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Dr. Rebecca Weaver-Hightower
Professor and Chair of English

PhD English Literature (University of Kentucky, 2002)

Office: Minard 318G
Phone: 701-231-6587
r.weaverhightower@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching:
Postcolonial Studies, Settler Narratives

About Dr. Weaver-Hightower

I am delighted to be joining the English department at NDSU and am looking forward to learning about my new campus, getting to know my new colleagues, and meeting the new challenges of this leadership position. I am a transplanted North Dakotan—a southerner by birth, as is my spouse, Marcus (professor of Education at UND)—but we have both come to appreciate the Midwestern culture and almost adjust to the Red River Valley weather. For us as much as our children—Harrison, aged 10, and Evelyn, aged 6—North Dakota has become home, and I am excited to continue to serve the people of North Dakota as a Professor of English and Department Chair at North Dakota State University.

Recent Publications

Books

  • Frontier Fictions: Settler Sagas and Postcolonial Guilt, Palgrave McMillan, in press, 2019.
  • Archiving Settler Colonialism: Culture, Space and Race. Eds. Yu-Ting Huang and Rebecca Weaver-Hightower. Routledge, forthcoming fall 2018.
  • Postcolonial Film: History, Empire, Resistance.  Eds. Rebecca Weaver-Hightower and Peter Hulme. Routledge, 2014.
  • Empire Islands:  Castaways, Cannibals, and Fantasies of Conquest in Post/Colonial Island Narratives, University of Minnesota Press, 2007.
  • Selected Poems of Robert Greacen.  Edited by Jack Weaver and Rebecca Weaver-Hightower. Salman Press, 2006.

Articles and Books Chapters

  • “The Gothic Uncanny as Colonial Allegory in The Island of Doctor Moreau.” Rebecca Weaver-Hightower and Rachel Piwarski.  Forthcoming, Gothic Studies
  • “‘Do We Reverse the Medal?’: Settler Guilt, the Indian Speech, and the Untold Side of the Story.” Western American Literature. Vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 25-53.
  • “The Complicated Identity Negotiation of Women in Kangni Alemdjrodo’s Chemin de Croix. Hamzat Koriko and Rebecca Weaver-Hightower International Journal of Francophone Studies.  vol. 19, no. 3-4, 2017, pp. 341-61.
  • “Teaching Kate Grenville’s The Secret River” with Marguerite Nolan, Australian Catholic University, in Teaching Australian and New Zealand Literature. Eds. Nicholas Birns, Nicole Moore, and Sarah Shieff.  MLA Options for Teaching series.  Modern Language Association, 2017.
  • “Settlers and Their Literature.” (4000 word essay) Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Postcolonial Studies. Sangeeta Ray and Henry Schwarz eds. Wiley-Blackwell, 2016.
  • “Pride and Prejudice and Postcolonial Zombies,” in Pride and Prejudice: A Bicentennial Bricolage.  Ed. Caterina Columba. Forum University Press, 2016, pp. 57-75.  
  • “Letter from South Africa” with Marcus Weaver-Hightower.  Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, 2014, pp. 75-85.
  • “Introduction: New Perspective on Postcolonial Film.” In Postcolonial Film: History, Empire, Resistance. Eds. Rebecca Weaver-Hightower and Peter Hulme. Routledge, 2014.
  • “The South African Postcolonial Hybrid in District 9,” in Postcolonial Film: History, Empire, Resistance. Eds. Rebecca Weaver-Hightower and Peter Hulme. Routledge, 2014.
  • “Tomb Raider Archaeologists and the Exhumation of the U.S. Neoimperial Cinematic Fantasy” The Journal of Popular Culture. 47.1 (Feb 2014): 109-128.
  • “’Before God This Was Their Country’: History and Guilt in Stuart Cloete’s Turning Wheels and the Voortrekker Monument, Pretoria,” English in Africa. 40.2 (October 2013): 101-120.
  • “The Frontier Landscape and Guilty Settler in Nineteenth Century Colonial Literature,” Geocritical Explorations: Space, Place, and Mapping in Literary and Cultural Studies. Ed. Robert Tally. Palgrave McMillan, 2011: 123-138.  
  • “Islands and the Narrating of Possession,” (translated into Hebrew), essay for Islands exhibit catalogue, Museums of Bat Yam, Israel, 2010. 
  • “The Sorry Novels: Peter Carey’s Oscar and Lucinda, Greg Matthews’ The Wisdom of Stones and Kate Grenville’s The Secret River, in Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature, ed. Nathanael O’Reilly, Cambria Press, 2010: 129-156.
  • “Children’s Literature and African Studies,” Invited essay-review of Elwyn Jenkins National Character in South African English Children’s Literature (Routledge 2006) and Vivia Yenika-Agbaw’s Representing Africa in Children’s Literature: Old and New Ways of Seeing (Routledge 2007) for Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies, 9. 4 (2008): 469-474.

Dr. Anastassiya Andrianova 
Assistant Professor of English
PhD Comparative Literature (CUNY, 2011)

Office: Minard 318 E48
Anastassiya.Andriano@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: British Romantic and Victorian literature, drama, translation, pedagogy, Comparative Literature, Slavic literature, Animal Studies, and Postcolonial Studies

About Dr. Andrianova

Dr. Andrianova received her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), specializing in British literature and philosophy of the long 19th century, from David Hume to Bernard Shaw. She has published on Victorian literature and culture, drama, postcolonial literature, translation, and pedagogy in Modern Drama, Translation and Literature, and other peer-reviewed journals, and is currently working on representations of animals in 19th-21st century literature and culture, with a focus on animal consent. She is also an Editorial Board Member for Supernatural Studies and the 2016-2019 Special-Interest Delegate to the MLA Delegate Assembly representing Lecturers, Adjuncts, and Instructors.

Dr. Andrianova has been teaching undergraduate courses in literature and writing since Fall 2004. She joined NDSU’s English Department in Spring 2014 and has taught a variety of courses, including: Introduction to Literary Studies, Survey of British Literature II, World Literature Masterpieces, Honors Composition, Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and Business and Professional Writing.

Academia.edu Site 
CV

Recent Publications

Articles

  • "Narrating Animal Trauma in Bulgakov and Tolstoy." Animal Narratology [Special Issue], ed. Joela Jacobs. Humanities 5(4), 84 (2016).
  • “Teen Drama with a Bite: Human Animality in Jeff Davis’ Teen Wolf.” Supernatural Studies 3.1 (Spring 2016): 65-84.
  • “A Postcolonial Reading of Lesia Ukraïnka’s Orhiia.” Modern Drama 58.1 (Spring 2015): 1-21. (The Association for Theatre in Higher Education’s 2016 Outstanding Article Award & Modern Drama Award for Outstanding Article of 2015)
  • “Aeneas Among the Cossacks: Eneïda in Modern Ukraine.” The Trojan Wars and the Making of the Modern World, ed. Adam J. Goldwyn. Uppsala, Sweden: Studia Graeca Upsalensia, 2015: 91-110.
  • “‘fear them which kill the soul’: Marie Corelli’s Manifesto Against Positivist Education.” Victorians Journal 124 (Fall 2013): 98-123.
  • “A Nilufar by Any Other Name: The Implications of Reading Sadegh Hedayat inTranslation.” Translation and Literature 22 (2013): 215-39.
  • “Accounting for Achilles: Teaching Literature to Non-Majors.” Syllabus 2.1 (2013): 1-10.
  • “‘thoughts die sooner than languages’: The Vitalism of the Literal in Bernard Shaw’s Back to Methuselah.” UpStage 3 (Winter 2012).  

Dr. Lisa Arnold
Assistant Professor & Director of First-Year Writing
PhD Rhetoric and Composition (University of Louisville, 2011)

Office: Minard 318E32
Phone: 701-231-5097
lisa.r.arnold@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Histories of Writing Instruction, Writing Pedagogy, Writing Program Administration, Multilingual and Transnational Literacy Practices

About Dr. Arnold

In August 2015, I moved from Beirut, Lebanon, to Fargo to begin a new position as an Assistant Professor of English and Director of NDSU’s First-Year Writing Program. I held a similar position at the American University of Beirut from 2011-2015. My PhD is in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Louisville, and before that I attended George Mason University (MFA – Creative Writing) and Saint Louis University (BA – English). At NDSU, I teach graduate and undergraduate courses in writing pedagogy, composition history, and rhetoric.

 My research interests include histories of writing instruction worldwide; writing pedagogy and program administration; and multilingual and transnational literacy practices. I have been published in College Composition and Communication, College English, Composition Studies (forthcoming), JAC, and Pedagogy, and I am a co-editor for a forthcoming collection titled Emerging Writing Research from the Middle East-North Africa Region (WAC Clearinghouse, 2016). In Spring 2015, I was awarded the CCCC Richard Braddock Award for the best article published in CCC in 2014. I am currently drafting a book based on my archival research in Beirut, titled An Imagined America: Writing Policies and Practices at the Syrian Protestant College, 1866-1920. In Beirut, I learned a fair amount of Arabic, and I am always looking for conversation partners, so if you live in Fargo and have a background in Arabic, please stop by!

To see my full CV, please visit: https://ndsu.academia.edu/LisaArnold

Recent Publications

Books

  • Emerging Writing Research from the Middle East-North Africa Region. Eds. Lisa Arnold, Anne Nebel, Lynne Ronesi. International Exchanges on the Study of Writing Series. Fort Collins, CO: The WAC Clearinghouse (online) & U P of Colorado (print), January 9, 2017. 12 chapters, 298 pp. Available online at: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/mena/
  • After Words: A Reader for Academic Writing. Eds. Rantisi, Rima, Lisa Arnold, Nate George, Rima Hanna, Najla Jarkas, Jasmina Najjar, and Zane Sinno.Educart (Middle East) Publishing: Beirut, 2012.

Articles and Book Chapters

  • “‘Today the Need Arises’ الیوم†قد†مسّت†الحاجة†: Arabic Student Writing at the Turn of the 20th Century.” Transnational Writing Education: Theory, History, Practice. Ed. Xiaoye You, Routledge (forthcoming 2018). 14 ms. pp.
  • “Introduction.” Emerging Writing Research from the Middle East-North Africa Region. Eds. Lisa Arnold, Lynne Ronesi, and Anne Nebel, The WAC Clearinghouse (online) & U P of Colorado (print), January 9, 2017: 3-24. Available online at: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/mena/intro.pdf
  • “Literacy Narratives Across Borders: Beirut and Dearborn as 21st Century Transnational Spaces.” Emerging Writing Research from the Middle East-North Africa Region. Eds. Lisa Arnold, Lynne Ronesi, and Anne Nebel, The WAC Clearinghouse (online) & U P of Colorado (print), January 9, 2017: 219-240. Available online at: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/mena/chapter10.pdf
  • “Practicing What We Preach: Measured Reflection about Teaching Writing.” Accepted for publication in the Conference Proceedings for the Fourth International Conference on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. (forthcoming) 15 ms. pp.
  • “An Imagined America: Rhetoric and Identity at Syrian Protestant College.” College English 78.6 (2016): 578-601.
  • “This is a Field that’s Open, Not Closed”: Multilingual and International Writing Faculty Respond to Composition Theory.” Composition Studies 44.1 (2016): 72-88.
  • “Recognizing and Disrupting Immappancy in Scholarship and Pedagogy.” Pedagogy 15.2 (2015): 271-302.
  • "‘The Worst Part of the Dead Past’: Language Attitudes and Pedagogies at Syrian Protestant College, 1866-1902.” College Composition and Communication 66.2 (2014): 276-300.
  • “Forum on the Profession.” Special Issue on Contingent Faculty. College English 73.4 (2011): 409-427.
  • “(Re)Working ‘Writing’ and the History of Composition.” Response Essay. JAC 29.1-2 (2009): 259-65.

Dr. Sean Burt
Assistant Professor of English and Religious Studies
PhD Religious Studies (Duke University, 2011)

Office: Minard 422A
Phone: 701-231-8820
Sean.Burt@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Religious Studies, Critical Theory, Bible as Literature, Biblical Poetry, Poetics

About Dr. Burt

Hello! I am an Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in Religious Studies and English. My research interests are in ancient Jewish and Israelite literature, particularly in biblical Hebrew poetry and Persian Period Jewish literature. Much of my research investigates ancient literary form, especially the ways in which the ancient writers themselves engaged with poetic and narrative forms. I am also interested in poetics, reception of the Bible in literature, gender studies of the Hebrew Bible, and science fiction and horror fiction. Among the projects I am currently working on are: a collaborative project with Dr. Elaine James of St. Catherine University on biblical poets’ attitudes towards poetry, an essay on interconnections between Margaret Atwood’s poems and the Hebrew Bible, and a book project on the role of poetry in the Book of Ezekiel.

At NDSU, I teach courses in both Religious Studies (Hebrew Bible, World Religions, History of Judaism, New Testament) and English (Introduction to Poetry; The Bible as Literature; World Literature). I have also taught courses in the First-Year Writing Program and the University Honors Program. 

Recent Publications

Books

  • The Courtier and the Governor: Transformations of Genre in the Nehemiah Memoir. Journal of Ancient Judaism Supplements 17. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2014.

Articles

  • “‘This Is a Lamentation—It Has Become a Lamentation’: Subverting Genre in Ezekiel 19,” in Biblical Poetry and Art of Close Reading, Elaine James and Blake Couey, eds. Cambridge University Press, 2018. 
  • “‘Your Torah is My Delight’: Repetition and the Poetics of Immanence in Psalm 119.” Journal of Biblical Literature (forthcoming).
  • “Essays on Isaiah 24-27, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi,” in “Covenant in the Persian Period,” Steven Schweitzer, ed. Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (forthcoming)

Dr. Adam Goldwyn
Assistant Professor of English
PhD Comparative Literature (CUNY, 2010)

Office: Minard 318H
 Adam.Goldwyn@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching:
 Medieval Literature, Reception Theory, Translation, Byzantine Studies, Byzantine Ecocriticism

About Dr. Goldwyn

Adam J. Goldwyn joined the faculty at NDSU in 2013 as Assistant Professor of Medieval Literature and English. He received his B.A (Pomona College) and M.A. (University College London) in ancient history and his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the City University of New York, where he specialized in medieval literature and Greek literature (ancient, medieval and modern). He wrote his dissertation on the reception of the Trojan War in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, a topic which built on his long-standing interests in classical reception, comparative approaches to medieval literature (particularly the medieval romance) and Mediterranean Studies.

After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Goldwyn taught at the University of New York Tirana in Albania and at the American University in Kosovo (now RIT Kosovo), where he developed an interest in Albanian literature. From 2011-2013, he was a post-doctoral researcher in Byzantine and Greek Studies at Uppsala University (Sweden), where he worked on both the reception of Classical Greek literature in Byzantium and the reception of Byzantine literature in modernity.

Dr. Goldwyn spent the fall semester of 2013 as research fellow at the Swedish Institute in Athens and the academic year 2016/17 as a fellow at Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard’s Center for Byzantine Studies in Washington, DC.

At NDSU, he has taught courses in medieval literature, international modernism, world literature, literature and the environment, and literary theory.

Recent Publications

MONOGRAPH

  • 2017: Byzantine Ecocriticism: Humans, Nature, and Power in the Medieval Greek Romance. Palgrave-MacMillan.

BOOK-LENGTH TRANSLATIONS

  • 2017 (Forthcoming): Tzetzes, John. Allegories of the Odyssey (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library series). Harvard University Press (co-translator Dimitra Kokkini).
  • 2015: Tzetzes, John. Allegories of the Iliad (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library series). Harvard University Press (co-translator Dimitra Kokkini).

EDITED VOLUMES

  • 2018 (Forthcoming): A Handbook to the Late Byzantine Romances. Cambridge University Press (co-editor Ingela Nilsson).
  • 2017: Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Classics in International Modernism and the Avant-Garde. Brill (co-editor James Nikopoulos).
  • 2016: Mediterranean Modernism: Intercultural Exchange and Aesthetic Development. Palgrave-MacMillan (co-editor Renée Silverman).
  • 2015: The Trojan Wars and the Making of the Modern World. Studia Graeca Upsaliensia.

ARTICLES ON BYZANTINE LITERATURE

  • 2016: “The Trojan War from Rome to New Rome: The Reception of Dictys of Crete’s Ephemeris Belli Troiani in Ioannes Malalas’ Chronicle” in Miscellanea Byzantina I. Ed. Marciniak, Przemyslaw. University of Silesia Press, 9-34.
  • 2016: “A Case-Study in Byzantine Ecocriticism: Zoomorphic and Anthomorphic Metaphors in the Medieval Greek Romance.” ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 23.2, 220-239.
  • 2016: “‘Constantinople Our Star’: The Image of Byzantium in Modernist Poetry” in The Reception of Byzantium in European Culture since 1500. Eds. Marcianak, Przemyslaw and Smythe, Dion. Ashgate, 225-243.
  • 2015: “John Malalas and the Origins of the Allegorical and Novelistic Traditions of the Trojan War in Byzantium.” Troianalexandrina 15, 23-49.
  • 2015: “Towards a Byzantine Ecocriticism: Witches and Nature Control in the Medieval Greek Romance.” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 39.1, 66-84.
  • 2014: “‘I come from a cursed land and from the depths of darkness’: Life after death in Greek laments about the fall of Constantinople” in Wanted Byzantium: The Desire for a Lost Empire. Eds. Nilsson, Ingela and Stephenson, Paul. Studia Byzantina Upsaliensia, 93-108.
  • 2012: “Arthur in the East: Cross-Cultural Translations of Arthurian Romance in Greek and Hebrew, with a New Translation of Ὁ Πρεσβύς Ἱπποτές/The Old Knight.” LATCH: The Journal of Literary Artifacts in Theory, Culture and History 5, 75-105.

ARTICLES ON MODERN GREEK LITERATURE

  • 2017: “‘The Virtue of Hellenism’: Yoram Bronowski’s Hebrew Translations of Constantine Cavafy and Israel’s Mediterranean Identity.” Journal of Mediterranean Studies.
  • 2016: “An ‘Exile from the Sea with the Desert in his Mouth’: A Conversation with Iossif Ventura.” World Literature Today 90.1, 22-25.
  • 2015: “Joseph Eliyia and the Jewish Question in Greece: Zionism, Hellenism and the Struggle for Modernity.” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 33.2, 361-384.
  • 2012: “Translations and Adaptations of C.P. Cavafy in Albanian.” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 30.2, 247-276.

ARTICLES ON CLASSICAL RECEPTION

  • 2017: “Creating the Modern Rhapsode: The Classics as World Literature in Ezra Pound’s Cantos” in Brill’s Companion to Classical Receptions in International Modernism and the Avant-Garde. Ed. Goldwyn, Adam J. and Nikopoulos, James. Brill, 53-72.
  • 2015: “Achaians, Athenians and Americans: Comparing Empires in The New York Times in the Post-9/11 Era” in The Trojan Wars and the Making of the Modern World. Ed. Goldwyn, Adam J. Studia Graeca Upsaliensia, 245-258.
  • 2015: “‘That Men to Come Shall Know of It’: Theorizing Aesthetic Innovation, Heroic Ideology, and Political Legitimacy in Trojan War Reception” in The Trojan Wars and the Making of the Modern World. Ed. Goldwyn, Adam J. Studia Graeca Upsalensia, 1-15.

ARTICLES ON ALBANIAN LITERATURE

  • 2016: “‘Go Back to Homer’s Verse’: Iliads of revolution and Odysseys of exile in Albanian Poetry.” Classical Receptions Journal 8.4, 506-528.
  • 2016: “Modernism, Nationalism, Albanianism: Geographic Poetry and Poetic Geography in the Albanian and Kosovar Independence Movements” in Mediterranean Modernism: Intercultural Exchange and Aesthetic Development. Eds. Goldwyn, Adam J. and Silverman, Renee. Palgrave-MacMillan (New Mediterranean Studies), 251-281.
  • 2012: “Finally, Ali Podrimja Spoke: A Conversation.” World Literature Today 86.3, 28-32. (co-author Rineta Hoxha).
  • 2011: “Exile and Nostalgia in Albanian Lyric Poetry since 1750.” Mediterranean Journal of Humanities 1, 123-141.

Dr. Alison Graham-Bertolini
Assistant Professor of English
PhD English Literature (Louisiana State University, 2009)

Office: 
Minard 318E44
Phone: 701-231-7175
 Alison.Bertolini@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Contemporary American Literature, Gender Studies, Ethnic Literature, Postcolonial Literature, Women's Studies

About Dr. Graham-Bertolini

I joined the NDSU faculty in a joint appointment with English and Women and Gender Studies. I earned my Master’s of Liberal Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania, and received my doctorate in English Literature from Louisiana State University (LSU) in 2009. 

After finishing my PhD I taught at LSU and Tulane University in New Orleans as a postdoctoral fellow. My first book, Vigilante Women in Contemporary American Fiction, was published by Palgrave Macmillan Press in September, 2011.

My academic interests include contemporary American and post-colonial literature, with a focus on race and gender. I have published articles in the Eudora Welty Review, The Southern Quarterly, and in collections including Southern Exposures: Locations and Relocations of Italian Culture (eds. Alan J. Gravano and Ilaria Serra. Bordighera Press, 2012) and Indian-American Writers: Transnationalisms and Diasporas (eds. Jaspal K. Singh, and Rajendra Chetty. Peter Lang Publishers, 2010).

Recent Publications

Books

  • Carson McCullers in the Twenty-First Century. Graham-Bertolini, Alison, and Casey Kayser, eds. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, November (2016).
  • Vigilante Women in American Fiction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, September (2011). 

Introductions

  • "Preface." Carson McCullers in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, November (2016).

Book Chapters

  • "Terror Viscous: The Reimagined Gothic in Karen Russel's Swamplandia." Swamp Souths: Literary and Cultural Ecologies. Eds. Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, Kirstin Squint, and Anthony Wilson. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State U Press. (Forthcoming, 2018).
  • "Nature is not abnormal; only lifelessness is abnormal": Paradigms of the In-valid in Reflections in a Golden Eye." Carson McCullers in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, November (2016).
  • "Based on Actual Events: The Lynching of Italian American Immigrants in Tallulah, LA, as depicted by Donna Jo Napoli in Alligator Bayou." Southern Exposures: Locations and Relocations of Italian Culture. Eds. Alan J. Gravano and Ilaria Serra. New York: Italian American Studies Association (2012): 46-57.
  • "The Advantage of Estrangement in Mukherjee's Jasmine." Indian-American Writers: Transnationalisms and Diasporas. Eds. Jaspal K. Singh, and Rajendra Chetty. New York: Peter Lang Publishers (2010).

Journal Articles

  • "Marilyn Chin's Revenge: Rewriting the Racial Shadow." Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association. Spring 2017.
  • "Finding the Extraordinary in Welty's 'Music from Spain'." Eudora Welty Review. Vol 7, Spring (2015). 79-92.
  • "'Broad and slow and yellow': Navigating Precarity in Shirley Ann Grau's Mississippi River." Southern Quarterly. Vol. 52.3, Spring (2015). 83-97.
  • "No Life Less Worthy: The Posthumanist Framework of Aravind Adiga's The White Tiger." South Asian Review. Vol. 34.2, October (2013): 11-26.
  • "Searching for the Garnet Pin: Confluence as Narrative Technique in Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding." Eudora Welty Review. Vol 5, Spring (2013).
  • "The Decentering of the Male in 'Gal Young Un'."Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Journal of Florida Literature XIV (2006): 27-36.
  • "The 'Becoming' of Woolf's Orlando." In-between: Essays & Studies in Literary Criticism 14.2 (2005): 153-65.
  • "Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and the Reckoning of Ideology." The Southern Quarterly 43.1, Fall (2005): 49-62.
  • "Joe Millionaire as Fairy Tale: A Feminist Critique." Feminist Media Studies Routledge/Taylor and Francis, 4.3 (2004): 341-4.

Creative Publications

  • "Baking Bread." Fargo Reality Benders Cancer Collection. Forthcoming, Summer 2018.
  • "How to Cultivate a Cat Lover." Passion for Cats. Green Gecko Publishing. 2015. 88-92. Online.

Dr. Holly Hassel
Professor of English

PhD Rhetoric and Composition (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2002)

Office: Minard 318 E46
holly.hassel@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Writing Program Administration, Writing Assessment, Feminist Pedagogy, Placement, First-Year Writing, The Profession

About Dr. Hassel

I earned my PHD in English from the University-Nebraska-Lincoln in 2002, and am currently a Professor of English and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Marathon County in Wausau, WI. My scholarly work is pedagogical in nature, focusing on teaching and learning in first-year writing and introductory women’s and gender studies classrooms.

As a first-generation college graduate, I am particularly passionate about the social justice function of two-year college English and supporting the successful transition of all students to college writing classrooms. My scholarly work has been published in College Composition and Communication, Feminist Teacher, College English, Pedagogy, Teaching and Learning Inquiry, WPA: Writing Program Administration, and Teaching English in the Two-Year College, among others. From 2013-2016, I authored the regular feature “Inquiry” in Teaching English in the Two-Year College, an introduction to systematic inquiry into student learning aimed at two-year college English teachers.

My most recent books include Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership (co-edited with Kirsti Cole, Routledge, 2017) and the second edition of Threshold Concepts in Women’s and Gender Studies: Ways of Seeing, Thinking, and Knowing, a textbook for introductory women’s and gender studies courses co-authored with Dr. Christie Launius (Routledge, 2018). I have served as editor of Teaching English in the Two-Year College, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published through the National Council of Teachers of English, since 2016. I have also delighted in translating my love of Harry Potter by serving with my colleague Jill Stukenberg as co-Headmistress of the annual, week-long summer academic camp for kids, Wizarding Academy, a Hogwarts immersion experience.  

I am thrilled to be joining the English department and its program in Writing, Rhetoric, and Culture at NDSU, and look forward to continuing my work in two-year college English by helping prepare new instructors for teaching in these rewarding educational contexts. I am excited to build partnerships with local two-year college colleagues, to furthering the work that is happening in the field on graduate preparation of two-year college English teachers (see the September 2017 special issue of TETYC on this topic!), and continuing my teaching and research interests on writing assessment, placement of students in first-year writing and learning support courses, the profession, threshold concepts in writing studies (particularly first-year writing) and faculty leadership. 

On a personal note, the position at NDSU brings me closer to my home stomping grounds in Northern Minnesota (having grown up in Brainerd). In my free time, I enjoy running, yoga, fabric arts (quilting, embroidery, and knitting), science fiction and fantasy films, playing guitar, and spending time with my husband, Ben Schultz, and two children Trixie (12) and Gus (7).

Recent Publications

Books 

  • Hassel, Holly, Christie Launius, and Susan Rensing. Socially Engaged Classrooms: A Guide to Teaching Introductory Women’s and Gender Studies. Under contract with Palgrave McMillan. 
  • Hassel, Holly, and Cassandra Phillips. Materiality and Writing Studies: Aligning Labor, Scholarship, and Teaching. Book-length manuscript. Under review. 
  • Cole, Kirsti and Holly Hassel. Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership. Routledge. 2017. 
  • Clasen, Tricia and Holly Hassel, eds. Gendered Identities: Rereading Gender in Children’s and Young Adult Literature. New York: Routledge, 2016. 
  • Launius, Christie and Holly Hassel. Ways of Thinking, Seeing, and Knowing: Threshold Concepts in Women’s and Gender Studies. Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies textbook. Routledge, 2015. Second edition in preparation for publication in 2018. 
  • Adney, Karley and Holly Hassel. Critical Companion to J.K. Rowling. Facts on File, 2010. 

Editing 

  • Cole, Kirsti and Holly Hassel. Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership. Routledge. 2017. 
  • Clasen, Tricia and Holly Hassel, eds. Gendered Identities: Rereading Gender in Children’s and Young Adult Literature. New York: Routledge, 2016. 
  • Editor, Teaching English in the Two-Year College. Peer-Reviewed journal published by the National Council of Teachers of English. 2016 to present. 
  • Associate Editor, Teaching English in the Two-Year College. Peer-Reviewed journal published by the National Council of Teachers of English. 2013 to 2015. 

Journal Articles 

  • Hassel, Holly, Mark Reynolds, Jeff Sommers, and Howard Tinberg. “Editing at the Intersection: TETYC as a Site of Disciplinary Crossroads,” accepted for inclusion in special issue of College English, April 2019. 
  • Katie Kalish, Holly Hassel, Cassie Phillips, Jennifer Heinert, and Joanne Giordano. “Inequitable Austerity: Pedagogies of Resilience and Resistance in Composition.” Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture. In press, 2019. 
  • Joanne Giordano, Holly Hassel, Jessica Nastal-Dema, Christie Toth. “Writing Assessment, Placement, and the Two-Year College.” Journal of Writing Assessment. Special Issue on Placement in Two-Year Colleges. Vol 11, no. 2. November 2018. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Christie Launius. “Crossing the Threshold in Introductory Women’s and Gender Studies Courses: An Assessment of Student Learning." Teaching and Learning Inquiry, vol. 5, no. 2, Sept. 2017, pp. 30-46. 
  • Kristen Seas, Jennifer Heinert, Cassandra Phillips, and Holly Hassel. “‘Flexible’ Learning, Disciplinarity, and First-Year Writing: Critically Engaging Competency-Based Education.” WPA: The Journal of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, vol. 40, no. 1, Fall 2016, pp. 10-32. 
  • Giordano, Joanne Baird and Holly Hassel. “Unpredictable Journeys: Academically At-Risk Students, Developmental Education Reform, and the Two-Year College.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 43, no. 4, May 2016, pp. 371-390. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Joanne Baird Giordano. “The Blurry Borders of College Writing: Remediation and the Assessment of Student Readiness.” College English, vol. 78, no. 1, September 2015, pp. 56-80. 
  • Adams, Heather Brook, Holly Hassel, Hyoejin Yoon, and Jes Rucki. “Key Concept: Service.” Peitho: A Journal of the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Composition and Rhetoric. Spring 2015 Special Issue. 
  • Hassel, Holly, et al. “White Paper on Developmental Education Reform.” Co-authored as co-chair of the Two-Year College Association Research Committee. Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 42, no. 3, March 2015, pp. 326-342. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Joanne Baird Giordano and. “Occupy Writing Studies: A Redefinition of College Composition by the Teaching Majority.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 65, no. 1, Sept. 2013, pp. 117-139. 
  • Hassel, Holly. “Research Gaps in Teaching English in the Two-Year College.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College. vol 40, no. 4, May 2013, pp. 343-363. 
  • Hassel, Holly, Amy Reddinger, and Jessica van Slooten. “Surfacing the Structures of Patriarchy: Teaching and Learning Threshold Concepts in Women's Studies.” International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, vol. 5, no. 2, 2011. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Joanne Giordano. “FYC Placement at Open-Admission, Two-Year Campuses: Changing Campus Culture, Institutional Practice, and Student Success.” Open Words: Access and English Studies, vol. 5, no. 2 Fall 2011, pp. 29-59. 
  • Arnold, Lisa, Laura Brady, Maggie Christensen, Joanne Giordano, Holly Hassel, Ed Nagelhout, Nathalie Singh-Corcoran, and Julie Staggers. “Forum on the Profession.” Special edited issue of College English on the role of contingent faculty in the profession. Eds. Mike Palmquist and Sue Doe, vol. 73, no. March 2011, pp. 409-427. 
  • Chick, Nancy and Holly Hassel. “’Don’t Hate Me Because I’m Virtual’: Feminist Pedagogy in the Online Classroom.” Feminist Teacher, vol. 19, no. 3, 2009, pp. 195- 215. 
  • Chick, Nancy, Holly Hassel, and Aeron Haynie. “‘Pressing an Ear Against the Hive’: A Lesson Study on Reading Literature for Complexity.” Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture vol. 9, no. 3, September 2009, pp. 399-422. 
  • Hassel, Holly, and Joanne Giordano. “Transfer Institutions, Transfer of Knowledge: The Development of Rhetorical Adaptability and Underprepared Writers.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol 37, no. 1, 2009, 24-40. 
  • Hassel, Holly. "Intellectual Loves Rube!": Class, Gender, and Alcohol in Jean Stafford's "Children Are Bored on Sunday." Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, vol. 37, no. 7, 2008): 815-832. 
  • Beck, Terrell, Nancy Chick, Holly Hassel, Aeron Haynie, and Bryan Kopp. “Reading for Complexity: A Lesson Study in Literary Studies.” Teaching Forum. March, 2007 www.uwlax.edu/teachingforum. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Jessica Lourey. “The Dea(r)th of Student Responsibility.” College Teaching. 45.1 (2005): 2-13. 

Book Chapters 

  • Giordano, Joanne Baird and Holly Hassel. “Strategic Direction: Transforming Professional Organizations to Support Two-Year College Teacher-Scholars.” Accepted for inclusion in Profession and Politics of Teaching English in the Two-Year College, edited by Darin Jensen and Brett Griffiths. 
  • Cassandra Phillips, Holly Hassel, Jennifer Heinert, Katie Kalish, and Joanne Baird Giordano, “Thinking Like a Writer: Threshold Concepts and First-Year Writers in Open-Admissions Classrooms.” In Considering What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies, eds. Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle. Under contract with Utah State UP. 
  • Mattis, Ann, Amy Reddinger, Jessica van Slooten, and Holly Hassel. “Assessing Student Learning in WGS: Curricular and Faculty Development in the Two-Year College.” Theory and Praxis: Women’s and Gender Studies in the Community College. Ed. Genevieve Carminati and Heather Relihan. 
  • Cole, Kirsti, Holly Hassel, and Eileen Schell. “Remodeling Shared Governance: Feminist Decision-Making and Resistance to Academic Neoliberalism" by Kirsti Cole, Holly Hassel, and Eileen Schell.” In Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership. Routledge, 2017. 
  • Hassel, Holly, Joanne Baird Giordano, Jennifer Heinert, and Cassie Phillips. “Student Retention and Professional Development in Two-Year College English Departments.” In Retention, Persistence, and Writing Programs. Eds. Todd Ruecker, Dawn Shepherd, Heidi Estrem, and Beth Brunk Chavez. Utah State University Press, 2017. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Joanne Giordano. “Contingency, Access, and the Material Conditions of Teaching and Learning in the “Statement of Principles,” Labored: The State(ment) and Future of Work in Composition edited by Randall McClure, Dayna V. Goldstein, and Michael A. Pemberton Parlor P, 2017. 
  • Hassel, Holly. “Introduction.” In Gendered Identities: Rereading Gender in Children’s and Young Adult Literature. Tricia Clasen and Holly Hassel, eds. New York: Routledge, 2016. 
  • Giordano, Joanne Baird and Holly Hassel. "Critical Reading, Rhetorical Analysis, and Source-Based Writing." In Teaching U.S.-Educated Multilingual Writers: Pedagogical Practices from and for the Classroom. Eds. Mark Roberge, Kay M. Losey, and Margi Wald. U of Michigan P, 2015. Print. 244-262. 
  • Lem, Ellyn and Holly Hassel. "'Killer' Katniss and 'Loverboy' Peeta: Hunger Games' Defiance of Gender-Genred Reading." In Of Bread, Blood and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy. Eds. Mary Pharr and Leisa Clark. McFarland Press. 2012. 118-127. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Nerissa Nelson. “A Signature Feminist Pedagogy: Connection and Transformation in Women’s Studies.” In Exploring More Signature Pedagogies. Eds. Nancy L. Chick, Regan Gurung, and Aeron Haynie. Stylus Press, 2012. 143-155. 
  • Hassel, Holly and Nancy Chick. “It Always Ends the Same”: Paternal Failures.” Looking for Lost: Critical Essays on the Enigmatic Series. Ed. Randy LaistMcFarland Press. Ed., 2011. 154-170. 
  • Hassel, Holly. “Susan Murphy, Ginormica, and Gloria Steinem: Feminist Consciousness-Raising as Science Fiction in PDI/Dream Works Monsters vs. Aliens.” In The Galaxy Is Rated GEssays on Children’s Science Fiction Film and Television. Ed. R.C. Neighbors and Sandy Rankin. McFarland P. 2011. 31-51. 
  • Hassel, Holly. ’I can’t get no girlie action’: The Illusion of Inclusion in 1990s American Action Films, or ‘The Babe Scientist” Phenomenon.’” Chick Flicks: Contemporary Women at the Movies. Eds. Suzanne Ferris and Mallory Young. Routledge Press, 2007. 

Editorial Introductions and Journal Columns as Associate Editor of Teaching English in the Two-Year College 

  • Lynch-Biniek, Amy and Holly Hassel. "Col(labor)ation: Academic Freedom, Working Conditions, and the Teaching of College English," Teaching English in the Two-Year College and Forum, vol. 45, no. 4, May 2018, 333-337. 
  • “Inquiry: Presenting Your Work: Strategies for Dissemination.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 43. No. 4, May 2016. 
  • "Inquiry: Making Your Work Relevant." Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 43, no. 3, March 2016, pp. 316-318. 
  • "Inquiry; Analyzing Evidence with Rubrics." Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 43, no. 5, Dec. 2015, pp. 202-204, 2015. 
  • "Inquiry: Using Rubrics for Assessing Evidence of Student Learning." Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 43, no. 5, September, 2015, pp. 84-88. 
  • “Inquiry: What Is Evidence of Student Learning?” Teaching English in the Two-Year College. March 2015 
  • “Inquiry: Conducting a Lesson Study Project.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 42, no. 2, Dec. 2014. 
  • “Inquiry: Lesson Study as a Method of Inquiry: An Introduction.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College.” September 2014. 
  • “Inquiry: The Ethical Dimensions of Systematic Inquiry.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College. 41.4. (May 2014): 404-407. 
  • “Inquiry: Starting with a Question.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 41, no 3, (March 2014), pp. 300-303. 
  • “Inquiry: A Brief History of SoTL.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 41, no 2, Dec. 2013, pp. 178-181. 
  • “Inquiry: Looking at Learning Systematically.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College. V.I September 2013): 56-60. 

Dr. Daniel Kenzie
Visiting Assistant Professor of English

PhD Rhetoric and Composition (Purdue University, 2017)

Office: Minard 318 E42
Daniel.P.Kenzie@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Rhetoric & Composition, Professional & Technical Writing, Rhetoric of Health & Medicine, Disability Studies

About Dr. Kenzie

I joined the faculty as a Visiting Assistant Professor of English in Fall 2017, after completing my PhD and MA degrees in English/Rhetoric and Composition at Purdue University. I received my BA in English from Western Michigan University.

I teach in NDSU's upper division writing program, including Researching and Writing Grants and Proposals, Writing in the Sciences, Writing in the Health Professions, and Writing in the Technical Professions.

My research interests include professional and technical writing, the rhetoric of health and medicine, and disability studies. My recent work has been published in Technical Communication Quarterly and the WAC Journal.

Website: http://danielkenzie.com

Recent Publications

Articles

  • Kenzie, Daniel, and Mary McCall. “Teaching Writing for the Health Professions: Disciplinary Intersections and Pedagogical Practice.” Accepted for special issue of Technical Communication Quarterly, forthcoming Winter 2018.
  • Sánchez, Fernando, and Daniel Kenzie. “Of Evolutions and Mutations: Assessment as Tactics for Action in WAC Partnerships.” The WAC Journal, vol. 27, 2016, pp. 119-141. http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol27/sanchez.pdf
  • Kenzie, Daniel. “What We Know and How We Know It: Responses to Failure of Clinical Trials for Progesterone as a Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury.” Under review at a peer-reviewed journal.
  • Dykema, Meghan, Kim Ballard, Patrick Love and Daniel Kenzie. "Lessons in Graphica." Classroom Notes Plus, vol. 28, no. 4, 2011.

Dr. Mary McCall
Assistant Professor of English

PhD Rhetoric and Composition (Purdue University, 2017)

Office: Minard 318 E36
Mary.McCall@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Rhetoric & Composition, Usability & User Experience, Professional & Technical Writing, Writing Across the Curriculum, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

About Dr. McCall

In August 2017, I joined the NDSU faculty as an Assistant Professor of English in Professional/Technical/Scientific Rhetoric and Writing. I received my PhD and MA degrees in rhetoric and composition at Purdue University and my BA in English with a minor in creative writing at Fairfield University.

My research interests include professional and technical writing, writing across the curriculum, and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, with an emphasis on the intersections between gender and identity development within engineering. I am currently teaching courses in introduction to writing studies and usability and user experience.

Website: https://marymccall.org

Recent Publications

Articles

  • Forthcoming Winter 2018: “Quantification of Engineering Disciplinary Discourse in Résumés: A Novel Genre Analysis with Teaching Implications.” IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication. Co-authored with Gracemarie Mike Fillenwarth and Catherine G.P. Berdanier.
  • “Bridging the Divide: Integrating Composition and Second Language Writing Approaches to Transfer.” Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing, vol. 4, 2016, pp. 1-14.
  • “First Year Composition through a Global Engineering Perspective.” Connexions: International Professional Communication Journal, vol. 1, no. 2, 2013, pp. 109-133. Co-authored with Matthew Allen and Gracemarie Mike.
  • “Record and Reflect: iPod Use in Writing Center Staff Development.” Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, vol. 6, no. 1, Fall 2008. Co-authored with Elizabeth Boquet, Betsy A. Bowen, Catherine Forsa, and Devin Hagan.

Dr. Bruce Maylath
Professor of English & Director of Upper-Division Writing

PhD Rhetoric and Composition (University of Minnesota, 1994)

Office: Minard 318E20

Phone: 701-231-7176
Bruce.Maylath@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching:Composition, International Technical Communication, Sociolinguistics, Translation

About Dr. Maylath

Joining the NDSU English Department as a professor in fall 2007, Bruce Maylath earned his degrees in English at Kalamazoo College (BA, 1980), Michigan State University (MA, 1987), and the University of Minnesota (PhD, 1994). He also studied Norwegian language and literature at the University of Oslo, both as an undergraduate (1978) and graduate student (1980-81). His interests range from Ibsen’s messages in naming characters to the continuing legacy of the Norman Conquest on writing assessment today to translation issues in technical documentation and to the efficacy of cross-cultural virtual teams assembled with writers, translators, and usability testers. Currently at NDSU, he serves as director of upper-division writing.

With his University of Oslo classmate Sonia Vandepitte, professor at Ghent University, in Belgium, Dr. Maylath is the co-founder of the Trans-Atlantic & Pacific Project (TAPP), which has linked students in writing, translation, and usability courses across four continents since the 1999-2000 academic year. He continues to serve as the TAPP network’s coordinator. For his work in this area and others, he has been named a Fellow of the Association of Teachers of Writing, honored with the IEEE Professional Communication Society’s Ronald S. Blicq Award for Distinction in Technical Communication Education, and granted NDSU’s Faculty Lectureship for “sustained professional excellence in teaching, scholarly achievement, and service.”

Before coming to NDSU, Dr. Maylath began his teaching career at the middle and high school levels in Michigan, moved on to community colleges there, and, after graduate school, joined the faculty at the University of Memphis. Moving back north, he helped found, in 2000, the University of Wisconsin—Stout’s Program in Technical Communication (now titled Professional Communication & Emerging Media), serving as its initial director until 2007. As vice-president, and later president, of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication, he helped establish the CPTSC/ATTW Roundtable series in Europe, starting in London in 2000 and continuing in Milan in 2003 and Limerick in 2005, then moving to Montreal in 2008 and to Eschede, the Netherlands, in 2010. He has served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication and currently serves on the advisory boards of the journals Fachsprache and Programmatic Perspectives.

His current research takes up translation issues in technical and professional communication. His best-known book chapters appear in Carolyn Rude’s Technical Editing, 3rd & 4th eds., and Deborah S. Bosley’s Global Contexts: Case Studies in International Technical Communication. Books he has co-edited include Approaches to Teaching Non-Native English Speakers across the Curriculum (Jossey-Bass, 1997) and Language Awareness: A History and Implementations (Amsterdam University Press, 2000), and Revisiting the Past through Rhetorics of Memory and Amnesia (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010). Other publications appear in the Journal for Business and Technical Communication, Journal of Technical Writing & Communication, IEEE-Transactions on Professional Communication, Technical Communication Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, and numerous other journals and books. More recently, he has co-edited a special issue on translation and international professional communication for the online international professional communication journal connexions. Currently, with Birthe Mousten, Elisabet Arnó-Macià, and Sonia Vandepitte, he is co-editing the IGI Global Handbook of Research on Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments and, with Kirk St. Amant, Translation & Localization.

Dr. Maylath's teaching philosophy has been shaped by many influences, among them Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Mina Shaughnessy's Errors and Expectations, Peter Elbow's Writing with Power, Ken Macrorie's Uptaught (assigned as part of his undergraduate secondary English teaching methods course), Louise Rosenblatt’s The Reader, the Text, the Poem, and perhaps most by his faculty advisor at Michigan State University, Stephen Tchudi, and dissertation director at the University of Minnesota, Chris Anson. With these sources in mind as a doctoral student, he developed a method of teaching writing that he dubbed the Publications Approach. In it, students form editorial boards, solicit articles from each other, review and then accept or reject the submissions, work with authors in editing the articles, and finally format and publish them in their own magazines, which they distribute (today in PDF) to the class by semester's end. Learning achieves a momentum of its own when learners are given the opportunity to create a tangible product. As Andrea Lunsford has noted, when teachers relinquish the role of editor to students, they gain the practice they need to become better writers and editors of their own texts. During the process of the Publication Approach, whose next-step pedagogy Parker Palmer would recognize, each communication between author and editors is drafted in the form of an e-mailed memorandum. This "workaday writing" (to use Tchudi's phrase), applied to the writing process of formal articles, has in Dr. Maylath's experience led to students' better understanding of how to assess the needs of their readers and meet these needs through a deliberate, negotiated process.

The same holds in Dr. Maylath's teaching of technical writing. With a combined focus on process and product with readers at the center, he devised a method of teaching students how to write instructions for a North American audience, then prepare the text in English for translation. North American students then e-mail their texts to students studying translation and/or usability testing at universities within the TAPP network. The translation students then translate their American partners' texts. As they do, they send questions that they have about ambiguous, confusing, or unclear passages to writers for clarification. Dr. Maylath has involved more than a score of instructors and hundreds of classes on the four continents in the network first known as the Trans-Atlantic Project and subsequently, with growth, the Trans-Atlantic & Pacific Project. All of the writing instructors have reported that the greatest benefit to their writing students comes when readers dependent on the writers' texts identify ambiguities and raise questions for clarifications. The transaction between writer, text, and reader that Rosenblatt described becomes palpable in these realistic scenarios.

Courses Taught:
ENGL-209 Introduction to Linguistics (fall semesters)
ENGL-321 Writing in the Technical Professions
ENGL-360 Grammatical Structures/English (spring semesters)
ENGL-452/652 History of the English Language (spring semesters in even-numbered years)
ENGL-453/653 Social and Regional Varieties of English (spring semesters in odd-numbered years)
ENGL-455/655 International Technical Writing (fall semesters in even-numbered years)

Bruce Maylath CV

Recent Publications

Books

  • Translation & Localization. Ed. Bruce Maylath and Kirk St.Amant. Routledge/Taylor & Francis (in press). 
  • Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments. Ed. Birthe Mousten, Sonia Vandepitte, Elisabet Arnó, and Bruce Maylath. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2018.
  • Special Issue: Translation and International Professional Communication: Building Bridges and Strengthening Skills. connexions: International Professional Communication Journal 3.2 (2016). Ed. Bruce Maylath, Marta Pacheco Pinto, and Ricardo Muñoz Martín.
  • Revisiting the Past through Rhetorics of Memory and Amnesia: Selected Papers from the 50th Meeting of the Linguistic Circle of Manitoba and North Dakota. Ed. Dale Sullivan, Bruce Maylath, and Russel Hirst. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010.
  • Language Awareness: A History and Implementations. Ed. Lana J. White, Bruce Maylath, Anthony Adams, and Michel Couzijn. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2000.
  • Approaches to Teaching Non-Native English Speakers across the Curriculum. Ed. David Sigsbee, Bruce W. Speck, and Bruce Maylath. New Directions for Teaching and Learning 70. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.
  • Managing Change and Growth in Technical and Scientific Communication. Proceedings of the 28th Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication, 11-13 October 2001. Ed. Bruce Maylath (Pittsburgh: CPTSC, 2002).
  • Models for Strategic Program Development. Proceedings of the 27th Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication, 19-21 October 2000. Ed. Bruce Maylath (Pittsburgh: CPTSC, 2001).

Articles, Book Chapters, Reviews, and Podcasts

  • Tzoannopoulou, Marina, and Bruce Maylath. "Virtual Networks in English-for-Specific-Purposes Education: A Translation-Reviewing/Editing Model." Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments. Ed. Birthe Mousten, Sonia Vandepitte, Elisabet Arnó, and Bruce Maylath. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2018. 318-343.
  • Mousten, Birthe, Sonia Vandepitte, Elisabet Arnó, and Bruce Maylath. "Preface." Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments. Ed. Birthe Mousten, Sonia Vandepitte, Elisabet Arnó, and Bruce Maylath. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2018. xv-xxi. 
  • Steinmann, Heather, Ruslan Saduov, and Bruce Maylath. "Learning across Borders: A Teaching Case Connecting Writing Students Internationally." Konin Language Studies 3 (2016): 271-287.
  • Vandepitte, Sonia, Bruce Maylath, Birthe Mousten, Suvi Isohella, and Patricia Minacori. "Multilateral Collaboration between Technical Communicators and Translators: A Case Study of New Technologies and Processes." The Journal of Specialised Translation 26 (2016): 3-19.
  • Maylath, Bruce, and Steven Hammer. "The Imperative of Teaching Linguistics to Twenty-First-Century Professional Communicators." Teaching Culture and Communication in Global Contexts. Ed. Kirk St. Amant and Madelyn Flammia. Piscataway, NJ: Wiley-IEEE Press, 2016. 3-18.
  • Lisaité, Donata, Sonia Vandepitte, Bruce Maylath, Birthe Mousten, Susana Valdez, Maria Castel-Branco, and Patricia Minacori. "Negotiating Meaning at a Distance: Peer Feedback in Electronic Learning Translation Environments." Translation and Meaning. Ed. Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk and Łukasz Bogucki. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2016. 99-113. Łódź Studies in Language, New Series, vol. 1.
  • Maylath, Bruce, Marta Pacheco Pinto, and Ricardo Muñoz Martín. "Translation and International Professional Communication: Building Bridges and Strengthening Skills." Translation and International Professional Communication: Building Bridges and Strengthening Skills. Spec. issue of connexions: International Professional Communication Journal 3.2 (2016): 3-9.
  • Sorensen, Karen, Steven Hammer, and Bruce Maylath. "Synchronous and Asynchronous Online International Collaboration: The Trans-Atlantic & Pacific Project." connexions: International Professional Communication Journal 3.1 (2015): 153-177.
  • Vandepitte, Sonia, Birthe Mousten, Bruce Maylath, Suvi Isohella, Maria Teresa Musacchio, and Giuseppe Palumbo. "Translation Competence: Research Data in Multilateral and Interprofessional Collaborative Learning." Handbook of Research on Teaching Methods in Language Translation and Interpretation. Ed. Ying Cui and Wei Zhao. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015. 137-159.
  • Arnó Macià, Elisabet, Suvi Isohella, Bruce Maylath, Tatjana Schell, Massimo Verzella, Patricia Minacori, Birthe Mousten, Maria Teresa Musacchio, Giuseppe Palumbo, Sonia Vandepitte. "Enhancing Students' Skills in Technical Writing and LSP Translation through Tele-Collaboration Projects: Teaching Students in Seven Nations to Manage Complexity in Multilateral International Collaboration." Languages for Special Purposes in a Multilingual, Transcultural World. Proceedings of the 19th European Symposium on Languages for Special Purposes, 8-10 July 2013. Ed. Gerhard Budin and Vesna Lušicky. Vienna, Austria: 2014. Web.
  • Hammer, Steven, and Bruce Maylath. "Real Time and Social Media in Trans-Atlantic Writing/Translation and Translation/Editing Projects." Emerging Pedagogies in the Networked Knowledge Society: Practices Integrating Social Media and Globalization. Ed. Marohang Limbu and Binod Gurung. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2014. 144-161.
  • Andrews, Deborah, Stephen Bernhardt, Kelli Cargile Cook, Jeff Grabill, Bruce Maylath, Daniel Riordan, and Stuart Selber. "Tracing the Intellectual Trajectories of Professional/Technical/Scientific Communication: A Roundtable Perspective from Seven CPTSC Past Presidents." Sharing Our Intellectual Traces: Narrative Reflections from Administrators of Professional, Technical, and Scientific Communication Programs. Ed. Tracy Bridgeford, Karla Saari Kitalong, and Bill Williamson. Amityville, NY: Baywood Publishing, 2013. 11-35.
  • Maylath, Bruce, and Abigail Bakke. Rev. of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement, by Jean M. Twenge and W. Keith Campbell. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication 43.4 (2013): 462-468.
  • Maylath, Bruce, Tym King, and Elisabet Arnó Macià. "Linking Engineering Students in Spain and Technical Writing Students in the US as Coauthors: The Challenge and Outcomes of Subject-Matter Experts and Language Specialists Collaborating Internationally." connexions: International Professional Communication Journal 1.2 (2013): 150-185. 
  • Maylath, Bruce. "Current Trends in Translation." Communication and Language at Work 1.2 (2013): 41-50.
  • Maylath, Bruce, Sonia Vandepitte, Patricia Minacori, Suvi Isohella, Birthe Mousten, and John Humbley. "Managing Complexity: A Technical Communication/Translation Case Study in Multilateral International Collaboration." Technical Communication Quarterly 22 (2013): 67-84.
  • Mousten, Birthe, John Humbley, Bruce Maylath, Sonia Vandepitte. "Communicating Pragmatics about Content and Culture in Virtually Mediated Educational Environments." Computer-Mediated Communication across Cultures: International Interactions in Online Environments. Ed. Kirk St. Amant and Sigrid Kelsey. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2012. 312-327.
  • Maylath, Bruce. "Language and Power," President's Opening Address. Proceedings of the Linguistic Circle of Manitoba and North Dakota, 23-24 Sept. 2011. Ed. Chandice Johnson. Winnipeg: LCMND, 2012. Web.
  • Gnecchi, Marusca, Bruce Maylath, Federica Scarpa, Birthe Mousten, and Sonia Vandepitte. "Field Convergence: Merging Roles of Technical Writers and Technical Translators." IEEE-Transactions on Professional Communication 54 (2011): 168-184.
  • Mousten, Birthe, Bruce Maylath, Sonia Vandepitte, and John Humbley. "Learning Localization through Trans-Atlantic Collaboration: Bridging the Gap between Professions." IEEE-Transactions on Professional Communication 53 (2010): 401-411.
  • Maylath, Bruce. "The Words That Jog Our Memories-and Those That Don't," Revisiting the Past through Rhetorics of Memory and Amnesia: Selected Papers from the 50th Meeting of the Linguistic Circle of Manitoba and North Dakota. Ed. Dale Sullivan, Bruce Maylath, and Russel Hirst. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010. 213-220.
  • Maylath, Bruce, Jeff Grabill, and Laura Gurak. "Intellectual Fit and Programmatic Power: Organizational Profiles of Four Professional/Technical/Scientific Communication Programs." Technical Communication Quarterly 19 (2010): 262-280.
  • Mousten, Birthe, Bruce Maylath, and John Humbley. "Pragmatic Features in the Language of Cross-Cultural Virtual Teams: A Roundtable Discussion of Student-to-Student Discourse in International Collaborative Project." Reconceptualizing LSP. Online proceedings of the XVII European Language for Specific Purposes Symposium 2009. Ed. Carmen Heine and Jan Engberg. Århus, Denmark: 2010. Web.
  • Maylath, Bruce, and Jeff Grabill. "The Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication at 35 Years: A Sequel and Perspective." Programmatic Perspectives 1 (2009). 
  • Maylath, Bruce, Sonia Vandepitte, and Birthe Mousten. "Growing Grassroots Partnerships: Trans-Atlantic Collaboration between American Instructors and Students of Technical Writing and European Instructors and Students of Translation," Ch. 4 in Designing Globally Networked Learning Environments: Visionary Partnerships, Policies, and Pedagogies. Eds. Doreen Stärke-Meyerring and Melanie Wilson. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2008. 52-66.
  • Mousten, Birthe, Sonia Vandepitte, and Bruce Maylath. "Intercultural Collaboration in the Trans-Atlantic Project: Pedagogical Theories and Practices in Teaching Procedural Instructions across Cultural Contexts," Ch. 9 in Designing Globally Networked Learning Environments: Visionary Partnerships, Policies, and Pedagogies. Eds. Doreen Stärke-Meyerring and Melanie Wilson. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2008. 129-144.
  • Gnecchi, Marusca, Bruce Maylath, Federica Scarpa, Birthe Mousten, and Sonia Vandepitte. "Professional Communication and Translation in Convergence." Proceedings of the IEEE International Professional Communication Conference, 13-16 July 2008, Concordia U, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Ed. Brian Still. New York: IEEE, 2008.
  • Maylath, Bruce. "A Response to Halloran's 2007 Plenary Sessions: Memories, Thought, and Language along the United States' Frontier West as a Shaper of U.S. Foreign Policy in the 21st Century." Proceedings of the Linguistic Circle of Manitoba and North Dakota, 26-27 Sept. 2008, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Ed. Chandice Johnson. Fargo, ND: LCMND, 2008.
  • Maylath, Bruce. "Translating Technical Documents." Podcast for the IEEE International Professional Communication Conference, 13-16 July 2008, Concordia U, Montréal, Québec, Canada. 
  • Maylath, Bruce. "Editing for Global Contexts." Technical Editing, 4th ed. Ed. Carolyn Rude. New York: Longman, 2008.

Dr. Kelly Sassi
Associate Professor & Director of the Red River Valley Writing Project

PhD Rhetoric and Composition (University of Michigan, 2008)

Office: Minard 318 E50
Phone: 701-231-7156
Kelly.Sassi@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: English Education, Composition, Writing Assessment, Young Adult Literature, Teacher Education, Social Justice

About Dr. Sassi

Kelly Sassi (PhD, University of Michigan, 2008) is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment—55% in the English department and 45% in the School of Education.  She serves as Director of the Red River Valley Writing Project and is on the national leadership team for the College, Career, and Community Writers Program. Sassi teaches courses in both English education and composition. Her research agenda focuses on social justice issues, including race in the classroom, fair practices in writing assessment, feminist research methodologies, pedagogical approaches to Native American literatures, multicultural field experiences, and the high school to college transition in writing.

Sassi’s most recent publication is a chapter titled, “Bending the Arc of Writing Assessment Toward Social Justice: Enacting Culturally Responsive Professional Development at Standing Rock” in the book Writing Assessment, Social Justice, and Advancement of Opportunity (2018) edited by Mya Poe, Asao Inoue, and Norbert Elliott. Sassi has co-authored three books, Writing on Demand for the Common Core State Standards Assessments (2014) Writing on Demand: Best Practice and Strategies for Success (2005) and A Student Guide to Writing on Demand (2006), with Anne Gere and Leila Christenbury. She has also published on anti-racist teaching practices (2008) and issues of plagiarism (2011) in English Journal, mentorship as methodology in Qualitative Inquiry, “warm demander” pedagogy in Urban Education, and immersive field experience in Multicultural Education.

A former high school English teacher, Sassi is passionate about rigorous and innovative preparation for future teachers, especially in terms of multicultural field experiences, often off campus, such as at Circle of Nations School or at historical sites like Fort Totten, where students have had opportunities to learn from Dakota and Ojibwe elders, as well as national scholars and local experts on North Dakota history. Sassi has had 30 successful grant proposals, many of which have funded new teaching and learning activities for North Dakota students, teachers, and community members. She won the Peltier Award for Innovative Teaching in 2018.

Sassi has served as faculty adviser for the Bison Men’s and Women’s Nordic Ski Clubs since 2009 and has been the Sigma Tau Delta adviser since 2017. She enjoys cross-country skiing, bicycling, and travel with her partner, Enrico Sassi, who directs NDSU’s Center for Writers. They have two college-aged sons. 

Please click here for access to Kelly's research.

Kelly Sassi CV

Recent Publications

Books

Articles

Book Chapters

  • "Bending the Arc of Writing Assessment Toward Social Justice: Enacting Culturally Responsive Professional Development at Standing Rock." In Writing Assessment, Social Justice, and Advancement of Opportunity. Eds. Mya Poe, Asao Inoue, and Norbert Elliott. Forthcoming 2018.
  • "Dismantling the Sound-Proof Walls That Are Barriers to a Just Future in Writing Assessment." In Writing Assessment, Social Justice, and Advancement of Opportunity. Eds. Mya Poe, Asao Inoue, and Norbert Elliott. Forthcoming 2017.
  • "Feminist-Indigenous Rhetorics of Survivance and Discursive Spaces in S. Alice Callahan's Wynema: A Child of the Forest." Book chapter in Feminist Challenges, Feminist Rhetorics: Locations, Scholarship, and Discourse. Cambridge University Press. March 2014. http://preview.tinyurl.com/cc8yae6
  • "Life on the Limen: Writing Teachers Negotiate Personal Identities and Professional Development." with Katie Gunter, Rebecca Mellem, and Craig Rood. Metamorphosis: The Effects of Professional Development on Graduate Students. Andrea Davis and Sue Webb, Eds. Southlake, Texas: Fountainhead Press, 2017. http://preview.tinyurl.com/blgcb3l

Conference Proceedings

  • "A Review of the Literature on Pedagogical Approaches to Native American/American Indian Literatures." Applied Social Sciences: Education Sciences. Georgeta Raţă, Patricia-Luciana Runcan and Hasan Arslan, Eds. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, January 2013. http://preview.tinyurl.com/d5huozk

Curricula

Dr. Verena Theile
Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies

PhD English Literature (Washington State University, 2006)

Office: Minard 318 E40
Phone: 701-231-7152
verena.theile@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Shakespeare, Early Modern Literature, Renaissance Drama, Witchcraft Studies, European Literature, Literary Theory

About Dr. Theile

Dr. Verena Theile joined the NDSU English department as an Assistant Professor in the Fall of 2008. She completed her PhD in English at Washington State University in 2006 with a focus on 16th- and 17th-century British literature and culture, especially drama and pamphlet literature, and a dissertation on representations of the supernatural on the early modern stage. Her MA is from Minnesota State University, Mankato (2001), where her thesis work focused on 17th-century poetry and Hermetic philosophy. Prior to her appointment at NDSU, Theile held a doctoral fellowship at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, Germany (2005), and served first as the Charles Blackburn post-doctoral fellow at Washington State University (2006) and then as a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Gonzaga University in Spokane (2007).

Research: Dr. Verena Theile is co-editor of Reclaiming Home, Remembering Motherhood, Redefining History: African American and Afro-Caribbean Women’s Literature in the Twentieth-Century (CSP, 2009), Staging the Superstitions of Early Modern Europe (Ashgate, forthcoming Feb. 2013), and New Formalisms and Literary Theory (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming Sept. 2014) and co-translator of early modern German quack texts in M. A. Katritzky’s Performance and Medicine in the Writings of Three Early Modern Physicians: The Brothers Felix and Thomas Platter and Hippolytus Guarinonius (Ashgate, 2012).

Her current book project, Performing Witchcraft in Early Modern England: Greene, Marlowe, Shakespeare, examines how superstitions were perceived and discussed in early modern pamphlet literature and then translated for the stage by early modern playwrights such as Robert Greene, Christopher Marlowe, and William Shakespeare. Highlighting their passage from the pamphlet to the play, she argues that, through their fictional representations on the early modern stage, superstitions reflect but also reshape beliefs.

Teaching: Most regularly, Dr. Theile teaches courses in Shakespeare, literary theory, and early modern literature for the English department. She additionally offers graduate seminars in literature pedagogy, scholarly publishing, and adaptation studies. Her critical focus lies with New Historicism, historiography, and the New Formalism.

Dr. Theile is the faculty leader for the Department's UK Study Abroad Program: 
2018: Literature & Pop Culture in Dublin, London, and Edinburgh
2016: England and Scotland: Literature and Popular Culture
2014: Shakespeare & Popular Culture in England 

Courses taught:
240 World Masterpieces
271 Literary Analysis
315 British Literature I
333 Fantasy and Science Fiction
380 Shakespeare
4/682 Renaissance Literature (Topics: Early Modern Superstitions, Faith in Conflict)
4/683 Topics in British Literature (Topics: Shakespearean Adaptations, Shakespeare & Theory)
758 Topics in Rhetoric and Writing (Topics: Editing and Publishing)
760 Graduate Scholarship
766 Teaching Literature

Web Portfolio: vtheile.wordpress.com

Verena Theile (cv)

Recent Publications

Books

  • Verena Theile. Performing Witchcraft on the Early Modern Stage: Marlowe, Greene, and Shakespeare. New York: Routledge. (ca. 125,000 words); revise/resubmit from external review; no due date.
  • Verena Theile. Shakespeare on the Prairie, 1916-2016. Fargo: NDSU Press. no due date.
  • Verena Theile, Linda Tredennick, eds. New Formalisms and Literary Theory (with a Foreword by Heather Dubrow). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, Apr. 2013. (ca. 120,000 words)
  • Verena Theile, Andrew McCarthy, eds. Staging the Superstitions of Early Modern Europe (with a Foreword by Darren Oldridge). Burlington, US: Ashgate Publishing, Feb. 2013. (ca. 125,000 words)
  • Verena Theile, Marie Drews, eds. Reclaiming Home, Remembering Motherhood, Rewriting History: African American and Afro-Caribbean Women’s Literature in the Twentieth Century. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Jun. 2009. (ca. 122,000 words)

Introductions

  • Verena Theile. “New Formalism(s): A Prologue.” In New Formalisms and Literary Theory. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, May 2013. pp. 3-28. (ca. 10,000 words)
  • Verena Theile, Andrew McCarthy “Superstitions, History, Literature, and the Creative Imagination.” In Staging the Superstitions of Early Modern Europe. Burlington, US: Ashgate Publishing, Feb. 2013. pp. 1-20. (ca. 7,600 words)
  • Verena Theile, Marie Drews. “Being Human in the World.” In Reclaiming Home, Remembering Motherhood, Rewriting History. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. pp. vii-xxi. (ca. 5,600 words)

Book Chapters

  • Verena Theile. “Early Modern Engagements with Fear, Witchcraft, the Devil, and that Damned Dr. Faustus.” In Staging the Superstitions of Early Modern Europe (Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama). Eds. Verena Theile and Andrew McCarthy. Burlington, US: Ashgate Publishing, Feb. 2013. pp. 59-84. (ca. 10,000 words)
  • Verena Theile. “Demonising Macbeth.” In Magical Transformations on the Early Modern English Stage (Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama). Eds. Lisa Hopkins and Helen Ostovich. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2014. pp. 75-89.(ca. 7,500 words)
  • Verena Theile. "Shakespeare on the Prairie: ShakespeareFest 2016." In Commemorating Shakespeare. Ed. Monika Smialkowska and Edmund King. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2018. (ca. 7,000 words)
  • Verena Theile. “Demons in the Theater.” In The Brill Companion to the Devil and Demons. Ed. Kathryn Edwards. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill NV, forthcoming 2020. (8-9,000 words); contract in hand.

Refereed Translations

  • MA Katritzky, Verena Theile, trans. “Felix Platter: the 1598 Wedding of Johann Georg,
Count of Hohenzollern, and Franziska, Countess of Salm.” In MA Katritzky’s Healing and Performance in the Writings of three Early Modern Physicians: The Brothers Felix and Thomas Platter and Hippolytus Guarinonius. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2012. 283-302. (ca. 7,600 words)
  • MA Katritzky, Verena Theile, trans. “Thomas Platter in Avignon: Jewish Life and
a Performing Quack Troupe in 1598.” In MA Katritzky’s Healing and Performance. 303-316. (ca. 5,200 words)
  • MA Katritzky, Verena Theile, trans. “Hippolytus Guarinonius’s Grewel:
35 Commedia dell’Arte Lazzi.” In MA Katritzky’s Healing and Performance. 317-338. (ca. 8,400 words)

Teaching Resource

  • Verena Theile. “Course Guide for English 467: Shakespeare.” Distance Degree Programs. Moscow, ID: Independent Study in Idaho, 2008. 118pp. (ca. 47,370 words)

Encyclopedia 

  • Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. The Literary Encyclopedia: http://litencyc.com/ (forthcoming in 2018)

Dr. Emily Wicktor
Assistant Professor of English

PhD English Literature (University of Kansas, 2010)

Office:
 Minard 318 E38
Phone: 701-231-8784
Emily.Wicktor@ndsu.edu

Research/Teaching: Victorian Literature, Victorian Sexuality, Rhetoric/Composition/Pedagogy, Modern American and British Drama, Literary Theory

About Dr. Wicktor

A native Minnesotan, Emily D. Wicktor earned her PhD in English from the University of Kansas in December 2010.  After teaching as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Tulane University, she joined the NDSU English department faculty in the fall of 2012.  Her academic interests include Victorian sexuality, Rhetoric/Composition/Pedagogy, Modern American and British drama, and literary theory. She is currently working on her manuscript, "Imbued with the Science of Venus": Female Fallenness, Sexual Pedagogy, and Victorian Pornography.

Recent Publications

Manuscript in preparation

  • "Imbued with the Science of Venus": Female Fallenness, Sexual Pedagogy, and Victorian Pornography.

Refereed Journal Articles in preparation

  • "Through a microscope, darling!": The Sexual and Scientific Pedagogy of Victorian Pornography. Victorians Institute Journal.
  • "Love and Safety : Learning, Teaching, and Ecstasy." Victorian Review.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • "Mississippi: Chinese Jump Rope Revisited." Organization & Environment 13.3 (2000): 333-37.

Book Chapters

  • "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein : Cultural Consciousness and Literary Critique." Patterns in Western Civilization. 3rd ed. Ed. Sarah Trulove and James Woelfel. Boston: Pearson, 2003. 106-20.

Emeritus Faculty

Bonfield, June P., Emerita Professor of English, Ph.D., 1969, University of Texas
Bovard, Richard W., Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1973, University of Denver
Brown, Muriel J., Emerita Professor of English, Ph.D., 1971, University of Nebraska
Cater, A. Catherine, Emerita Professor of English, Ph.D., 1945, University of Michigan
Cosgrove, William E., Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1972, University of Iowa
Helstern, Linda, Emerita Professor of English, Ph.D., 2001, Southern Illinois University
Krishnan, Ramakrishnan S., Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1981, University of Nebraska
Matchie, Thomas F., Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1974, University of Wisconsin
O'Connor, Robert, Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1979, Bowling Green State University
Peet, Howard D., Emeritus Professor of English, M.S., 1965, Moorhead State University
Richard Shaw, Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D. Ball State University, 1985
Strandness, Jean, Emerita Professor of English, Ph.D., 1974, Michigan State University
Sullivan, Dale L., Emeritus Professor of English, Ph.D., 1988, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Ward, Steve A., Emeritus Professor of English, M.A., 1964, North Dakota State University

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here to learn about NDSU English's History.


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