Most of North Dakota is experiencing a severe drought. NDSU Agriculture has assembled important resources for dealing with the drought. Access them now. 

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South-Central/Southeast ND (06/17/21)

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According to NDAWN, the region’s first-half June rainfall ranges from 0.4 inch (Carrington and Zeeland) to 4.5 inches (Marion).

According to NDAWN, the region’s first-half June rainfall ranges from 0.4 inch (Carrington and Zeeland) to 4.5 inches (Marion). Recent rain generally has helped improve row crop stands but plant density generally is less than targeted at planting time. The reduced plant stands certainly have potential to yield well but we need cooperative growing conditions. High wind that occurred last Friday (June 11) neutralized some of the positive effects of the rain besides damaging plants and eroding soil. Additional soil moisture is soon needed to salvage our small grain crop as it heads and begins seed formation.

Corn is in the 4- to 7-leaf stages; ears have been initiated and number of seed rows being determined. Corn damaged by the May 28 frost lost the lowest leaves and has ragged mid-leaves, but newest and future leaves are developing normally (see picture). If corn plants are missing leaves, use growing degree day units (available on NDAWN) and the following rule-of-thumb to estimate corn growth stage: 120-125 units for plant emergence; then 80-85 units per leaf until the V10 (10 leaf collar) stage.

Established soybean, dry bean and sunflower plants can tolerate stress conditions for several weeks but ample soil moisture will be required for satisfactory yield as these crops move later into reproduction stages.

Weeds continue to be the most economically important crop pest but a growing list of insects need to be considered as our season advances.

corn in a field damaged by frost
Photo Credit:
Greg Endres
Corn at Carrington Research Extension Center on June 14, 2021 damaged by May 28, 2021 frost





 

 

 

 

 


 



 


 

Greg Endres

Extension Cropping Systems Specialist

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center