NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY - FARGO, N D


LANDSAT IMAGE OF THE
NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, &
MINNESOTA BORDER REGION



Click on the photo for an enlarged image. (69K)

The southernmost 20% of the previous image overlaps into the top portion of this image. "North" is indicated by a black arrow in the extreme upper-right corner.

Unlike the previous image, taken in spring, this image is taken at the end of summer. Reflectance induced by the presence of crops and/or stubble in fields results in a greater dominance by reds.

The arcuate feature in the top, left-center portion of the image represents a sediment fan deposited into Glacial Lake Agassiz by the Sheyenne River (see also previous image). The river ("River Warren") channel that formed the southern outlet of this enormous lake is in part reflected by the presence of the two elongate lakes in the right-central portion of the image: Lake Traverse (northernmost) and Big Stone Lake (southernmost). The north-south continental divide extends across Lake Traverse: its northern (controlled) outlet directs waters northward into the Red River-Nelson River drainage; its southern outlet directs waters into the Minnesota-Mississippi drainage.

The prominent, northward-pointing, triangular feature in the southern half of the image is the Prairie Coteau (Coteau des Prairies). Its tip just cuts across the North Dakota / South Dakota border. This feature is largely supported by glacial sediments, which in places may approach 250 m in thickness. During the last (late Wisconsinan) glaciation, the Prairie Coteau played a prominent role in splitting glacier ice into two lobes: the James Lobe, which advanced southward along the west flank of the feature, and the Des Moines Lobe, which advanced southward along the east flank.

The Prairie Coteau and the landscape/soil impact of the Des Moines Lobe advance are both nicely reflected in the next image.

(Image #1060-16485, USGS EROS Data Center, 21 September 1972).



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