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Farm Safety

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Doug Bichler, Emmons County Farmer and Rancher reminds producers to be thinking all the time to avoid accidents like his.

A family of four stand in in a farm yard. One parent is holding a toddler. The other is holding an infant. Green grass, a line of dark green trees and a blue sky with puffy white clouds are visible behind them.

"A farm-related accident can happen in an instant; often, that one decision will change the course of a life forever. This was the case for me. One simple, ill-thought choice led to the amputation of my right arm.

I am no stranger to farm safety. As a previous Extension agent and a lifelong farmer and rancher, I know the importance of safety on the farm. The night of my accident, the thought of climbing in the cab an extra time to turn off the baler seemed to be too much. But that simple action would have been the thing that saved my arm.

 Every action we as farmers make must be well-thought. Every job, every turn of the key, every flip of the switch is paramount to our health and well-being. No amount of work is worth losing or altering a life. Always practice farm safety, and always think one step ahead. The farmer you are in 10 years will thank you for the decisions you make today."

Sections
Page Portals
crop sprayer spraying field

Chemical Safety

Information on using chemicals safely on the farm.

Grain Bin Safety

Working in and Around Grain Storage and Silo Enclosures

Livestock Safety

Livestock Safety
Teens posing in front of a green tractor

Tractor and Road Safety

Tractor and Road Safety