Date
Title
Author
August 26, 2019
September 2, 2019<Labor Day>
September 9, 2019
September 16, 2019The effect of domain size polydispersity on the structural and dynamical properties of lipid monolayers
Elena Rufeil Fiori
September 23, 2019
September 30, 2019
October 7, 2019
October 14, 2019HJ-Aggregate Theory Applied to Interacting SP3­­-hybridization
 Defects in Carbon Nanotubes
Braden Weight
October 21, 201950 Years After Becoming A Bison, I Work On Dragons
or
Quantum Dragon Nanodevices:
Zero Electrical Resistance in Disordered Systems

Mark Novotny
October 28, 2019

November 4, 2019

November 11, 2019<Veterans Day>
November 18, 2019
November 25, 2019

December 2, 2019

<TBA>Mohammed Alziyadi
December 9, 2019<Dead Week>Brianna Santangelo
December 16, 2019<Finals Week>

 

50 Years After Becoming A Bison, I Work On Dragons
or
Quantum Dragon Nanodevices:
Zero Electrical Resistance in Disordered Systems
Mark A. Novotny

Professor and Head
Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
William L. Giles Distinguished Professor
Mississippi State University

Monday, Oct 21, 3:00-4:00pm, 221 South Engineering

Refreshments at 2:30

I started as a Physics major at NDSU in the fall of 1969.  Fifty years later, I perform research on quantum computing and quantum dragon nanodevices.  Some ‘wisdom’ from my time at NDSU and after will pepper my ‘proper’ presentation on quantum dragons.

Quantum effects in nanodevices can lead to unexpected physical properties.  Quantum dragon nanodevices are introduced.  They can have very strange shapes, be very disordered, be very tatty, and still have complete electron transmission when attached appropriately to uniform leads.  Complete electron transmission induces zero electrical resistance in four probe measurements.  Furthermore, even though the quantum dragon devices have arbitrarily strong locally-correlated disorder, they exhibit ‘order amidst disorder’.  A number of quantum dragon devices will be described, as well as instances where small deviations cause nanodevices to be almost quantum dragons.

 

HJ-Aggregate Theory Applied to Interacting SP3­­-hybridization
 Defects in Carbon Nanotubes
Braden M. Weight

Graduate Student,
Department of Physics,
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,
North Dakota State University

Monday, Oct 7, 3:00-4:00pm, 221 South Engineering

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been recently studied in greater depth due to their promise of superior electronic properties for tunable emission in the infrared. Optical features of functionalized (via SP3-hybridization defects) CNTs have been narrowed to only a few main parameters: (I) chirality, (II) defect configuration, and (III) defect electronegativity. Previous theoretical studies have been directed at single-defect pairs attached to the CNT surface, and, until recently, no literature has discussed the effects of defect concentration on CNTs in any depth [1,2]. In this work, we aim to model the interactions between nearby defects using density functional theory (DFT) and, extending to excited states, with time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) in order to fit these interactions to a well-known descriptor of analogous systems known as HJ-aggregate theory.[1] Nat. Comm. 2019, 10, 1, 2041-1723[2] ACS Nano 2019, 13, 7, 8222-8228I

 

The effect of domain size polydispersity on the structural and dynamical properties of lipid monolayers
Elena Rufeil Fiori

Assistant Professor,
Facultad de Matmàtica, Astronomìa y Fìsica,
Ciudad Universitaria, Argentina

 

Monday, Sept 16, 3:00-4:00pm, 221 South Engineering

 

In lipid monolayers with phase coexistence, domains of the liquid-condensed phase always present size polydispersity. Because of the difference in surface densities, domains have excess dipolar density with respect to the surrounding liquid expanded phase, originating a dipolar inter-domain interaction. This interaction depends on the domain area, and hence the presence of a domain size distribution is associated with interaction polydispersity. By means of Brownian dynamics simulations, we study the radial distribution function (RDF) and the average time-dependent self-diffusion coefficient of lipid monolayers with normally distributed size domains. For this purpose, we vary the relevant system parameters, polydispersity and interaction strength, within a range of experimental interest. We also analyze the consequences of using a monodisperse model to determine the interaction strength from an experimental RDF.



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