Summer Session 2021 Highlights

For a full listing of courses and details for registering, view the online schedule.

 Courses marked with a star fulfill a general education requirement at NDSU.


ACCT 102. Fundamentals of Accounting. 3 Credits.

Introduces financial statements and other accounting information to make personal and business decisions. Not available to majors and accounting minors in the College of Business Administration. Student may not have previously passed or be concurrently enrolled in ACCT 201.


*   ADHM 411. Food and World Cultures. 3 Credits.

An integrated approach to the study of foods and cultures. Food influences on demography, habitat, social traditions and settings, social status, religious beliefs, gender, and environmental considerations. History, concepts, and principles of cultures and cuisines.  F, S. Gen Ed: Humanities and Fine Arts | Cultural Diversity.


  ANTH 111. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Credits.

Introductory overview to anthropology, the holistic study of humans and the diversity of the human experience over space and time. Covers the major fields of anthropology: cultural and biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, applied anthropology. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


* ART 110. Intro to the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

Study and analysis of artistic methods and meaning in the visual arts; designed for non-majors.  Gen Ed: Humanities & Fine Arts.


BIOC 260. Elements of Biochemistry. 4 Credits.

Protein structure, function conformation, and dynamics; enzymes, DNA-RNA: structure and flow of genetic information; biological membranes; metabolism. 4 lectures. Prereq: CHEM 117 or CHEM 122CHEM 140 or CHEM 240.


  BIOL 100L. Non-Majors Biology Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experience to introduce the application of the scientific method across a wide scale of biological topics, including molecular biology, the organism, evolution, and ecology. Science and Technology (Natural Science).


  BIOL 111. Concepts of Biology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to a wide range of biological topics, from the organism, ecology, and evolution to the cell, molecular biology, and genetics. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Natural Science).


  BIOL 124. Environmental Science. 3 Credits.

Ecological principles related to human cultures, resource use, and environmental alterations. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Natural Science) | Global Perspectives.


  BIOL 126. Human Biology. 3 Credits.

Consideration of selected problems in human biology. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Natural Science).


BIOL 150. General Biology I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to cellular and molecular biology, genetics, and evolution.


BIOL 151. General Biology II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the biology of living organisms and their interactions with each other and their environments. Examples primarily involve plants and animals, but include other groups of organisms as well. Prereq: BIOL 150.


  BIOL 220. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 3 Credits.

An in-depth introduction to structure and function of human organ systems' cells, tissues, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, joints, muscle and muscular system, nervous tissue and nervous system, and the special senses. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Natural Science).


BIOL 460/660. Animal Physiology. 3 Credits.

Can turtles really breathe through their butts?
Do some mammals really lay eggs?
Do some frogs really allow themselves to freeze solid in the winter?

If any of these interesting animal questions interests you, then a course in Animal Physiology may be of interest to you. BIOL 460/660 (Animal Physiology) presents a broad overview of animal physiology and the fascinating ways in which animals have adapted to live across the globe. Animal physiology covers many aspects of organisms, from their subcellular structure and function to the whole-animal performance and abilities. Physiology encompasses all of the systems and functions that make life possible, from the day an animal is born until the day it dies. This course will deal with the physiological functions and structures of animals across all levels of organization (cells, tissues, organs, systems, organisms). We will especially highlight the uniqueness of animal physiology and some adaptations that have allowed animals to thrive in all sorts of environments. All content is delivered in an online, self-paced format to accommodate busy summer schedules.


BIOL 475/675. Conservation Biology. 3 Credits.

Are you interested in preserving biological diversity?
Are you planning on a career focused on wildlife, fisheries, or plants?
Are you interested in learning more about endangered or threatened species, climate change, human-wildlife interactions, or the current human-caused extinction crisis?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then a course in Conservation Biology will be of interest to you.

This course presents an integrative approach to the study and conservation of biodiversity. Application of principles from various sub-disciplines of the biological and social sciences to current conservation problems. We will discuss the roots of conservation biology, identify the major threats to biodiversity, and provide you with multiple opportunities to gain experience working with conservation biology data/examples.

You will get practice developing population models, using genetic data to make population inferences, and test competing conservation strategies for effectiveness. This course will use historic examples of conservation efforts to work through modern-day conservation issues and strategies. All in an online, self-paced format to accommodate busy summer schedules.


*  CFS 210. Introduction to Food Science and Technology. 3 Credits.

Overview of food components, food quality, nutrition, processing, packaging, safety, sanitation laws, sensory evaluation, distribution, and utilization. Gen Ed: Science & Technology (Natural Science).


  CHEM 117 - Chemical Concepts and Applications. 3 Credits.

Introduction to general and organic chemistry, with applications drawn from the health, environmental, and materials sciences. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 103, MATH 104 or MATH 107 or Math placement. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


  CHEM 121. General Chemistry I. 3 Credits.

Matter, measurement, atoms, ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometry, periodicity, and gases. Prereq or Co-req: MATH 103 or MATH 107 or Math placement. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


  CHEM 121L. General Chemistry I Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Matter, measurement, atoms, ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometry, periodicity, and gases. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 103 or MATH 107 or Math placement. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


  CHEM 122. General Chemistry II. 3 Credits.

Intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, solution chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Prereq: CHEM 121. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


  CHEM 122L. General Chemistry II Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, solution chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Prereq: CHEM 121L. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


CJ 325. Applied Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the scientific model, the philosophy and goals of science, and a detailed study of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Lecture. Co-req or Prereq: STAT 330. Cross-listed with POLS 325.


CJ 407/607. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the precursors, the processes, and the consequences of deviance in Western society. Prereq: SOC 110 or PSYC 111. Cross-listed with SOC 407.  {Also offered for graduate credit - see CJ 607.}


  COMM 110 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on content, organization, language, delivery, and critical evaluation of messages. Gen Ed: Communications.


  CSCI 114 - Microcomputer Packages. 3 Credits.

General introduction to computer concepts, operating systems, the internet, word processing, spreadsheets, database management and presentation software. Credit awarded only for CSCI 114 or CSCI 116, not both. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Technology).


*  CSCI 122. Visual BASIC. 3 Credits.
Introduction to programming in the BASIC/Visual BASIC language.  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning.


  ECON 105 - Elements of Economics. 3 Credits.

Study of demand and supply, competitive and noncompetitive markets, concepts of national income, unemployment, inflation, money, and fiscal and monetary policies. This course cannot be substituted for ECON 201 and ECON 202. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences | Global Perspectives.


  ECON 201. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Credits.

Nature, method, and scope of economic analysis; economic scarcity, resources, specialization of labor; supply-demand analysis; production and cost analysis; product and resource market structures; distribution of income; international trade. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences | Global Perspectives.


  ECON 202. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Credits.

Join us! Introductory macroeconomics will provide you an understanding of everyday topics we see on the news. The class will provide a basic understanding of topics about which economists advise everyone from local, national and world leaders to businessmen making decisions in board rooms around the world. In practical terms, we will discuss monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, what drives inflation and unemployment, and the government’s role in regulating and supporting business. It will be great! Not as interesting but important is the description from the bulletin: Aggregate income and employment analysis; business cycles, unemployment, inflation and economic growth; fiscal policy; money and monetary policy; the U.S. economy and the world economy. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences | Global Perspectives.


EDUC 475/775. Reading in the Content Area. 2 Credits.

Introduction to the relevance and need for incorporating reading and developing reading skills in middle and high school classrooms.


*  EMGT 445. Understanding Vulnerable Populations in Disasters. 3 Credits.
Using the framework of vulnerability theory this course examines research related to groups that have been historically labeled "special populations" and how their functional needs might be addressed through emergency management. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the concept of vulnerable populations and its relationship to disasters, the ways members of various populations can be impacted disproportionately by these events and needs that arise as a result, and what can or should be doing to help prepare for and respond to these needs.  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning.


  ENGL 120. College Composition II. 3 Credits.

Advanced practice in reading and writing of various genres for different situations and audiences. Includes field research, collaboration, and visual communication. Prereq: ENGL 110 or placement. Gen Ed: Communications.


  ENGL 320. Business and Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Intensive practice employing the conventions of writing needed in professional genres and settings: writing for specific audiences and purposes. Inform, analyze, evaluate, and persuade. Prereq: ENGL 120, Junior standing. Gen Ed: Communications.


  ENGL 321. Writing in the Technical Professions. 3 Credits.

Intensive practice employing the conventions of professional genres to write about technology development and use for expert, business, and more general audiences. Prereq: ENGL 120, Junior standing. Gen Ed: Communications.


  ENGL 324. Writing in the Sciences. 3 Credits.

The study and practice in written conventions of the sciences for academic, scientific, and public audiences. Prereq: ENGL 120. At least junior standing. Gen Ed: Communications.


  ENGL 325. Writing in the Health Professions. 3 Credits.

Study of and practice in language use and written conventions of the health professions for academic, scientific, and public audiences. Prereq: ENGL 120 and Junior standing. Gen Ed: Communications.


  ENGL 358. Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice for writing multiple genres in the humanities and social sciences. Prereq: ENGL 120, Junior standing. Gen Ed: Communications.


  GEOL 201. The Geology of Climate Change and Energy. 3 Credits.

Exploration and quantitative analysis of Earth system processes, geologic and instrumental records of global-scale climate change, and the interrelationship of climate change and energy consumption from fossil fuels. Gen Ed: Global Perspectives


  HDFS 230. Life Span Development. 3 Credits.

Study of human growth and development throughout the life span. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences


  HDFS 242. Couples, Marriages and Families. 3 Credits.

Study of the formation of relationships in varied contexts: examines the diversity of couples, marriages, and families that exists in our contemporary society. Emphasis will be on relationship health as well as barriers to relationship wellness. Gen Ed: Wellness.


*  HIST 101. Western Civilization I. 3 Credits.

Introductory survey of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1648, emphasizing major political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments. Gen Ed: Humanities & Fine Arts.


  HIST 102. Western Civilization II. 3 Credits.

Introductory survey of Western Civilization from 1648 to the present, emphasizing major political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments. Gen Ed: Humanities and Fine Arts.


  HNES 100 - Concepts of Fitness & Wellness. 2 Credits.
Facts about exercise and physical fitness. Gen Ed: Wellness.


  HNES 217. Personal and Community Health. 3 Credits.

Study of vital personal and community health issues. Particular attention to current health facts, habits, and attitudes as they relate to home, school, and community. Gen Ed: Wellness.


IME 440/640. Engineering Economy. 2-4 Credits.

Capital investment decision foundation within the rules of general and project accounting. Analysis of benefits and returns against cost for engineering installation, operation, life cycle, and buy-rent-lease decisions. Prereq: Junior standing or IME major.


IME 460/660. Evaluation of Engineering Data. 3 Credits.

Design of engineering experiments and evaluations, curve fitting, regression, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, Taguchi methods in engineering design. Coreq: MATH 166. F, S


MATH 103 - College Algebra. 3 Credits.

Relations and functions, equations and inequalities, complex numbers; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations, and matrices. Prereq: MATH 98 with a grade of C or higher or placement.


*  MATH 104. Finite Mathematics.  3 Credits.

Systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance, elementary probability and descriptive statistics. Prereq: MATH 98 with a grade of C or higher or placement. Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning.


MATH 105. Trigonometry. 3 Credits.

Angle measure, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, polar coordinates and applications. Prereq: MATH 103 or placement. Credit awarded only for MATH 105 or MATH 107, not both.


MATH 144. Mathematics for Business. 4 Credits.

Mathematics of finance, linear programming and its applications in business, limits, continuity, derivatives, implicit and logarithmic differentiation, higher order derivatives, optimization and extrema, partial differentiation, extreme values of functions of two variables. Prereq: MATH 103MATH 107 or placement exam. Credit awarded only for MATH 144 or MATH 146, not both.


MATH 165. Calculus I. 4 Credits.

Limits, continuity, differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, integration, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and applications. Prereq: MATH 105, MATH 107, or placement.  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning.


MATH 166. Calculus II. 4 Credits.

Applications and techniques of integration; polar equations; parametric equation; sequences and series, power series. Prereq: MATH 165.


MATH 259/265/494. Multivariate Calculus. 3 Credits.

Functions of several variables, vectors in two and three variables, partial derivatives, surfaces and gradients, tangent planes, differentials, chain rule, optimization, space curves, and multiple integrals. Prereq: MATH 166. Credit awarded only for MATH 259 or MATH 265, not both.


ME 221. Engineering Mechanics I. 3 Credits.

Scaler and vector approaches to trusses, frames and machines, internal forces, friction forces, center of gravity, centroid, and moment inertia. Prereq: MATH 165.


ME 222. Engineering Mechanics II. 3 Credits.

Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, work energy, impulse-momentum, principles of conservation of energy and momentum. Prereq: ME 221MATH 166.


ME 223. Mechanics of Materials. 3 Credits.

Introduction to stress, strain, and their relationships; torsion of circular shafts, bending stresses, deflection of beams, stress transformations. Prereq: ME 221.


MIS 116. Business Use of Computers. 3 Credits.

Exploration of how microcomputers are used in business with an emphasis in developing proficiency in Microsoft Excel and introduction to Microsoft Access. Credit will be awarded only for MIS 116, CSCI 114, or CSCI 116 but not more than one. Gen Ed: Science & Technology (Technology).


*  PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credits.
Basic problems, concepts, and methods of philosophy. Gen Ed: Humanities & Fine Arts.


*  PHIL 216. Business Ethics. 3 Credits.
Many of the central moral issues of business, such as consumer rights, advertising, employee rights, and business competition, are examined in light of the major ethical theories, such as Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and Relativism. Gen Ed: Humanities & Fine Arts.


  PHYS 211 - College Physics I. 3 Credits.

Beginning course for students without a calculus background. Includes basic principles of bodies at rest and in motion, fluids, vibrations, waves, sound and thermodynamics. Prereq: MATH 105 or higher. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


  PHYS 211L. College Physics I Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Beginning course for students without a calculus background. Includes basic principles of bodies at rest and in motion, fluids, vibrations, waves, sound and thermodynamics. Prereq: MATH 105. Co-req: PHYS 211. Gen Ed: Science and Technology (Physical Science).


PHYS 252. University Physics II. 4 Credits.

Electric charge, field, potential, and current; magnetic field; capacitance; resistance; inductance; RC, RL, LC and RLC circuits; waves; optics. Prereq: PHYS 251 or ME 222. Coreq: MATH 166.


PHYS 252L. University Physics II Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Electric charge, field, potential, and current; magnetic field; capacitance; resistance; inductance; RC, RL, LC and RLC circuits; waves; optics. Coreq: PHYS 252.


  POLS 220. International Politics. 3 Credits.

Concepts, theories, and issues in international relations. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences | Global Perspectives.


*  PSYC 111.  Intro to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


  PSYC 210. Human Sexuality. 3 Credits.

Survey of biological, developmental, and psychological aspects of human sexuality. Prereq: PSYC 111. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


  PSYC 212. Psychological Aspects of Drug Use and Abuse. 3 Credits.

Examination of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. Emphasis on psychological, physiological, and behavioral effects of these drugs and problems of drug abuse. Prereq: PSYC 111. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


*  SOC 110. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

Introductory analysis of the nature of society, the interrelationship of its component groups, and the process whereby society persists and changes. Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


*  STATS 330. Introductory Statistics. 3 Credits.

Frequency tables, histograms, probability, well-known probability distributions, one and two sample tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, and contingency tables. Prereq: MATH 103, MATH 104 or MATH 107 or Math placement into MATH 105, MATH 146 or MATH 165. Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning.


*   WGS 110. Women and Gender Studies. 3 Credits.

Exploration of a range of social/domestic and global issues related to women; development of a feminist framework for thinking and writing about woman and gender. Gen Ed: Humanities & Fine Arts | Cultural Diversity.


 

Next Steps

Now that you have looked at some of the options, you are ready to get started. If you are not yet enrolled at NDSU, simply fill out the (easy and free!) application to start the process. An admissions representative will contact you, and your journey begins.

Top of page