Date Title Author
Jan. 10, 2022    
Jan. 17, 2022 <Holiday>Martin Luther King, Jr. Day  
Jan. 24, 2022 The James Webb Space Telescope: What’s the Big Deal? Alan Denton
Jan. 31, 2022 Physics of Soft Colloids: From Shape-Shifting Polymers to Magical Swelling Microgels Alan Denton
Feb. 7, 2022 Applications of time-dependent excited-state molecular dynamics Dmitri Kilin
Feb. 14, 2022    
Feb. 21, 2022 <Holiday> Presidents' Day  
Feb. 28, 2022    
Mar. 7, 2022    
Mar. 14, 2022 <Holiday> Spring Break  
Mar. 21, 2022 Monte-Carlo Lattice Gases: Increasing the Efficiency of Integer Lattice Gases via a Sampling Collision Operator Noah Seekins
Mar. 28, 2022 <Cancelled> Andrew B. Croll
Apr. 4, 2022 Lattices and models Ilya Karlin
Apr. 11, 2022 Rare-earth-doped semiconductors for optoelectronic and quantum information applications Khang Hoang
Apr. 18, 2022 <Holiday> Spring Recess  
Apr. 25, 2022 Recent Progress in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at the National Ignition Facility and the Role of First-Principles Simulations of Matter Under Extreme Conditions Deyan Mihaylov
May 2, 2022 <Dead Week> Nick Carroll
May 9, 2022 <Exam Week  

Recent Progress in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at the National Ignition Facility and the Role of First-Principles Simulations of Matter Under Extreme Conditions
Dr. Deyan Mihaylov

Laboratory for Laser Energetics,
University of Rochester
 

Monday, April 25, 3:00-4:00pm, 221 South Engineering and on Zoom (Contact Alexander Wagner for link).

Refreshments at 2:30

Nuclear fusion, where deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuse to make alpha particles (helium ions), neutrons and a great amount of excess energy is the physical process which powers the sun and if harnessed in the lab, has the potential to provide a clean and abundant worldwide energy resource. One way to achieve this is by using lasers to rapidly compress and heat a DT target to the conditions necessary for fusion - a process referred to as inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Significant efforts towards making ICF a viable energy resource began in the late 1970s, but it wasn't until 2021 when a burning plasma (a state in which most of the heating of the target comes from fusion reactions within the target) was achieved in an experiment at the National Ignition Facility. This experiment set a new record for the energy produced by an ICF implosion - 1.3 MJ, which is 70% of the energy delivered by the laser and 25 times the previous record set in 2018. In this talk I will discuss some of the physics behind these recent exciting results and in particular, the important role of first-principles simulation of matter at extremely high temperatures and densities where currently the most successful tool is molecular dynamics driven by density functional theory.

Rare-earth doped semiconductorsfor optoelectronics and quantum application
Dr. Khang Hoang

Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology & Department of Physics,
North Dakota State University
 

Monday, April 11, 3:00-4:00pm, This will be a  hybrid seminar in room 208 in South Engineering and on zoom (contact Alexander Wagner for link)

Rare-earth (RE) doped semiconductors have long been of interest for optoelectronics and spintronics. More recently, they have also been considered for quantum applications (e.g., quantum computing, quantum memories, and quantum communication). Whether a RE dopant is being harnessed for traditional optical applications or novel quantum technologies, having a fundamental understanding of the interaction between the dopant and the semiconductor host is key to realizing its potential. In this talk, I present recent studies of the interaction between gallium nitride (GaN) and lanthanide dopants using state-of-the-art first-principles defect calculations [1]. I will then discuss its implications on defect↔band and intra-f optical transitions and prospects of RE-doped semiconductors for quantum applications.

 [1] Hoang, Phys. Rev. Mater. 5, 034601 (2021); Phys. Rev. Mater. (2022), in press, arXiv.2201.03651.

 

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