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Fusarium Yellows in Sugarbeet Fields (07/01/21)

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Fusarium yellows have been identified in several fields in the Sidney factory district. The major Fusarium species found in sugarbeet are F. oxysporum and secorum. Typical symptoms are easily seen when plants are at the 4- to 6-leaf stage and older. Yellowing, leaf wrinkling, and necrosis are common foliar symptoms starting on the oldest leaves (Figure 1). Outer surface of roots are healthy but the vascular system of the root is blocked and discolored (Figures 2 and 3). In areas with high inoculum density and favorable environmental conditions, Fusarium infection will kill young plants. In areas where the disease is less severe, plants will survive but roots will be smaller, may be sprangled, and with typically low sugar content. There is no fungicide that is currently available that will cure this disease. Growers are encouraged to record fields with Fusarium and plant varieties that are highly resistant to Fusarium (Figure 4) the next time an infected field is planted with sugarbeet.

Figure 1. Typical symptoms of Fusarium yellows on an 8- to 10-leaf plant – necrosis starting on oldest leaves followed by similar symptoms on younger inner leaves, Figure 2. Longitudinal section of Fusarium infected sugarbeet root showing vascular discoloration starting from the root tip moving upwards.  Figure 3.  Cross section of Fusarium infected sugarbeet root showing vascular discoloration and ‘woodiness’. Figure 4. Fusarium resistant sugarbeet variety in an infected nursery.

 

Mohamed Khan

Extension Sugarbeet Specialist

NDSU & U of MN

701-231-8596

 

Mohamed Khan

Extension Sugarbeet Specialist

NDSU & U of MN

701-231-8596