Statewide Housing Assessment Resource Project
Statewide Housing Assessment Resource Project
Statewide Housing Assessment Need Project Image

The North Dakota Statewide Housing Needs Assessment Resource Project (SHARP) website is one component of a statewide housing needs assessment conducted by the Center for Social Research at North Dakota State University for the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency and the North Dakota Department of Commerce Division of Community Services. In 2012, detailed publications were produced and this website was launched. The SHARP website disseminates the housing assessment results and provides updated data as they are available. The site allows you to browse six main themes related to housing: population, housing supply, housing demand, substandard housing, special populations, and land use. You can view various tables related to these topics and select the level of geography that is most appropriate for your use, including state, regions, Native American Indian reservation areas, counties, and cities. Important links to other websites related to these various themes are also available along with the 2012 needs assessment report and detailed tables.

North Dakota's eight planning regions, with associated counties and cities with 6,500 or more residents included in the study:
Tri-County Region I: Divide, McKenzie, Williams and the city of Williston.
Souris Basin Region II: Bottineau, Burke, McHenry, Mountrail, Pierce, Renville, Ward, and the city of Minot.
North Central Region III: Benson, Cavalier, Eddy, Ramsey, Rolette, Towner, and the city of Devils Lake.
Red River Region IV: Grand Forks, Nelson, Pembina, Walsh, and the city of Grand Forks.
Lake Agassiz Region V: Cass, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Steele, Traill, and the cities of Fargo, Wahpeton, and West Fargo.
South Central Dakota Region VI: Barnes, Dickey, Foster, Griggs, LaMoure, Logan, McIntosh, Stutsman, Wells, and the cities of Jamestown and Valley City.
Lewis and Clark Region VII: Burleigh, Emmons, Grant, Kidder, McLean, Mercer, Morton, Oliver, Sheridan, Sioux, and the cities of Bismarck and Mandan.
Roosevelt-Custer Region VIII: Adams, Billings, Bowman, Dunn, Golden Valley, Hettinger, Slope, Stark, and the city of Dickinson.

The largest four Native American Indian reservation areas in North Dakota included in this study:
Fort Berthold, Spirit Lake, Standing Rock, and Turtle Mountain.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STATEWIDE HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT

The purpose of the North Dakota Statewide Housing Needs Assessment is threefold. First, it offers policy-makers, developers, housing agency administrators, and others directly related to housing an overview of the current housing situation in the state. Second, it describes the changes that have occurred in the state's population base and corresponding shifts that resulted in housing stock. This relationship provides context for forecasting housing needs. Finally, the analysis presents an objective assessment of future housing needs based on a combination of a) historical trends in housing utilization, b) recent trends in housing construction, and c) demand for housing based on population and income shifts. It should be understood that determining future housing needs is a complex issue. There is no single indicator that adequately predicts future needs. Therefore, housing forecasts should be used only as one tool in developing housing policy. Nonetheless, insight can be drawn from historical trends regarding the relationship between population dynamics and corresponding housing development. The patterns that emerge, when placed within the appropriate economic and political context, are useful for predicting future housing needs. Consequently, a series of projections are provided that allows you to contrast forecasts for population movement, predicted trends in occupied housing, and two scenarios for projected housing supply. The first housing supply forecast is based on a historical pattern of housing construction while the second projected housing supply scenario is based on shifts in an area's population profile. Contrasting these two forecasts will allow you to assess how well the current pattern of housing construction, if continued into the future, fits the expected housing needs based on population projections.

In addition to the website, there are three other components to the North Dakota Statewide Housing Needs Assessment.

SUMMARY OF THE FOUR HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMPONENTS

An analysis of North Dakota's current and future housing needs was conducted in 2012 by staff at the Center for Social Research at North Dakota State University. Results of this analysis are presented in the following four formats:

2012 NORTH DAKOTA STATEWIDE HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT: HOUSING FORECAST

2012 NORTH DAKOTA STATEWIDE HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT: DETAILED TABLES 2012 NORTH DAKOTA STATEWIDE HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT: SURVEY OF STAKEHOLDERS 2012 NORTH DAKOTA STATEWIDE HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT RESOURCE PROJECT (SHARP) Website Tool