Graduate Student Workshops

Thursday, October 3rd 3:00-4:00: Writing a First Draft

Most graduate students understand that writing well is a key component of academic success. However, most are also so busy reading for disciplinary content they don’t have time to consider how successful writers work the craft of writing. To help address this gap, the Graduate Center for Writers is offering a workshop for graduate students that highlights this often overlooked step of academic writing (approx. 50 min.).

Location: Room of Nations, MU

Tuesday, October 8th 1:00-2:15: Avoiding Plagiarism

Attributing research, ideas, and writing to their sources is a bedrock of academic integrity. Plagiarism, on the other hand, undermines not only the writer and researcher who intentionally or unintentionally plagiarizes, but also the work presented in the plagiarized paper. This workshop by the Center for Writers presents information about what is considered plagiarism and techniques to avoid plagiarism (approx. 75 min.).

Location: Mandan Room, MU

Week 8: Wednesday, Oct. 23rd: 12:00-1:00: How to Correct Common Word Choice Mistakes

Good ideas can get lost in poor word choices. In the Center for Writers graduate workshop on “How to Correct Common Word Choice Mistakes,” we take on three common errors in a way that can help clear up your writing so those good ideas can come through (approx. 50 min.)!

Location: Room of Nations, MU

Week 9: Thursday, October 31st 1:00-2:15: Writing the Methods Section

We know that the Methodology section is supposed to explain the “what” and “how” of our research, but really, how much detail do we need? How do we organize our process? Why can’t we just put in bullet points? This workshop addresses strategies for organizing and then accurately communicating our research process and progress (approx. 75 min.).

Location: Mandan Room, MU

Week 10: Wednesday, Nov. 6th 12:30-1:30: Writing a Teaching Philosophy

If it’s not exactly a personal statement and it’s not exactly an essay—what exactly is a Teaching Philosophy? Maybe even more confusing is why do employers want ours, and—most pressing of all—how do we go about writing one? This workshop answers these questions and helps you to brainstorm ideas for this difficult, but necessary, writing requirement (approx. 50 min.).                

Location: Hidatsa Room, MU

Tuesday, Nov. 19th 3:00-4:00: How to Correct Common Grammar and Punctuation Mistakes

Good ideas can get lost in bad grammar and punctuation. In the Center for Writers graduate workshop on “How to Correct Common Grammar and Punctuation Mistakes,” we take on four common errors in a common sense way that can help clear up your writing so those good ideas can come through (approx. 50 min.).

Location: Room of Nations, MU

Wednesday, Dec. 4th 2:00-3:00: Personal Statements

Particularly difficult to write, the personal statement can make or break job, scholarship, or even grant applications. In this workshop we focus on some effective strategies and common pitfalls for writing this unusual genre (approx. 50 min.).      

Location: Meadow Room, MU  

 Winter Break Disquisition Boot Camp: Monday, January 6th - Wednesday January 8th

 

Faculty Workshops


Thursday, Sept. 26th 2:00-3:15: Creating Effective Instructions and Rubrics

Grading writing assignments is notoriously time consuming. However, effectively written instructions and rubrics can save time for busy faculty and frustration for student writers; geared to faculty (approx. 75 min.).
Location: Center for Writers, Lower Level of the Library

 

Wednesday, October 16th 12:00-1:00: Tips for Helping ELL Writers

Addressing the needs of student writers can be difficult, and when students are not native English speakers it becomes even more complex. This workshop can help set a foundation for effectively working with ELL student writers across disciplines(approx. 50 min.)
Location: Center for Writers, Lower Level of the Library

 

Thursday, Nov. 14th 12:00-1:00: Providing Effective Feedback to Students

As educators we know that student writing is a vital component to student success, yet we also know that responding to student writing can be both time-consuming and   frustrating. This workshop from the Center for Writers focuses on strategies that can both streamline grading and make feedback more effective for improved student writing.  Geared to faculty (approx. 50 min.).
Location: Center for Writers, Lower Level of the Library

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