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Wellness Center

 


Healthy Herd Initiative

The Healthy Herd Initiative envisions a campus culture where students make their health and wellness a priority and in which every member of North Dakota State University community is provided the support needed to achieve overall wellness and enhance academic success. 

 

Campus Wellness Resources

        

 General Wellness  

        



Academic Success

     

Alcohol and Other Drugs

      

Assistance for Persons
with Disabilities 




Financial Health


Fitness / Physical Activity


Health Services








Mental Health Services


Nutrition


Healthy Relationships



Stress Management 

Time Management 



Faculty Staff Wellness 

Fitness/Physical Activity

Physical activity is anything that gets your body moving. According to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, you need to do two types of physical activity each week to improve your health–aerobic and muscle-strengthening. 

Adults need at least:

walking

2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) every week and

weight training

muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest,  shoulders, and arms).

OR

jogging

1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running) every week and

weight training

muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest,  shoulders, and arms).

OR

walking jogging  

An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and

weight training

muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest,  shoulders, and arms).

 For more information and tips on how to get started with an exercise program visit the American Heart Association Website    

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Nutrition

Eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of many chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, and some cancers. Research also has found that replacing foods of high energy density (high calories per weight of food) with foods of lower energy density, such as fruits and vegetables, can be an important part of a weight-management strategy. In addition, fruits and vegetables are good sources of many important nutrients, including potassium, vitamin C, folate, iber, and numerous phytochemicals.  The importance of fruits and vegetables as part of healthy diets is illustrated by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, in which two of the four recommended food groups are fruits and vegetables.

NDSU Wellness Center Licensed Dietician: Janet Brown, RD, LRD

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Stress Management

Wellness Center  Regular physical activity can help keep your thinking, learning, and judgment skills sharp as you age. It can also reduce your risk of depression and may help you sleep better. Research has shown that doing aerobic or a mix of aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities 3 to 5 times a week for 30 to 60 minutes can give you these mental health benefits. Some scientific evidence has also shown that even lower levels of physical activity can be beneficial.

Counseling Center  The NDSU Counseling Center provides a confidential setting in which students may explore concerns of a personal, academic or career related nature; makes referrals and serves as consultants for faculty staff. Students can visit a secure web site on the counseling center web page to complete a brief, anonymous and confidential questionnaire called the Stress and Depression Screening Questionnaire, which should only take about 10 minutes to complete.

 

 

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Academic Success

 ACE Tutoring: Academic Collegiate Enhancement (ACE) is a free academic support program available to all enrolled undergraduate students. Whether you would like help with homework, tips on studying for an exam, or strategies for taking notes, ACE can help you achieve your academic goals

Advising Resource Center: Ask basic questions about general education requirements. Get connected with your academic advisor. Understand academic policies at NDSU. Receive guidance on academic major, including how to add/change a major/minor. Get referrals to academic resources on campus.

Student Success Programs:  Student Success Programs recognize that the transition to college can be both exciting and challenging. Whether you are coming to North Dakota State University directly from high school, transferring from another college or university, or returning as a nontraditional student, Student Success Programs are here to help make that transition a positive experience.

TRIO - The Federal TRIO Programs are educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. TRIO includes six outreach and support programs targeted to serve and assist low-income, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to post-baccalaureate programs.

 

 

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Alcohol and Other Drugs

Counseling Center  Brief Alcohol and Screening and Intervention for College Students is a service available for students who want to explore their alcohol and other drug use.  It is designed to assist students in examining their own behaviors in a judgment-free environment. 

Student Success Programs  Choices abound in college - food, classes, majors, relationships and alcohol. The majority of NDSU students make wise choices about alcohol. However, those who don't can find alcohol to be a major obstacle to their personal and academic success. Our alcohol and drug prevention programs strive to educate students and parents about the risks associated with alcohol use, communicate clear messages about the consequences of underage drinking and provide lots of on-campus, late-night activities.

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Assistance for Persons with Disabilities

Temporary Medical Conditions  Students enrolled at NDSU may at some time require assistance in accessing the learning environment due to a temporary medical condition. Temporary medical conditions are ones that are expected to be resolved in a matter of weeks or a few months, e.g., a broken arm, or a broken leg or infectious mononucleosis.  Unlike services or accommodations approved for eligible students with disabilities, the University is not obligated to provide “courtesy services” under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).   

Disability Services  Disability Services (DS) assists both students with disabilities, and faculty and staff working with students with disabilities. 
DS staff members can provide individual consultation regarding the possible presence of a disability, determine eligibility for accommodations and services, explain how to access services, and consult with students, faculty and staff and partner with NDSU personnel to implement appropriate accommodations.

Faculty & Staff Wellness

BCBSND - NDPERS - Good health is a gift, so how do you hang onto it? BCBSND provides tools and resources for managing your own health. And BCBSND provides some incentives for doing so.

Tobacco Cessation The North Dakota Public Employees Retirement System received a grant from North Dakota Department of Health to help state employees and their dependents age 18 and older quit smoking or chewing tobacco. The grant will pay for approved counseling, medications and health care provider visits and co-pays. This project is administered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota.

NDSU Wellness Center  The NDSU Wellness Center is a participating club in the NDPERS and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of North Dakota Health Club Credit Program.  Wellness Center members who enroll in the BCBSND Health Club Credit program are eligible to receive a $20-a-month credit (reimbursement) for membership fees.  Individuals must work out at least 12 days per month to receive their credit. (Only one visit per day will be counted.) A maximum of two (2) people - subscriber and spouse age 18 and older - can participate with a maximum credit of $40 per household.

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General Wellness

What is Wellness?
Wellness is an active, lifelong process of becoming aware of choices and making decisions toward a more balanced and fulfilling life.

  • Process means that we never arrive at a point where there is no possibility of improvement. 
  • Aware means that we are by our nature continuously seeking more information about how we can improve.
  • Choices means that we have considered a variety of options and have selected those that seem to be in our best interest.

Wellness combines seven dimensions of well-being into a quality way of living. Wellness is the ability to live life to the fullest and to maximize personal potential in a variety of ways. Wellness places responsibility on the individual; it becomes a matter of self-evaluation and self-assessment. Wellness involves continually learning and making changes to enhance your state of wellness.

Physical (body)
A healthy body maintained by good nutrition, regular exercise, avoiding harmful habits, making informed and responsible decisions about health, and seeking medical assistance when necessary. To remain well, physical wellness requires that you take steps to protect your physical health by eating a well-balanced diet, getting plenty of physical activity and exercise, maintaining proper weight, getting enough sleep, avoiding risky sexual behavior, trying to limit exposure to environmental contaminants, and restricting intake of harmful substances.

Intellectual (mind)
A state in which your mind is engaged in lively interaction with the world around you. Intellectual wellness involves unbridled curiosity and ongoing learning. This dimension of wellness implies that you can apply the things you have learned, that you create opportunities to learn more, and that you engage your mind in lively interaction with the world around you.

Emotional (feelings) 
The ability to understand your own feelings, accept your limitations, achieve emotional stability, and become comfortable with your emotions. Emotional wellness implies the ability to express emotions appropriately, adjust to change, cope with stress in a healthy way, and enjoy life despite its occasional disappointments and frustrations.

Social (family, friends, relationships)
The ability to relate well to others, both within and outside the family unit. Social wellness endows us with the ease and confidence to be outgoing, friendly and affectionate toward others. Social wellness involves not only a concern for the individual, but also an interest in humanity and the environment as a whole.

Spiritual (values, purpose, intuition, vitality) 
The sense that life is meaningful and has a purpose; the ethics, values and morals that guide us and give meaning and direction to life. Spiritual wellness implies a search for meaning and purpose in human existence leading one to strive for a state of harmony with oneself and others while working to balance inner needs with the rest of the world.

Occupational (career, skills) 
Preparing and making use of your gifts, skills and talents in order to gain purpose, happiness and enrichment in your life. Occupational wellness means successfully integrating a commitment to your occupation into a total lifestyle that is satisfying and rewarding. The development of occupational satisfaction and wellness is strongly related to your attitude about your work.

Environmental (air, water, food, safety) 
The capability to live in a clean and safe environment that is not detrimental to health. The quality of today's environment has a direct effect on personal wellness. To enjoy environmental wellness we require clean air, pure water, quality food, adequate shelter, satisfactory work conditions, personal safety and healthy relationships.

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North Dakota State University
Phone: +1 (701) 231-5200 / Fax: (701) 231-5205
Campus address: Wallman Wellness Center 100
Physical/delivery address: 18th Street and Centennial Blvd., Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address: NDSU Dept. 5140 / PO Box 6050 / Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Page manager: NDSU Wellness Center

http://www.ndsu.edu/wellness/contact/

Last Updated: Sunday, March 30, 2014 12:40:55 AM