Content | Navigation |

NDSU Human Development and Education Faculty Publish, Present

Fargo, N.D. – Sharon Query, assistant professor of human development and family science and 4-H youth specialist at NDSU, received a $16,065 grant from the North Dakota Governor’s Prevention Advisory Council on Drugs and Alcohol to provide travel stipends and printed material to participants in the April “Power of Parents” training in Bismarck.

Carol Buchholz Holland, assistant professor of counseling; James Korcuska, associate professor of counseling; and Robert C. Nielsen, professor of counseling, presented numerous professional programs at the North Dakota Counseling Association Midwinter Conference in Bismarck. Holland presented “Applications of Solution-Focused Approach in Schools” and “ACE 101: Helpful Tips on How to Apply for the Award of Counseling Excellence.” Korcuska presented “Motivational Interviewing; Preparing Clients for Change,” and Nielsen presented “Stress and the Helping Profession” and “Jeopardy: Round Two Cognitive Theories.” The three jointly presented “NDSU Counselor Education Program Update.”

At the North Dakota Counseling Association Conference in February, Buchholz Holland was selected as president-elect of the North Dakota School Counselor Association and Korcuska was selected as president-elect of the North Dakota Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

The NDSU Couple and Family Therapy program has been nominated for the 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Training Award. The award honors programs for significant contributions to the advancement of the field of marriage and family therapy by encouraging and training for the next generation of marriage and family therapy researchers and practitioners. The nomination was made by Douglas Sprenkle, director of the doctoral program in couple and family therapy at Purdue University. In his nomination, Sprenkle said, "The Couple and Family Therapy program at NDSU has played a leading role in developing training models and practices that are specifically designed to enhance therapists' abilities to provide competent and affirming therapy to culturally diverse and traditionally underserved clients." Ten letters of support were included in the nomination from national leaders in the field.

Brandy Randall, associate professor of human development and family science, and Molly Secor-Turner, assistant professor of nursing at NDSU, have been awarded $7,000 by the Innovative Small Grants program of the Society for Research on Adolescents. The grant will allow them to travel to Kenya to collect data for their research, which focuses on culturally specific risk and protective factors that influence rural adolescent behaviors and outcomes in the developed and developing world. 

Bryan Christensen, associate professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, was recertified as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

The NDSU physical education and health education programs recently sent 18 undergraduate students to the Central District American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Convention in Colorado Springs, Colo. Students attended a variety of sessions pertaining to curriculum content, career advancement and interview strategies. Jenny Eskew, assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences, accompanied students.

Christi McGeorge and Tom Carlson, associate professors of human development and family science, and their colleague, Russell Toomey from Arizona State University, had the article, “Establishing the validity of the feminist couple therapy scale: Measuring therapists’ use of feminist practices with heterosexual couples,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy.

Beth Blodgett Salafia, assistant professor of human development and family science, had an article appear in the February issue of the Journal of Child and Family Studies. The article, “Associations between multiple types of stress and disordered eating among girls and boys in middle school,” was co-written by Jessica Lemer, who earned a master’s degree in human development and family science in 2010.

Blodgett Salafia attended the Society for Research on Adolescence conference in early March where she presented research on three different studies. The first presentation is titled “Fathers’ direct and indirect effects on adolescent girls’ and boys’ disordered eating” and is co-written by Amanda Bulat, who earned a master’s degree in human development and family science in 2011. The second presentation is titled “A qualitative analysis of the perceptions of the causes of eating disorders according to individuals with eating disorders” and is co-written by Mallary Schaefer, a 2011 human development and family science master’s degree graduate. The third presentation is titled “Longitudinal connections among parenting, adolescent self-disclosure, maternal knowledge and adolescent depressive symptoms,” and is a collaborative effort with colleagues from the University of Notre Dame.

NDSU is a top-ranked research institution that combines teaching and research in a rich learning environment.


Student Focused. Land Grant. Research University.

Follow NDSU
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • RSS
  • Google Maps

RCA
Phone: 701.231.8045
Physical/delivery address:  1735 NDSU Research Park Drive/Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address:  P.O. Box 6050—Dept. 4000/Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Page manager: RCA