Faculty Research Series on Engaged Citizenship and Inclusion

This series of talks showcases the scholarly research of NDSU faculty who have published on matters of social responsibility, equality, inclusion, and/or open-minded, ethical decision-making and action as related to topics including race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, ability, religion, or issues facing the LGBTQ+ community. Past talks have included “Historical Sex Work: New Contributions from History and Archaeology” (Drs. Angela J. Smith and Kristen R. Fellows), “Life and Politics on the U.S.-Mexico Border (Dr. Heath Wing), and Health Insurance in Rural American: A Partial Equilibrium Analysis” (Dr. William Nganje). For information on the research series and additional resources on the topic, please visit the resource page at the Libraries.

Dear NDSU Community,  

Please join us for our series of virtual research talks that will showcase the work of faculty who have published on matters of social responsibility, equality, inclusion, and/or open-minded, ethical decision-making and action as related to topics including race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, ability, religion, or issues facing the LGBTQ+ community.  

Our first featured speaker of the school year is Dr. Anne Blankenship, presenting on Varieties of Americanization in the Early 20th Century. 

Wednesday, October 20 at 3 p.m. central, via Zoom Webinar

Dr. Anne Blankenship, Associate Professor, Dept of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies

Inclusion or Exclusion? Varieties of Americanization in the Early 20th Century. 


Zoom link: 
https://ndsu.zoom.us/j/97557830505?pwd=T1lJSlB0bG1yK0pSdjNpREp0VDRadz09 

Anne Blankenship is Associate Professor of Religious Studies in NDSU's History, Philosophy, & Religious Studies Department. Her research investigates religious responses to injustice and relationships between national, racial, and religious identities. Blankenship’s current book project is titled Religion, Race, and Immigration: How Jews, Catholics, and Protestants Faced Mass Immigration, 1882-1924. The project has received support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Academy of Religion, and several other institutions. She received her doctoral degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Abstract: At the turn of the twentieth century, millions of southern Italians and Eastern Europeans entered the United States. Their presence alarmed most Americans, not least of all their Catholic and Jewish co-religionists. By the late 1800s, Irish Catholics and German Jews had gained tentative acceptance within American society, and many felt that these new immigrants with their Old World dress, language, religious practices, and food threatened that status. Thus began concerted campaigns of Americanization, one white Protestants supported as well. This presentation explores how their differing definitions of Americanization coincided or clashed and the closely related role of religion. 

The NDSU Faculty Research Series (FRS) on Engaged Citizenship and Inclusion showcases the scholarly research of NDSU faculty who have published on matters of social responsibility, equality, inclusion, and/or open-minded, ethical decision-making and action as related to topics including race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, ability, religion, or issues facing the LGBTQ+ community.  

Propose a Research Talk 

FRS welcomes proposals from NDSU faculty about their published (or soon-to-be published) research. Ideas should be submitted via email to Jess Jung at jessica.jung@ndsu.edu

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