to the Materials and Nanotechnology program. Researchers in the program also collaborate with the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering at NDSU. Hobbie previously served as a senior scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota. www.ndsu.edu/materials_nanotechnology/

About North Dakota State University

North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects.  www.ndsu.edu/research

About the North Dakota’s Governor’s School

Established in 1990, the North Dakota Governor’s School is an intensive six-week summer residential program in science, mathematics, English, business, and performing or visual arts, for qualified North Dakota high school sophomores or juniors. Located on the campus of North Dakota State University, Fargo, the science portion of the program pairs students with a mentor scientist and a research group to further develop laboratory skills and quantitative data techniques. The state of North Dakota funds the program, available at no cost to qualified North Dakota students selected to participate. www.ndsu.edu/govschool/

High School Student's Research Experience at NDSU Leads to Publication in Major Scientific Journal I 1/12/2012

January 12, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — When 16-year-old Anna Bernhardt of New Salem, N.D., filled out papers to attend North Dakota Governor’s School, she didn’t know it would jumpstart her journey to become a young scientist in a major way, leading to a significant research discovery in nanotechnology.

Anna attended an intensive six-week program on the North Dakota State University campus in Fargo last summer. The Governor’s School program provides selected academically-driven high school sophomores and juniors in the state the opportunity to learn about science, mathematics, English, business, and performing or visual arts at the university level.

The science portion of the program pairs students with a mentor scientist and a research group to further develop laboratory skills. Anna wrote “physics” as her lab preference. That led to the opportunity to work with Dr. Erik Hobbie and his research team in a lab in NDSU’s Research and Technology Park.

“I had never worked in this type of setting before and didn't really know what to expect on my first day,” said Anna. “The biggest benefit of working in the lab was getting a taste of the true research experience. Without North Dakota Governor’s School, I would never have been able to have this experience, and surely wouldn't be so certain that I would like to do more research in the future. Also, it was wonderful to meet and work with the people in my lab.”

While working in the NDSU lab, Anna prepared single-wall carbon nanotube samples and participated in testing of the samples. “The experience of working in a research setting has helped me to decide that I would love to do more research in the future,” said the young scientist.

The daughter of Marlys and Leon Morgenstern, Anna has grown up on a farming and cattle operation near New Salem, N.D. There are 28 students in her class at New Salem-Almont High School. Anna said while farming operations and single wall carbon nanotubes may not be directly related, “the work ethic and having a persistent attitude definitely applied to my experience in the lab.” When she graduates from high school, Anna currently plans to major in physics.

“Anna is a very hard working and focused young woman,” said Dr. Erik Hobbie. He notes that participating in such advanced research is an unusual opportunity, not typically available to teenagers. “I would say it is highly unusual, but it was a great opportunity for everyone involved, and as a young student interested in science and engineering, it gives her a great jump on her career.”

The first day in the lab was eye opening. “Before my first day, I had absolutely zero knowledge regarding nanotubes. My first day was mostly a crash course on the research taking place, and then an assignment to read up more on what I would be working with,” said Anna. “Nothing in my high school setting had brought me close to what I was dealing with here. But I soon adjusted, and was soon doing experiments on my own. Working in the lab was unlike anything I had done before, and was altogether a pleasant experience,” said Anna.

A few things were unexpected. “The most interesting thing I learned was probably how much time and thought is put into each experiment done, and how much time is spent waiting,” said Anna. “I quickly learned that research involves much waiting around. For instance, I spent many hours waiting for acetone puddles to dry.”

Anna explains some of her highly technical work in the lab, using examples. “Single wall carbon nanotubes are basically a hexagonal lattice structure of carbon, rolled up into a tube. This is not how they are actually made, but it is a good way to envision their structure,” said Anna. There are several different types of carbon, including graphite and graphene. “Graphite is pencil lead, and graphene is a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms. A piece of graphite is put into the middle of a vacuum chamber and then a laser beam is focused on it. The pulsed laser beam hits it with high intensity and gives it so much energy at the contact point that it causes carbon atoms to fly off of the graphite and the particles condense on the walls of the chamber.  As these particles condense, they build up single-wall carbon nanotubes one layer at a time.”

Anna notes that the driving force behind the research she did is to replace expensive materials that are essential to today’s electronics. “Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a transparent and highly conductive film used in phone, computer, and television screens. ITO is very rare and therefore, extremely expensive. Since it is in such high demand, the resources are being depleted and are expected to be gone in fifteen years.”  Anna’s exacting work measured the transparency of the films in the visible spectrum at different film thicknesses for each electronic type.

The research done by Dr. Hobbie’s team, including Anna, could one day impact flexible electronic devices such as solar cells and wearable sensors. In addition to Anna, the research team includes NDSU graduate student John M. Harris; postdoctoral researcher Ganjigunte R. SwathiIyer; and researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Dr. Hobbie and grad student John Harris considered Anna’s contribution to the research substantial enough to include her as a co-author of an article about their research results, now published in a major scientific journal. “I was absolutely thrilled!” said Anna.

Results from the NDSU research team that included Anna, appear in “Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes,” published in ACS Nano http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn204383t , a major scientific journal of the American Chemical Society.

Anna said her experience in Governor’s School made the opportunity possible.

Another North Dakota Governor’s School graduate attests to the difference the experience made in her career.  Dr. Victoria Johnston Gelling, originally from Forest River, N.D., is now an associate professor in the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at NDSU. She located 30 of the 40 students in her original Governor’s School class of 1991, finding that 14 of the 30 attained doctorate, medical doctor, master’s or doctor of chiropractic degrees, and 15 of the 30 students received bachelor’s degrees. More than half of the Governor’s School students from 1991 that Dr. Gelling located from her class, stayed in North Dakota or Minnesota.

About the North Dakota’s Governor’s School

Established in 1990, the North Dakota Governor’s School is an intensive six-week summer residential program in science, mathematics, English, business, and performing or visual arts, for qualified North Dakota high school sophomores or juniors. Located on the campus of North Dakota State University, Fargo, the science portion of the program pairs students with a mentor scientist and a research group to further develop laboratory skills and quantitative data techniques. The state of North Dakota funds the program, available at no cost to qualified North Dakota students selected to participate.
www.ndsu.edu/govschool/

About NDSU’s Materials and Nanotechnology Graduate Program

Dr. Erik Hobbie is a professor in the Department of Physics and in the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at NDSU. He also serves as director of NDSU’s Materials and Nanotechnology graduate program that offers students a unique opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary research. Hobbie previously served as a senior scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota. www.ndsu.edu/materials_nanotechnology/

About North Dakota State University

North Dakota State University, Fargo, is notably listed among the nation’s top 108 public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s elite category of “Research Universities/Very High Research Activity.” As a student-focused, land grant, research institution with more than 14,000 students, NDSU is listed in the top 40 research universities in the U.S. without a medical school, based on research expenditures reported to the National Science Foundation. At the 55-acre NDSU Research & Technology Park, faculty, staff and students work with private sector researchers on leading-edge projects.  www.ndsu.edu/research


Researchers, Students Benefit from NDSU's Shared Research Facilities I 1/10/2012

January 10, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Many high-level research universities have adopted a cost-efficient solution to stretch research dollars as far as possible – sharing.

NDSU offers research core facilities available to faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students from all departments, as well as individuals throughout the region for teaching, training and research. A research scientist oversees each lab, teaches others how to use the equipment and maintains the equipment and facility. 

NDSU currently has four core facilities – Core Biology Facility, Core Synthesis Facility, Electron Microscopy Center and Advanced Imaging and Microscopy laboratory. Jane Schuh, associate professor in the Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, refers to them as “a best-case scenario.”  “One of the strongest reasons to have those facilities (core facilities) is that in a university the size of NDSU not everybody can have hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment in their lab, but we are still able to conduct cutting-edge research and have the expertise and equipment on campus,” Schuh said. 

She said offering shared facilities also is tremendous for recruiting faculty. “If most of the equipment you need only rarely for your research is available at a core facility (which is also taking care of the service contract and maintenance for it), you can walk into a new lab with more startup money to be used for equipment that is unique to your research or for operating your lab.”

Having personnel in the core lab who can teach others is key. “Having a person or people who are trained in the use and capabilities of the technology can really catapult a research program into a new level,” Schuh said. This is particularly important where research goals would benefit from technology in which the investigator does not have a background.  The core facilities also provide an important learning experience for students. “Not only do I get to use them for my research, but when my students walk out the door with their degree, they have a valuable skill that they can take with them,” Schuh said.

The newest core facility, the Advanced Imaging and Microscopy laboratory, opened in 2010. Schuh helped write grants for its new equipment, including three top-of-the-line microscopes. When combined, they allow researchers to “see it” and “measure it” at the same time, in beautiful, multicolored, 3-D, structured illumination. Later this year the lab will gain a laser scanning confocal microscope that will increase the ability to analyze tiny structures buried within a specimen. It does this with its ability to control depth of field, eliminate the background out-of-focus information and deliver an extremely high-quality image with relative ease. The microscope was funded through a cross-campus initiative to build research infrastructure. 

So far the lab is most used by departments like chemistry, engineering, animal sciences, biological sciences, pharmaceutical sciences, microbiology and plant sciences.  The opportunity is there for anyone. Schuh said, “One of the things that is very important is not just who’s using it now, but who could use it in the future.”

NDSU Researchers Develop Cloud Computing Based Disaster Management System I 1/10/2012

January 10, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Luan Li, assistant professor of computer science at NDSU, and Samee U. Khan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, have developed an elaborate cloud computing based disaster management system.

“Natural and manmade disasters require an effective and efficient management of massive amounts of data and coordination of wide varieties of people and organizations. This is where our system comes into play,” Li said. 

The system core is a web-based social network server that provides a platform to enable users (workers, first-responders, local disaster related non-profit organizations, volunteers and local residents) to access information, communicate and collaborate, in real-time from all types of computing devices, including mobile handheld devices, such as smart phones, PDAs and iPads. 

“Our system provides a community-based, effective and self-scalable cloud computing environment in which a diverse set of organizations and personnel can contribute their resources, such as data, knowledge, storage and computing platform to the cloud,” Li said. “In this way, local communities, institutions/organizations and individuals can seamlessly interact with each other to achieve massive collaboration within the affected area.” 

Khan said the motivation to develop the system was to enable all of the local Fargo-Moorhead area residents to become first-responders by providing firsthand, valuable, and timely information to the local, state and federal governments, if a calamity, such as the 2009 flood ever happened again. Khan witnessed massive destruction due to floods in his native country, Pakistan, and he wants the local community to have all of the tools available to them to fight such natural disasters.

The system was first presented to the research community at the International Conference on System of Systems Engineering, Albuquerque, N.M., in June 2011. Since then, the system has undergone further advancements, such as automatic information integration and improved interoperability between different information sources.

NDSU Associate Professor to Publish in Accounting Journal I 1/3/2012

January 3, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Bonnie Klamm, associate professor of accounting and information systems at NDSU, co-wrote the article, “Determinants of the Persistence of Internal Control Weaknesses.” It will be published in Accounting Horizons, a quarterly journal of the American Accounting Association, in June 2012. The co-authors of the article include Kevin Kobelsky, from the University of Michigan – Dearborn, and Marcia Weidenmier Watson, from Mississippi State University.

According to the authors, the paper analyzes the degree material weaknesses in internal control reported under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 affect the future reporting of material weaknesses. Particularly, they examined information technology and non-information technology material weaknesses and their breakdown into specific information technology-related entity-level, non-information technology-related entity-level and account-level deficiencies.

NDSU Researcher to Publish Papers in Current Pharmaceutical Design I 1/3/2012

January 3, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Erxi Wu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciencesat NDSU co-wrote two articles, “Therapeutic potential of perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer” and “The cancer-stroma interaction: a potential approach for pancreatic cancer treatment,” which have been accepted by Current Pharmaceutical Design. The papers will appear in the issue “Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer” for Current Pharmaceutical Design.

The first paper describes the main players in perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia and the molecular mechanisms of these pathophysiological processes. Wu said pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal human malignancies. Though a relatively rare malignancy, it remains one of the deadliest tumors with an extremely high mortality rate. Pancreatic cancer responds poorly to conventional therapies, including chemotherapy and irradiation. Tumor-specific targeted therapy is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal of anti-cancer therapies. It is important to find novel targets to distinguish tumor cells from their normal counterparts in therapeutic approaches. In the past few decades, studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic tumorigenesis, growth, invasion and metastasis. The proteins that participate in the pathophysiological processes of pancreatic cancer might be potential targets for therapy. 

The second review paper describes that the interaction between the cancer and the stroma plays a key role in the development of pancreatic cancer. The desmoplasia, which consists of fibroblasts, pancreatic stellate cells, lymphatic and vascular endothelial cells, immune cells, pathologic increased nerves and the extracellular matrix, creates a complex tumor microenvironment that promotes pancreatic cancer development, invasion, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. Thus, the potential approach for targeting the components of this desmoplastic reaction or the pancreatic tumor microenvironment might represent a novel therapeutic approach to advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Novel therapies that target on the pancreatic tumor microenvironment should become one of the more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer.

“Both papers systematically summarize perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia as well as tumor-stroma interaction as potential approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment,” Wu said, “These two papers were co-written with the Ma lab at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. Together with the Ma lab, we commit to finding cancer therapeutics and elucidating the mechanisms of the targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death.” 

Current Pharmaceutical Design is published by Bentham Science Publishers and ranks 22nd among 249 pharmacology and pharmacy journals.

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish and Present I 1/3/2012

January 3, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Kevin C. Miller, assistant professor of athletic training at NDSU, was recently interviewed by Outside Magazine regarding his research on the causes of muscle cramping. The article will discuss Miller’s observations that dehydration does not increase the risk of developing muscle cramps. The article will be published in Outside Magazine’s January 2012 issue. Outside Magazine has approximately 700,000 subscribers.

Anita Welch, assistant professor in the School of Education at NDSU, presented the paper “P-12 Robotics Competitions: Building More than Just Robots” at the School Science and Mathematics Annual Convention in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Greg Sanders, associate dean/professor in the College of Human Development and Family Science, recently published an article in Gerontology and Geriatrics Education titled “The Great Plains IDEA Gerontology Program: An Online, Interinstitutional Graduate Degree.”

Jared Tucker, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, gave a research presentation at the national Obesity Society Conference in Orlando, Fla., titled "Obesity Contributes to Reduced Physical Activity Levels Over 20 Months in Women: A Prospective Cohort Study."

Tom Carlson and Christi McGeorge, associate professors of human development and family science, and their colleague, Russell Toomey from Arizona State University, presented the paper “Establishing the Validity of the LGB Affirmative Training Inventory” at the annual conference of the National Council on Family Relations.

Gary Liguori, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at NDSU, was recently granted Fellow status in the American College of Sports Medicine. Liguori currently serves as chair of American College of Sports Medicine’s Health Fitness Specialist certification committee and also is the senior editor of its first edition Resource Manual for the Health Fitness Specialist.

Heather Fuller-Iglesias, assistant professor of human development and family science, and co-authors from the University of Michigan presented two papers at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Study of Human Development held Oct. 28-30 in Providence, R.I. The first paper, “Does family support influence well-being differently for men and women?” was written by Fuller-Iglesias and Noah Webster. The second paper, “The racial context of health effects on changes in social networks,” was written by Webster, Fuller-Iglesias and Toni Antonucci.

Linda Manikowske, associate professor, and Sara Sunderlin, senior lecturer, both in the Department of Apparel, Design and Hospitality Management, presented two poster sessions at the International Textile and Apparel Association conference in Philadelphia. The presentations were "Clothing and Connections: A Partnership for Service Learning" and "The Salvation Army Store Project: Students Make a Difference."

Kelly Sassi, assistant professor of English and English education, attended the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council for Teachers of English in Chicago where she presented during the panel session, “Common Core Standards and the Dilemma of Writing District-Wide Curriculum.” According to the convention program, the session draws on one year of curriculum work by an English Language Arts Committee comprised of a dozen sixth through 12th grade English teachers as they analyze the affordance and limitations of adopting the common core standards.

Counselor education master’s degree students recently completed their comprehensive exams and all students passed. Students take the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam, which is a nationally normed exam. Students from the NDSU counseling program scored well above (almost one Standard Deviation) the national mean on the exam.

Abby Gold, assistant professor of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences, with co-authors, Nan Yu and Elizabeth Crawford, from the NDSU Communication Department, had the paper “Combating Childhood Overweight: Effects of Informational and Narrative Radio Messages on Parents of Children and Teenagers” accepted without revisions to the Journal of Health and Mass Communication.

Faculty in the Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences were notified their article,  “Promoting Healthy Eating and Exercise Through Online Messages: A Pilot Study,” will be published in the December issue of the Journal of Extension. This represents the master’s degree work of former graduate student Helen Nyquist. Her co-authors are associate professors of health, nutrition, and exercise sciences Yeong Rhee (adviser) and Ardith Brunt; and Julie Garden-Robinson, associate professor of food and nutrition Extension.

Members of the Eating Disorders and Body Image Lab, led by Beth Blodgett Salafia, assistant professor of human development and family science, presented research at the National Council of Family Relations conference in Orlando, Fla. A paper and a poster were presented. The paper was titled, “Marital conflict and girls’ disordered eating: Parenting as a mediator,” and authors were faculty member Blodgett Salafia and graduate students Mallary Schaefer and Emily Haugen. The poster was titled “The effects of teasing by family members on adolescents’ body image,” and authors were Schaefer and Blodgett Salafia.

Kendra Erickson, a gerontology doctoral student, and Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science, presented a poster on “Links among hope, grit, and perceptions of community for older and middle-aged adults” at the 2011 Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America in Boston. The study used data that was collected as part of a larger, intergenerational study funded by National Institutes of Health Grant Number P20 RR016741 from the INBRE Program of the National Center for Research Resources, the dean of human development and education, and the Department of Human Development and Family Science.

Kristen Benson, assistant professor in the human development and family science department, presented the paper “A Qualitative Exploration of Transgender Perspectives of Therapy” at the National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference in Orlando, Fla. Benson also presented the poster, “The Bi-Directional Nature of Women’s Body Image and Sexual Experiences” with Beth Blodgett Salafia. She also was interviewed by Prairie Public Broadcasting for a segment on gender identity that will air on “Morning Edition.”

Brent Young, assistant professor, agricultural and Extension education, was elected as chair of the Managing and Editing Board of the Career and Technical Education Research Journal. Young will preside over the 2012 meeting of the board held in conjunction with the Association for Career and Technical Education annual conference. Career and Technical Education Research publishes refereed articles that examine research and research-related topics in vocational/career and technical education, career development, human resource development, career issues in the schools (Grades K-12), postsecondary education, adult and lifelong learning and workforce education.

NDSU Business Faculty’s Paper Accepted to Managerial Journal I 1/3/2012

January 3, 2012, Fargo, N.D. — Chanchai Tangpong, associate professor of management at NDSU, and Jin Li, assistant professor of marketing, co-wrote the paper, “Robustness of General Risk Propensity Scale in Cross-Cultural Settings,” which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Managerial Issues.

Tangpong and Li said risk propensity of decision makers could be an influencing factor that ultimately shapes the outcomes of multifaceted business decisions. Therefore, developing a reliable and valid measurement scale for individuals’ risk propensity has become an important research endeavor.

The study aims to modify the existing General Risk Propensity scale and improve its robustness by testing it in cross-cultural settings. Specifically, the study tested, modified and cross-validated the General Risk Propensity scale with two sub-samples – experienced business professionals in the U.S. and China. The study also tested the predictive validity of the modified General Risk Propensity scale with an empirically grounded decision-making scenario in new product development. The results suggest that the modified General Risk Propensity scale attained reliability and validity in both cultural settings. The findings support the use of this modified scale to assess general risk propensity of business decision makers in both cultural settings.

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