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NDSU PCPE

 


Jeremy Jackson, Ph.D.

Director and Professor of Economics

Jeremy Jackson is the director of the NDSU Center for the Study of Public Choice and Private Enterprise (PCPE) and an associate professor in the NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of microeconomics, public economics, and game theory and strategy. His research covers diverse topics, including public choice and the political economy; the social consequences of economic freedom; happiness and well-being; and philanthropy and nonprofits. His research has been published in Applied Economics, The Independent ReviewPublic Choice, Contemporary Economic Policy, Journal of Happiness Studies, and other refereed and non-refereed sources. He is a member of the Foundation for Economic Education Faculty Network, American Economic Association, Association of Private Enterprise Education, Omnicron Delta Epsilon, Public Choice Society, and Association for Public Economic Theory.

Jeremy resides in Fargo with his wife, Dr. Elizabeth Crawford, and their two sons.

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, 2008
M.A. Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, 2002
B.A. Economics, Baylor University, 2001

CONTACT

Office: Barry Hall 400B
Phone: 701-231-7832
Email: jeremy.jackson@ndsu.edu

PUBLICATIONS

Journal Articles
Jeremy Jackson and Jeffrey Palm* (2017), “The Limits of Redistribution and the Impossibility of Egalitarian Ends.” The Independent Review, vol. 22, n 1, pp. 71-81.
Jeremy Jackson (Forthcoming), “Free to be Happy: Economic Freedom and Happiness in US States.” Journal of Happiness Studies http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10902-016-9770-9
Jeremy Jackson (2017), “Economic Freedom and Social Capital: Pooled Mean Group Evidence.” Applied Economics Letters, vol. 24, n 6, pp. 370-373. dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504851.2016.1194958
Aspen Gorry and Jeremy Jackson (2017), “A Note on the Nonlinear Effect of Minimum Wage Increases.” Contemporary Economic Policy, vol. 35, n 1, pp.53- 61. doi:10.1111/coep.12175
Jeremy Jackson, Art Carden, and Ryan Compton (2015), “Economic Freedom and Social Capital.” Applied Economics, vol. 47, n 54, pp. 5853-5867.
Jeremy Jackson and Jason Smith (2015), “A Framework for Non-drastic Innovation with Product Differentiation.” Economics Bulletin, vol. 35, n 1, pp. 259-269. 
Siew Lim, Cheryl Wachenheim, David Roberts, Linda Burbidge, and Jeremy Jackson (2014), “Gender Differences in Economics.” NACTA Journal, vol. 58, n 4, pp. 335-340.
Joleen Hadrich and Jeremy Jackson (2014), “Livestock emissions regulation with unknown damages and strategic technology adoption.” Applied Economics, vol. 46, n 35, pp. 4309-4317.
Jeremy Jackson, Cameron Thraen, and Marin Bozic (2013), “Conflict Over Cooperation: Why so much Disagreement Over the Proposed Dairy Market Stabilization Program?” Journal of Agricultural and Food Industrial Organization, vol. 11, n 1, pp. 129-138.
Jeremy Jackson (2013), “Tax Earmarking, Party Politics and Gubernatorial Veto: Theory and Evidence from US States.” Public Choice, vol. 155, n 1, pp. 1-18. [Lead Article] 
Jeremy Jackson (2011), “A Legislative Bargaining Approach to Earmarked Public Expenditures.” Economics Bulletin, vol. 31, n 3, pp. 2006-2020. 
Essays and Book Chapters
Jeremy Jackson (2015), “Abolish the Minimum Wage.” Issues: Understanding Controversy and Society. ABC-CLIO. issues2.abc-clio.com/ 

PRESENTATIONS

Conferences
Does Economic Freedom Create Social Capital in US States?. Association of Private Enterprise Education, Las Vegas, NV April 2016.
Does Economic Freedom Create Social Capital in US States?. Public Choice Society Meetings, Fort Lauderdale, FL March 2016. 
Panelist, Freedom and Flourishing: An interdisciplinary perspective. Association of Private Enterprise Education, Canc´un, Mexico April 2015.
Free to be Happy. Association of Private Enterprise Education, Canc´un, Mexico April 2015. 
Gender Differences in Economics. Poster Presentation, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Annual Meeting, Minneapoplis, MN 2014. (Cheryl Wachenheim presenter)
Economic Freedom and the Production of Social Capital. Public Choice Society Meetings, Charleston, SC March 2014.
Legislative Bargaining and Public Good Provision: An Equilibrium Characterization. Public Choice Society Meetings, Miami, FL March 2012.
Dynamic Technological Innovation with Research Licensing. Association for Public Economic Theory Meetings, Bloomington, IN June 2011 
Earmarking, Party Politics and Gubernatorial Veto: Theory and Evidence from US States. Social Choice and Welfare Meetings, Montreal, Qc. 2008 
Earmarking and Gubernatorial Veto: Theory and Evidence. Public Choice Society Meetings, San Antonio, TX March 2008. June 2008.
A Legislative Bargaining Approach to Earmarked Public Expenditures. Association for Public Economic Theory Meetings, Nashville, TN July 2007.
A Legislative Bargaining Approach to Earmarked Public Expenditures. Washington University Graduate Student Conference, St. Louis, MO November 2007.
Invited
Freedom and Philanthropy. Baylor University, Dec 2 2016.
Freedom and Philanthropy. Southern Methodist University, Dec 1 2016.
Participant in New Directions in Well-Being Research Workshop at Brookings Institution (May 19-20, 2016). 
Economic Freedom and Social Capital. NDSU, November 2013.
Equilibrium and Efficiency Under Experimental Use Licensing. Utah State University, May 2013.
Dairy Emissions Regulation With Unknown Damages and Strategic Technology Adoption. University of North Dakota, December 2011. 
Dynamic Technological Innovation with Research Licensing. University of Manitoba, March 2011.
Dynamic Technological Innovation with Research Licensing. NDSU, February 2011. 
Earmarking and Gubernatorial Veto: Theory and Evidence. Washington University Brown Bag Seminar, St. Louis, MO February 2008. 
A Legislative Bargaining Approach to Earmarked Public Expenditures. Washington University Brown Bag Seminar, St. Louis, MO April 2007. 

 


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North Dakota State University
Phone: +1 (701) 231-7790 / Fax: (701) 231-7400
Campus address: Richard Barry Hall 400
Physical/delivery address: 811 2nd Avenue North, Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address: NDSU Dept. 7610 / PO Box 6050 / Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Page manager: Center for the Study of Public Choice and Private Enterprise

Last Updated: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 3:38:55 PM
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