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Great Plains Sociological Association Annual Conference

The Great Plains Sociological Association (GPSA) Annual Conference will be October 24 and 25, 2013 in Fargo, ND.  The GPSA's annual conference is a great opportunity for professionals to share their work, ideas, and recent accomplishments.  The GPSA also gives graduate and undergraduate students the opportunity to present their work in a friendly yet professional atmosphere.

The theme of the 2013 conference is "Sociology is Everywhere: From Local to Global."  For more information on the conference, click here.

For registration form, click here

For schedule of events, click here.

Back into Minard

In May 2013, the faculty, graduate student and staff were moved back into the reconstructed/rebuilt/remodeled area on 4th floor Minard.  We can be found in the northwest section of the building.  Please come visit our new space.

Field School in American Samoa

From June 9 to July 3, 2012, Dr. Jeffrey Clark and Dr. Donald Schwert, a geology professor, are conducting and field school on the island of Ofu, American Samoa.  There was an article about the dig in the Samoa News. It can be found at http://www.samoanews.com/?q=node/6041   

Midwest Sociological Society Meetings in Minneapolis

Midwest Sociological Society meetings are in Minneapolis at the Downtown Marriott from March 29-April 1, 2012. We have several professors and grad students presenting. It’s a great time to meet other sociologists and see what work is being done in the field by students and professors from other universities. 

For more specific information on location and a full program:  http://www.themss.org/

Presentations from Faculty and Students of North Dakota State University:

Thursday 12:45- 2:15

Issues in Post-Socialist Transition Countries 
Organizer: Christopher Whitsel
·   Community and School Factors in Girls’ Dropout in Post-Soviet Tajikistan.....Christopher Whitsel

 Thursday 3:45- 5:15

New Research in Global Comparative Studies 
Organizer: Christopher Whitsel
• Understanding Child Labor in the 21st Century: Focus on Sub-Saharan Africa.....Courage C. Mudzongo

Friday 12:45- 2:15

Nancy Berns, Closure: The Rush to End Grief and What It Costs Us (2011) 
Discussants: Joel Best, University of Delaware; Peter Kivisto, Augustana College; Art Jipson, University of Dayton; Kent Sandstrom, North Dakota State University

Saturday 4:00-5:30

Interpersonal Interaction: Social Dynamics and Impacts 
• Altruistic Punishment: Contribution to Cooperation?.....Pamela Emanuelson

Sunday 8:15-9:45

Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Sport 
• Perceptions of Gender in Collegiate Coaching: How Men’s and Women’s Experiences Are Different.....Christie M. Chappell

Empirical Research on Teaching and Learning in Sociology: SoTL 
Co-sponsored by the Committee on Teaching & Learning
• Examining the Effectiveness of Action Research in the Classroom.....Christina Weber 

Comparative Race and Ethnicity 
• Childcare Strategies in the Bakken Oil Field: North Dakota In-Migrants Compared to Latino Immigrant Families.....Emily McCallum

Sunday 10:00-11:30

Aging in Places and Spaces
• Happiness Equals Successful Aging.....Gina Aalgaard Kelly

 

Anthropology Assistant Professor publishes work on 9/11

Joy Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of anthropology, had her photo and research narrative essay titled, “Re/placing the World Trade Center” published in Anthropology News, the monthly publication for members of the American Anthropological Association.

The essay is available on the Anthropology News website at www.anthropology-news.org/. In addition, her photograph of the Tribute in Light Memorial is featured on the American Anthropological Association’s homepage at www.aaanet.org/

Sather-Wagstaff returned to New York City Sept. 10-12, the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, for ongoing research at the former World Trade Center site as part of her longitudinal study on tourism at the site as it continues to become a formal memorial site and home to a future memorial museum.

Originally published by NDSU News on 14 September 2011 08:59 AM at www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/12455/

Whitsel publishes article

In the past year, Christopher Whitsel, assistant professor of sociology, published three articles addressing various aspects of education in Central Asia.

One article tests differences in educational attainment rates among Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. In 1991, the Soviet republics became independent states. In 1994, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan decreased compulsory education to ninth grade, but Kazakhstan kept the Soviet era standard requiring secondary education. Educational attainment was higher in Kazakhstan than other republics, although there was divergence in patterns of educational attainment among other republics. This indicated that there are other factors at play as well.

To read the rest of the article, click here

Originally published by NDSU News/Media Relations, 21 June 2011

Students honored in anthropology writing competition

Four NDSU students received recognition for essays submitted to a national writing competition hosted by The Center for a Public Anthropology.

The competition asked students to write opinion letters on a specific topic that results in a call for action. This year's focus was "Are researchers accountable, in some manner, to those who fund their research and/or the people who assist them in it? If so, how should this accountability operate?" The National Science Foundation was the specific research funding institution targeted for increased accountability.

To read the rest of the article go to:  http://www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/11222/

Originally published by NDSU News/Media Relations, 10 May 2011

NDSU faculty members offer book reading and signing

A book reading and signing will be offered by two NDSU faculty on Monday, May 9, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Stoker's Basement at the Hotel Donaldson in downtown Fargo. The event is free and open to the public. Attendees must be 21 or accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Joy Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of anthropology, wrote "Heritage That Hurts: Tourists in the Memoryscapes of September 11," and David Silkenat, assistant professor of history and education, wrote "Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, & Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina." Both books were published in February.

In her book, Sather-Wagstaff discusses how memorial sites are continuously negotiated, constructed and reconstructed into culturally meaningful landscapes through various performative activities. These activities are not limited to formal commemorative acts but also include tourists' vernacular activities and experiences both at memorial sites and post-travel. Her primary focus is on the former site of the World Trade Center in New York City. This site is compared to others including the Oklahoma City National Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She demonstrates how tourists are critical to constructing memorial sites as broadly significant rather than diminishing their social importance and in doing so, challenges existing academic theories on what is frequently called "dark tourism."

Silkenat argues that during the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to fundamentally reinterpret the morality of suicide, divorce and debt as these experiences became pressing issues throughout the region and nation. The attitudes of North Carolinians differed from people outside the South in two respects. First, attitudes toward these cultural practices changed more abruptly and rapidly in the South than in the rest of America, and second, the practices were interpreted through a prism of race. Drawing upon a robust and diverse body of sources, including insane asylum records, divorce petitions, bankruptcy filings, diaries and personal correspondence, this innovative study describes a society turned upside down as a consequence of a devastating war.

For more information, contact Sather-Wagstaff at (701) 231-6498 or joy.sather-wagstaff@ndsu.eduor Silkenat at (701) 231-9773 or david.silkenat@ndsu.edu.

 

This was originally published by NDSU News/Media Relations on 05 May 2011

http://www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/11193/

 

Anthropology Students find Rare Artifact

While participating in an archaeological field trip during the summer of 2010, NDSU students found a single large clay pot used for cooking completely intact.  

AMERICAN SAMOA - Summer on a tropical island in the Pacific sounded like a great idea to eight undergraduate and two graduate students from North Dakota State University studying anthropology. Led by Dr. Jeffrey Clark, professor of anthropology at NDSU, the students gain valuable knowledge in their field, experiencing both adventure and a few surprises during their month-long field research in American Samoa. Some of the students, along with a new group of students, are returning to the islands in 2011.

The complete story can be found at http://www.kfgo.com/fm-headline-news.php?ID=0000003368

 

Faculty and students present during Women's Week

Sociology professors and graduate students will present about their research in gender and education for NDSU women’s week. The title of the presentation is “Women and Girls in the Classroom and Beyond.” Presentation will be on Wednesday, March 9th in the Memorial Union Arikara room at 3 p.m.

This panel presentation will focus on three research projects that examine women’s and girls’ experiences in the institution of education. Each project emphasizes a different facet of gender inequality in the classroom and its impact on women as they move into the social world. The presentations include: (1) Angie Hodge and Christina D. Weber: “Women and Mathematics: The Importance of Self-Efficacy in the STEM Fields;” (2) Sam Larson: “A Few ‘Good’ Women: Exploring the Career Aspirations and Challenges of Young, Single and College-Educated Women from Rural North Dakota;” and (3) Christopher Whitsel and Madhurim Thapa: “School and Classroom Factors of Girl’s Drop-out in Tajikistan.”

Presenters:
Angie Hodge, Ph.D., assistant professor, Departments of Mathematics and Teacher Education, NDSU
Sam Larson, graduate student, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, NDSU
Madhurim Thapa, graduate student, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, NDSU
Christina D. Weber, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, NDSU
Christopher Whitsel, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, NDSU

 

Sather-Wagstaff publishes book on tourist's experiences at memorial sites

Published by NDSU's News/Medial Relations, 01 March 2011

Joy Sather-Wagstaff, assistant professor of anthropology, published "Heritage That Hurts: Tourists in the Memoryscapes of September 11" in mid-February.

In the book, Sather-Wagstaff argues memorial sites are public spaces that are continuously negotiated, constructed and reconstructed into culturally meaningful landscapes through various performative activities. These activities are not limited to formal commemorative acts but also include tourists' activities and experiences at memorial sites and post-travel. Sather-Wagstaff's primary focus is on the former site of the World Trade Center in New York. This site-in-process is compared to other sites, including the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Vietnam Veterans Memorial. She demonstrates how tourists are critical to constructing memorial sites as broadly significant rather than diminishing their social importance and in doing so, challenges existing academic theories on what is called "dark tourism."

The book is the fourth volume published in the Left Coast Press Heritage, Tourism and Community series.

Originally published by NDSU News/Media Relations at http://www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/10647/

Kloberdanz Donates Folklore Collection

Published by NDSU's News/Medial Relations, 24 February 2011

Timothy J. Kloberdanz, professor emeritus of anthropology, recently donated about 10,745 individual folklore items to NDSU's Institute for Regional Studies.  All of the folklore was collected by Kloberdanz and hundreds of his anthropology students during a period of more than 30 years (1977-2010).  To read more see http://www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/10631/

 

 

NDSU alumna selected as Fulbright Alumni Ambassador

Published: 24 February 2011 08:17 AM

NDSU alumna Emily Hagemeister, BA '05 and MS '09 (anthropology), of Argusville, N.D., was selected as one of 18 Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors who will represent and promote the Fulbright U.S. Student Programs.

As an ambassador, Hagemeister will speak about Fulbright experiences at campus presentations and conferences and offer tips about applying for Fulbright grants in articles, webinars, interviews and at special events nationwide, with special attention on helping increase the diversity of Fulbright applicants.

Hagemeister was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship in Amman, Jordan, for the 2009-10 academic year. "It's a great honor to represent the Fulbright program as an Alumni Ambassador," says Hagemeister. "I look forward to helping Fulbright reach a broader pool of applicants and change lives, as it did mine."

More information about the Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors can be found at http://us.fulbrightonline.org/alumniambassadors.html; more information on Fulbright programs can be found at www.iie.org/fulbright. Prospective applicants to Fulbright U.S. Student programs can reach Hagemeister at EHagemeister.AlumniAmbassador@Fulbrightmail.org.

This was originally published by NDSU News/Media Relations at http://www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/10627/

 

150-year old letters give voice to Dakota prisoners

From MPR News, January 19, 2011:

Clifford Canku has spent the last 10 years, working with other Dakota elders, translating 50 letters written by Dakota prisoners of war in the 1860. For the rest of the story go to http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/01/19/dakota-tribe-letters/

 

Canku published Dakota language textbook

Published: 10 January 2011 09:05 AM

Clifford Canku, assistant professor of practice for Dakota Studies, is the co-author of the recently released textbook, "Tokaheya Dakota Iapi Kin/Beginning Dakota," published by Minnesota Historical Society Press. Canku's co-authors are two of his former Dakota language students at the University of Minnesota-Morris, Jody Snow and Nicolette Knudson. Snow succeeded Canku as Dakota language instructor at UM-Morris when Canku joined NDSU in 2009.

Before publication, the book was tested in self-published form in Dakota language courses at NDSU, UM-Morris and Sisseton Wahpeton College in South Dakota. It is now available to colleges, universities and the public.

Originally posted by NDSU News/Media Relations at www.ndsu.edu/news/view/article/10304/

Perspectives

The Spring 2011 issue of Perspectives, the sociology newsletter is available. Click here.


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North Dakota State University
Sociology and Anthropology Department: +1 (701) 231-8657
Fax: +1 (701) 231-5118
Campus Address: Minard Hall 428, Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing Address: Dept. 2350, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Site manager: Kate Ulmer

Last Updated: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 2:41:56 PM