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Academic Majors

 


Landscape Architecture

Landscape architects provide a wide variety of professional services to individuals, organizations, corporations and government agencies. Landscape architects are involved in all phases of the development of a site, from the initial discussion of ideas through the construction of the project. Their duties require a variety of skills-site planning and design, site engineering, management and supervision. They work with architects, planners and engineers involving all aspects of our environment.

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Career Opportunities

Landscape architects design and develop interpretive parks, arboretums, zoos, golf courses, playgrounds, recreation areas and farmsteads. They also design multifunctional areas for urban renewal projects, college campuses, industrial parks and new towns. Besides designing sites, landscape architects select building sites, prepare cost data, initiate long-range planning, select utility corridors and prepare environmental impact statements. When working on large projects or for large landscape architectural firms, landscape architects often specialize in one phase of the work, such as project design or administration contracts. This often requires working with engineers, planners and architects.

The Program

The Department of Architecture and Landscape Architecture offers an accredited five-year course of study leading to a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (B.L.A.). You may elect to receive a pre-professional Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in environmental design at the end of four years. This degree is useful for those who want to enter graduate programs at other universities. The program is one of approximately 60 professional programs in landscape architecture in the United States and Canada that are accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board.

The first year of study addresses the understanding of the environment and our impact on nature. This is accomplished through lectures, assigned readings and environment-related projects. At the sophomore level, students begin four years of study in landscape architectural design. The design courses involve individual and group projects. Other courses span the remaining four years and range from the History of Landscape Architecture to Contemporary Issues. It is in the design studios that these courses are applied. Projects in landscape architecture design are often assigned much like a practicing landscape architect would receive them from a client. In the fourth year, students become heavily involved with the use of computers in their studies, lectures and construction courses.

In design studios, function and aesthetics of a project are carefully studied, along with the social and environmental conditions that limit the design solution. Project sites are inventoried, analyzed and summarized to develop schematic layouts and preliminary sketches. Models, diagrams and perspectives are used to investigate aspects of the design and to test the integration of all systems that are part of it, such as movement of people, building access and service points, site lighting, and climatic impact. At the same time, and with equal emphasis, students study the economic, social and psychological impact of their design proposals.

Activities and Facilities

The landscape architecture program activities include:

  1. Student Chapters of the American Society of Landscape Architects and Sigma Lambda Alpha,
  2. Field trips to U. S. and Canadian cities,
  3. Visiting lecturers who speak on landscape architecture and related topics,
  4. Joint studio projects with architecture students and faculty,
  5. Summer study programs in Europe and North America,
  6. Summer intern opportunities, and
  7. Study abroad opportunities through International Student Exchange Program.

Our facilities include:

  1. An Architecture and Landscape Architecture Library of about 18,000 books, 70 magazine subscriptions and 36,000 slides;
  2. Personal computers and output devices available for student use, along with computer-aided design and geographic information systems software;
  3. Photographic and graphic reproduction equipment;
  4. Individual studio spaces in the second through fifth years;
  5. A well-equipped wood shop.

High School Preparation

The best courses to study in high school are those that would be recommended for any demanding college program-a positive mixture of courses in life sciences, chemistry, physics, art, geometry, humanities and social sciences. Our five-year curriculum has little flexibility in courses required. Courses in mechanical drawing and architectural drawing are not necessary and, in fact, may be less useful than general academic subjects and freehand drawing classes.

Transfer Students

Applying for admission early is necessary so all information is processed before the beginning of each academic year. Applications should include official transcripts from other institutions covering all course work completed prior to enrollment at North Dakota State University. Transfer applicants are required to enter the landscape architecture program at the first-year level or second-year level if freshman credits are completed.

Selective Admission

Approximately 16 landscape architecture majors are taken into the second year of the program. It is important to apply early, complete all freshman courses in the first year, and maintain a solid academic record. Each second year student must purchase a laptop computer before entering the fall semester. This computer will allow students to explore many areas of landscape architecture, computer graphics and technology.

Sample Curriculum

General Education Requirements

Credits

____________________________________________________

First Year Experience

  Univ. 189 - Skills for Academic Success

1

Communication

  Comm. 110 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking

3

  Engl. 110, 120 - College Composition I, II

3, 3

  Engl. 357 - Visual Culture and Language

3

Quantitative Reasoning

  Math. 104 - Finite Math or
   Math. 146 - Applied Calculus I


3 or 4

Science & Technology

  Biol. 124 - Environmental Biology

3

  Geol. 105 - Physical Geology or
   Geol. 106 - The Earth Through Time


3

Science & Technology Elective

3

Science Lab

1

Humanities & Fine Arts

  Arch. 321 - History of Arch I

3

  EnvD. 101 - Introduction to Environmental Design

3

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  Anth. 111 - Introduction to Anthropology

3

  Psyc. 111 - Introduction to Psychology or
   Soc. 110 - Introduction to Sociology


3

Wellness

2

Cultural Diversity

  Anth. 111 - Introduction to Anthropology

-

Global Perspective

  Arch. 321 - History of Architecture I

-

Total

40

Major Requirements

Credits

____________________________________________________

EnvD. 130 - Drawing for Environmental Designers

3

EnvD. 172 - Environmental Design Fundamentals

4

LA 231 - Landscape Architecture Graphics

3

LA 232 - Design Technology

3

LA 271 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture Studio

6

LA 272 - Parks & Open Spaces Studio

6

LA 322 - History of Landscape Architecture

4

LA 341, 342 - Site Development and Detailing I and II

4, 4

LA 371 - Site Planning and Design Studio

6

LA 372 - Community Planning & Design Studio

6

LA 441 - Site Development and Detailing III

4

LA 471 - Urban Design Studio

6

LA 472 - Remediation & Planting Design Studio

6

LA 552 - Advance Landscape Planning

2

PlSc. 355 - Woody Plants

3

Electives

20

Total

90

Additional Requirements (BLA Degree)

Credits

____________________________________________________

LA 563 - Programming and Thesis Preparation

3

LA 571 - Environmental Planning Studio

6

LA 572 - Design Thesis

8

LA 581 - Professional Practice

3

LA 590 - Seminar Spring Trip or

  Arch - 789 Professional Topics in Architecture

2 or 3

LA 590 - Seminar Fall Trip or

  Arch - 789 Professional Topics in Architecture

2 or 3

Electives

2-4

Total

30

Curriculum Total (B.S. Degree)

130

Curriculum Total (BLA Degree)

160

This sample curriculum is not intended to serve as a curriculum guide for current students, but rather an example of course offerings for prospective students. For the curriculum requirements in effect at the time of entrance into a program, consult with an academic adviser or with the Office of Registration and Records.

Klai Hall
Room 108

Klai Hall is located in downtown Fargo at 711 2nd Ave. N. (Campus Map)

NDSU Downtown
Art, Architecture & Landscape Architecture Administrative Office Room 105


NDSU Downtown is located in downtown Fargo at 650 NP Ave. (Campus Map)

Contact Information

Department of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
North Dakota State University
Klai 108
Dept. 2465, PO Box 6050
Fargo, ND 58108-6050

Tel: (701) 231-5788 / Fax: (701) 231-7342
Email:Donna.Theusch@ndsu.edu
Web: www.ndsu.edu/ala/

Office of Admission
North Dakota State University
Ceres 114
Dept 5230, PO Box 6050
Fargo, ND 58108-6050

Tel: (701) 231-8643 / Fax: (701) 231-8802
Email: NDSU.Admission@ndsu.edu
Web: www.ndsu.edu/admission/


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Office of Admission
North Dakota State University
Phone: +1 (701) 231-8643 / Fax: (701) 231-8802
Campus address: Ceres Hall 114
Physical/delivery address: 1301 Administration Ave., Fargo, ND 58102
Mailing address: NDSU Dept. 5230 / PO Box 6050 / Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Page manager: NDSU WebMaster

Last Updated: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 2:11:49 PM